First published in 1545, this cornerstone in the history of mathematics contains the first revelation of the principles for solving cubic and biquadratic equations. T. Richard Witmer's excellent translation from the Latin, adapted to modern mathematical syntax, will appeal to both mathematicians and historians. Foreword by Oystein Ore.
Prominent Russian mathematician's concise, well-written exposition considers n-dimensional spaces, linear and bilinear forms, linear transformations, canonical form of an arbitrary linear transformation, and an introduction to tensors. While not designed as an introductory text, the book's well-chosen topics, brevity of presentation, and the author's reputation will recommend it to all students, teachers, and mathematicians working in this sector.
One of the twentieth century's most eminent mathematical writers offers insights into some of the more neglected aspects of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. 1943 edition.
Lucid coverage of the major theories of abstract algebra, with helpful illustrations and exercises included throughout. Unabridged, corrected republication of the work originally published 1971. Bibliography. Index. Includes 24 tables and figures.
Mathematics was only one area of interest for Gerolamo Cardano ― the sixteenth-century astrologer, philosopher, and physician was also a prolific author and inveterate gambler. Gambling led Cardano to the study of probability, and he was the first writer to recognize that random events are governed by mathematical laws. Published posthumously in 1663, Cardano's Liber de ludo aleae (Book on Games of Chance) is often considered the major starting point of the study of mathematical probability. The Italian scholar formulated some of the field's basic ideas more than a century before the better-known correspondence of Pascal and Fermat. Although his book had no direct influence on other early thinkers about probability, it remains an important antecedent to later expressions of the science's tenets.
Within this two-volume edition, Professor Smith covers the entire history of mathematics in the Near and Far East and the West, from primitive number concepts to the calculus. His account is distinguished by impeccable scholarship combined with unusual clarity and readability. Footnotes add many technical points outside the book's actual line of development and direct the reader to disputed matters and source readings. Hundreds of illustrations from Egyptian papyri, Hindu, Chinese, and Japanese manuscripts, Greek and Roman texts, Medieval treatises, maps, portraits, etc. are used along with modern graphs and diagrams. Every major figure from Euclid to Descartes, Gauss, and Riemann and hundreds of lesser-known figures — Theon of Smyrna, Rabbi ben Ezra, Radulph of Laon, Mersenns, Benedetti, and more — are considered both with respect to specific problems and with an awareness of their overall influence on mathematics. Volume II: Special Topics, considering mathematics in terms of arithmetic geometry, algebra, trig, calculus, calculating machines, and other specific fields and problems. 192 Topics for Discussion. 195 illustrations. Index.
This highly readable volume covers a vast array of subjects, including number theory, topology, set theory, geometry, algebra, and analysis. Additional topics include primes, fundamental theory of arithmetic, rationals and irrationals, representation of numbers, congruence, probability, and more. A solutions manual is available upon request. 1994 edition.
A timeless introduction to the field and a landmark in symbolic logic, showing that classical logic can be treated algebraically.
This book arose out of the authors' desire to present Lebesgue integration and Fourier series on an undergraduate level, since most undergraduate texts do not cover this material or do so in a cursory way. The result is a clear, concise, well-organized introduction to such topics as the Riemann integral, measurable sets, properties of measurable sets, measurable functions, the Lebesgue integral, convergence and the Lebesgue integral, pointwise convergence of Fourier series and other subjects. The authors not only cover these topics in a useful and thorough way, they have taken pains to motivate the student by keeping the goals of the theory always in sight, justifying each step of the development in terms of those goals. In addition, whenever possible, new concepts are related to concepts already in the student's repertoire. Finally, to enable readers to test their grasp of the material, the text is supplemented by numerous examples and exercises. Mathematics students as well as students of engineering and science will find here a superb treatment, carefully thought out and well presented , that is ideal for a one semester course. The only prerequisite is a basic knowledge of advanced calculus, including the notions of compactness, continuity, uniform convergence and Riemann integration.
Uncommonly interesting introduction illuminates complexities of higher mathematics while offering a thorough understanding of elementary mathematics. Covers development of complex number system and elementary theories of numbers, polynomials and operations, determinants, matrices, constructions and graphical representations. Several exercises — without solutions.
This refreshingly authoritative look at recreational mathematics illustrates winning strategies that use the methods of algebra, geometry, combinatorics, number theory, graph theory, and other branches of mathematics. Its lucid analyses of the rules and theories of mathematical games include skill-enhancing exercises, plus references, appendixes, and detailed explanations. 1992 edition.
Unusually clear, accessible introduction covers counting, properties of numbers, prime numbers, Aliquot parts, Diophantine problems, congruences, much more. Bibliography.
An imaginative introduction to number theory and abstract algebra, this unique approach employs a pair of fictional characters whose dialogues explain theories and demonstrate applications in terms of football scoring, chess moves, and more.
Practical and applications-oriented, this text explains effective procedures for performing mathematical tasks that arise in many fields, including operations research, engineering, systems sciences, statistics, and economics. Most of the examples and many of the 1,300 problems illustrate techniques, and nearly all of the tables display reference material for procedures. 1978 edition.
This text focuses on the basics of algebraic theory, giving detailed explanations of integral functions, permutations, and groups, and Lagrange and Galois theory. Many numerical examples with complete solutions. 1930 edition.
This 4-part treatment begins with algebra and analytic geometry and proceeds to an exploration of the calculus of algebraic functions and transcendental functions and applications. 1985 edition. Includes 310 figures and 18 tables.
This lucid, non-intimidating presentation by a Russian scholar explores propositional logic, propositional calculus, and predicate logic. Topics include computer science and systems analysis, linguistics, and problems in the foundations of mathematics. Accessible to high school students, it also constitutes a valuable review of fundamentals for professionals. 1970 edition.
Introductory treatment begins with set theory and fundamentals of Boolean algebra, proceeding to concise accounts of applications to symbolic logic, switching circuits, relay circuits, binary arithmetic, and probability theory. 1961 edition.
Illustrated guide features practical and charming methods of studying and practicing math. From addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to algebra and geometry, this playful approach offers fun-to-solve problems and complete answers.
Part I of this coherent, well-organized text deals with formal principles of inference and definition. Part II explores elementary intuitive set theory, with separate chapters on sets, relations, and functions. Ideal for undergraduates.

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