In recent years, China and India have become the most important economic partners of Africa and their footprints are growing by leaps and bounds, transforming Africa's international relations in a dramatic way. Although the overall impact of China and India's engagement in Africa has been positive in the short-term, partly as a result of higher returns from commodity exports fuelled by excessive demands from both countries, little research exists on the actual impact of China and India's growing involvement on Africa's economic transformation. This book examines in detail the opportunities and challenges posed by the increasing presence of China and India in Africa, and proposes critical interventions that African governments must undertake in order to negotiate with China and India from a stronger and more informed platform.
This book demonstrates how the growing economic power of China and India is already influencing the growth patterns of African countries, particularly oil- and commodities-exporting ones.
Explaining the determinants of China and India’s development cooperation in Africa cannot be achieved in simple terms. After collecting over 1000 development cooperation projects by China and India in Africa using AidData, this book applies the method of qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) to understand the motives behind their development cooperation. Mthembu posits that neither China nor India were solely motivated by one causal factor, whether strategic, economic or humanitarian interests or the size of their diaspora in Africa. China and India are driven by multiple and conjunctural factors in providing more development cooperation to some countries than others on the African continent. Only when some of these respective causal factors are combined is it evident that both countries disbursed high levels of development cooperation to some African countries.
China and India's spectacular economic rise over the last two decades has accelerated their trade and investment flows with the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), particularly with the oil-producing countries. And while these flows are still small, China and India's presence in the region is on the rise. This report focuses on the following questions: what have been evolution and the impact of MENA's trade and investment relations with China and India? what actions can be taken to maximize the benefits from these relations and to enhance MENA's international integration? The main findings indicate that the region as a whole has benefited from the rise of China and India in terms of better terms of trade, significant increases in oil and gas exports, and cheaper imports. However, producers of industrial goods have been negatively-and in a few cases severely-affected by competition with the two Asian countries in both third and domestic markets. While China and India are investing more in MENA, they are contributing very little to job creation or to the transfer and diffusion of technology. Faster growth in the two Asian countries-and the associated higher demand for energy-will increase revenues from oil and the difficult choices associated with their management. For the labor-abundant, non oil-producing countries, competition with China and India will increase. But the lack of competitive manufacturing industries and services, the insufficient attention given in the past to building technological capabilities and promoting openness and entrepreneurship are constraining their ability to respond to competition. They need to accelerate productivity to tackle unemployment, especially among youth. This may require the broader institutional changes seen in China and India-suggesting the importance of a pragmatic reform agenda that can accelerate productivity, trade, and investment in the region.
From multi-billion dollar investments in oil and minerals to the influx of thousands of merchants, labourers and cheap consumer goods, China's economic and political reach is redefining Africa's traditional ties with the international community. This text investigates the emerging relationship between China and Africa.
This collection juxtaposes a variety of approaches about China and Africa, and their interrelations seeking to go beyond early, simplistic formulations. Perspectives informed by Polanyi advance nuanced analysis of varieties of capitalisms and double-movements. It seeks to put contemporary China-Africa relations in critical, comparative context and in doing so, it will go beyond descriptions of inter-regional trade and investment, large- and small-scale sectors, to ask whether structural change is underway. Already it is apparent that the growing presence of China in Africa presents the latter with some novel options but whether these will generate a new embeddedness remains problematic. Highlighting the ‘varieties of capitalisms’ in the new century, given the undeniable difficulties of extreme neo-liberalism in the US and UK by contrast, to the apparent ebullience of the emerging economies in the global South, this book examines such implications for international relations, international political economy, development studies and policies.
Essay from the year 2018 in the subject Politics - International Politics - Topic: Development Politics, grade: A, The University of York, course: MA (Conflict, Development and Governance), language: English, abstract: Based on the Africanist theory of International Relations, the paper examines how the rise of the BRICS countries, particularly China, reshaped the economic and geopolitical realities in Africa for the past two decades. Across infrastructure financing, trade, investment and aid, there is no other traditional Western Power with such colossal engagement in Africa than China. The Chinese companies invest enormously in all across Africa by bringing new technologies, creating jobs, developing skills for the local Africans and immensely contributing to the Africa state’s public revenue. The recent Africa-China economic relationship has threatened the dominance of the traditional ‘Great Powers' in the fields of economics and geopolitics. However, the paper will shed light on the challenges of the Sino/Africa relations from the African perspectives particularly how the Chinese workers and the ‘cheap' and ‘substandard’ products overflowing African domestic markets. Considering both sides of the coin, China's involvement in Africa is perceived positively by Africans, as such China is a significant partner who has generated multiple prospects for African development despite Africa’s development move is relatively sluggish.
Through detailed country-level analysis, this study offers contributions to the understanding of the relationship between China, India, and SSA. The authors review and assess the economic impacts, and provide recommendations to assist policy-makers enhance the ability of SSA countries to take advantage of new opportunities.
The contributors explore the rapid growth of Indian multinationals and provide valuable insights into the patterns and trends of their outward investments and the factors that led to their emergence in the global FDI market. They also look at their continuously evolving strategies in theglobal economy.
Afrika ist ein armer Kontinent. Ein Kontinent voller Hunger, blutiger Konflikte, gescheiterter Staaten, voller Korruption und Elend. Um zu helfen, adoptieren Prominente afrikanische Halbwaisen und flanieren durch Flüchtlingslager, laden die Gutmenschen unter den Popstars zu Benefiz-Konzerten, und westliche Staaten haben in den letzten 50 Jahren eine Billion Dollar an afrikanische Regierungen gezahlt. Aber trotz Jahrzehnten von billigen Darlehen, nicht rückzahlbaren Krediten, Schuldenerlassen, bilateraler und multilateraler Hilfe steht Afrika schlimmer da als je zuvor. Mit Dead Aid hat Dambisa Moyo ein provokatives Plädoyer gegen Entwicklungshilfe und für Afrika geschrieben. Knapp, faktenreich und zwingend legt sie ihre Argumente dar. Entwicklungshilfe, im Sinne von Geld-Transfers zwischen Regierungen, macht abhängig. Sie zementiert die bestehenden Gegebenheiten, fördert Korruption und finanziert sogar Kriege. Sie zerstört jeden Anreiz, gut zu wirtschaften und die Volkswirtschaft anzukurbeln. Entwicklungshilfe zu beziehen ist einfacher, als ein Land zu sanieren. Im Gegensatz zu Bono und Bob Geldoff weiß Moyo, wovon sie spricht. Die in Sambia geborene und aufgewachsene Harvard-Ökonomin arbeitete jahrelang für die Weltbank. In Dead Aid erklärt sie nicht nur, was die negativen Folgen von Entwicklungshilfe sind und warum China für Afrika eine Lösung und nicht Teil des Problems ist; sie entwirft zudem einen Weg, wie sich Afrika aus eigener Kraft und selbstbestimmt entwickeln kann. In den USA und Großbritannien löste Dead Aid eine hitzige Debatte aus. Es stand mehrere Wochen auf der New York Times Bestsellerliste und wurde vom Sunday Herald zum Buch des Jahres gewählt. Das Time Magazine wählte Dambisa Moyo 2009 zu einer der 100 wichtigsten Persönlichkeiten der Welt.
In the past decade, the need for oil in Asia's new industrial powers, China and India, has grown dramatically. The New Kings of Crude takes the reader from the dusty streets of an African capital to Asia's glistening corporate towers to provide a first look at how the world's rising economies established new international oil empires in Sudan, amid one of Africa's longest-running and deadliest civil wars. For over a decade, Sudan fuelled the international rise of Chinese and Indian national oil companies. But the political turmoil surrounding the historic division of Africa's largest country, with the birth of South Sudan, challenged Asia's oil giants to chart a new course. Luke Patey weaves together the stories of hardened oilmen, powerful politicians, rebel fighters, and human rights activists to show how the lure of oil brought China and India into Sudan--only later to ensnare both in the messy politics of a divided country. His book also introduces the reader to the Chinese and Indian oilmen and politicians who were willing to become entangled in an African civil war in the pursuit of the world's most coveted resource. It offers a portrait of the challenges China and India are increasingly facing as emerging powers in the world.
There is growing consensus in the literature that trade and trade policy matter for a pro-poor growth and development strategy. Therefore, policies that are consistent with this strategy feature increasingly in many African countries where poverty is endemic and rapid and where sustainable economic growth is viewed as the major vehicle for poverty reduction. Key elements of these polices include measures that promote the expansion and diversification of production and trade in Africa. This book is aimed at articulating appropriate structural and policy measures for eliminating the constraints that African countries face and thus ensuring that they can derive maximum benefits from all available market access opportunities. There is evidence that most African countries face external market access barriers in their major export destinations which are generally less constraining than those confronting countries in other developing country regions. Yet, they have generally not been able to take full advantage of the special (preferential) market access opportunities available to them. This suggests that improved external market access, whether reciprocal or preferential, would not, by itself, be sufficient for strengthening African export performance. In this collection, export supply response capacity takes external (beyond-the-border) factors as given and concentrates primarily on the internal (behind-the-border) factors that influence production and distribution costs and, thus, competitiveness. The central working hypothesis of this book is that the inability of domestic producers and exporters in Africa to respond quickly, effectively and efficiently to external market access opportunities is caused by various limitations of their internal supply capacity and that this, in turn, is largely responsible for the lacklustre export performance of many African countries. This comprehensive study should be of interest to students and researchers of international trade and development economics as well as African studies.
Japan's Foreign Aid Policy in Africa seeks to evaluate TICAD's intellectual contribution to and its development practices regarding Africa over the past 20 years. A central conclusion is that, while TICAD bureaucrats lacked agency to support Japanese companies in Africa, the model of emerging powers partnerships has expanded in Africa.
This book examines key emergent trends related to aspects of power, sovereignty, conflict, peace, development, and changing social dynamics in the African context. It challenges conventional IR precepts of authority, politics and society, which have proven to be so inadequate in explaining African processes. Rather, this edited collection analyses the significance of many of the uncharted dimensions of Africa's international relations, such as the respatialisation of African societies through migration, and the impacts this process has had on state power; the various ways in which both formal and informal authority and economies are practised; and the dynamics and impacts of new transnational social movements on African politics. Finally, attention is paid to Africa's place in a shifting global order, and the implications for African international relations of the emergence of new world powers and/or alliances. This edition includes a new preface by the editors, which brings the findings of the book up-to-date, and analyses the changes that are likely to impact upon global governance and human development in policy and practice in Africa and the wider world post-2015.
Prof. Jagdish Sheth's book Chindia Rising as a brilliant analysis of not only how China and India will occupy the prime position as two great economies in the future, but how they are different from economies that became success stories. Indeed in the 19th and 20th Century, Europe and U.S. were the main players, and later Japan and Korea, each followed a model based on their culture, resources, and markets. Both India and China are operating in a new environment, where capital is not scarce, entrepreneurship is a winner, globalization and communications is a reality for future growth, and we have abundance of bright human resources and huge domestic markets. These observations, and particularly the analysis of the differences between Western economies and Chindia, with enumerable examples, reads like a well researched case study
Energy in Europe and Russia is in flux. This book presents a rich set of case studies for analyzing the complex and intertwined regional dynamics of multiple actors, levels, and policy fields in energy throughout Europe and Russia, with the aim of offering an alternative view to the prevalent geopolitical or neoliberal approaches.
Ausgezeichnet mit dem NDR Kultur Sachbuchpreis 2018 als bestes Sachbuch des Jahres Demokratien sterben mit einem Knall oder mit einem Wimmern. Der Knall, also das oft gewaltsame Ende einer Demokratie durch einen Putsch, einen Krieg oder eine Revolution, ist spektakulärer. Doch das Dahinsiechen einer Demokratie, das Sterben mit einem Wimmern, ist alltäglicher – und gefährlicher, weil die Bürger meist erst aufwachen, wenn es zu spät ist. Mit Blick auf die USA, Lateinamerika und Europa zeigen die beiden Politologen Steven Levitsky und Daniel Ziblatt, woran wir erkennen, dass demokratische Institutionen und Prozesse ausgehöhlt werden. Und sie sagen, an welchen Punkten wir eingreifen können, um diese Entwicklung zu stoppen. Denn mit gezielter Gegenwehr lässt sich die Demokratie retten – auch vom Sterbebett.
Emerging markets (Ems) are the focus of increasing interest in the field of international business, as they provide significant challenges and great opportunities. Focusing on the dynamics of emerging markets, this informative book provides an academically rigorous yet business-oriented analysis of the key issues in this area and incorporates chapters on: the nature of emerging markets market development integrating Ems in the global economy implications for business strategy. Providing an in-depth analysis of two of the most important Ems, China and India, this user-friendly text incorporates extensive case studies, boxed summaries, discussion questions and an extensive bibliography.

Best Books