The critically acclaimed New York Times–bestseller and the basis for the Academy Award– and Golden Globe–nominated film starring Steve McQueen. As a spirit of nationalism inspired by Chiang Kai-shek’s leadership begins to sweep through China, the river gunship San Pablo is ordered to patrol the region and to protect US citizens. Jack Holman is a machinist aboard the San Pablo, who has joined the navy in order to avoid jail time. Because he is so fiercely independent, Jake remains a relative loner and is uncomfortable with navy protocol and discipline. McKenna’s independent mind chafes against military hierarchy and also ensures that he does not share his shipmates’ disdain for the Chinese. Instead, McKenna is fascinated with the culture and the people that surround him and develops emotional bonds that prove quite thorny when the circumstances become more tumultuous and more dire. The perspective of The Sand Pebbles is therefore both panoramic as well as personal. Like Lawrence of Arabia, the tension explored here is between the self as individual against the broader spectrum of social and historical forces against which we are all measured. “A bold well-written book, inclusive in its concepts, memorable in character and incident, fearlessly impartial in its delineation of the incompatible sets of values held by the men on all sides.” —Kirkus Reviews
MY HUSBAND, MY FRIEND THE REAL STEVE McQUEEN - FROM ABANDONED CHILD TO GLITTERING SUPERSTAR TO HAUNTED MAN.... Now his wife of 15 and a half years, Neile, who rode the dazzling Hollywood roller coaster with him, reveals A Steve McQueen no one knew – his good side, his crazy side, his dark side....
In 1966, The Sand Pebbles captivated moviegoers across the United States, introducing many Americans to the little-known China Station of the 1920s. Based upon a novel by first-time novelist, Richard McKenna, the importance of The Sand Pebbles in contributing to popular history cannot be understated. Despite the importance of The Sand Pebbles, however, there is no book-length biography of its author. Brought to life by veteran historian Dennis Noble in this new book, McKenna’s life proved equally as fascinating as his novel. From his humble beginnings in poverty as a youth in Idaho (even living in a tent for a time) to his rise to chief petty officer in the Navy during World War II, McKenna’s unlikely rise to becoming a novelist was cut short by an untimely heart attack suffered while working on his second novel. In his biography, Noble not only chronicles McKenna’s life, but shows how it helped to illuminate the service of all those in the Navy between the 1930s and 1950s. With a number of never-before-published photographs of the author of The Sand Pebbles, it sheds new light on both the Navy of the time and one of the early American science fiction writers. This book also contains an exclusive McKenna short story, "Hour of Panic," written by McKenna and originally published in The Saturday Evening Post.
Sand and Pebbles presents the first complete English rendering of Shasekishu--the classic, popular Buddhist "Tale Literature" (setsuwa). This collection of instructive, yet often humorous, anecdotes appeared in the late thirteenth century, within decades of the first stirrings of the revolutionary movements of Kamakura Buddhism. Shasekishu's author, Muju Ichien (1226-1312), lived in a rural temple apart from the centers of political and literary activity, and his stories reflect the customs, attitudes and lifestyles of the commoners. In Sand and Pebbles, complete translations of Book One and other significant narrative parts are supplemented by summaries of the remaining (especially didactic) material and by excerpts from Muju's later work. Introduced by a historical sketch of the period, this work also contains a biography of Muju. Illustrations, charts, a chronology, glossary of terms, notes, an extensive bibliography and an index guide the reader into a seldom seen corner of old Japan. Muju and his writings will interest students of literature as well as scholars of Japanese religion, especially Buddhism. Anthropologists and sociologists will discover details of Kamakura life and thought unrecorded in the official chronicles of the age.
This is a book about the simple pleasure of pebble spotting. Clarence Ellis is a charming, knowledgeable and witty guide to everything you didn't know there was to know about pebbles. He ruminates on what a pebble actually is, before showing us how they are formed, advising on the best pebble-spotting grounds in the UK, helping to identify individual stones, and giving tips on the necessary kit. You'll know your chert from your schist, your onyx from your agate, and will be on your guard for artificial intruders before you know it. Understanding the humble pebble makes a trip to the beach, lake-side or river bank simply that little bit more fascinating.
Selections from the author's uncompleted second novel and stories about a lonely warrant officer, a crafty sailor, and a proud engineer are accompanied by essays about historical research and naval life and reform
In this entertaining history of the Yangtze Patrol, Tolley gives a lively presentation of the Chinese political situation over the past century and describes the bombing of the Panay, the siege of Shanghai, the battle of Wanhsien, and the Nanking incident. He also offers a liberal serving of colorful anecdotes and numerous period photographs.
The tale of a broken heart's awakening to hope. A moving, richly told story set in a small fishing village in coastal North Carolina, Patricia Hickman's novel portrays a witty, recently widowed herione who must learn to let go of the past--and discover God's surprising, renewing provision for her future.
In early December 1941 in the Philippines, a young Navy ensign named Kemp Tolley was given his first ship command, an old 76-foot schooner that had once served as a movie prop in John Ford's "The Hurricane." Crewed mostly by Filipinos who did not speak English and armed with a cannon that had last seen service in the Spanish-American War, the Lanikai was under top-secret presidential orders to sail south into waters where the Japanese fleet was thought to be. Ostensibly the crew was to spy on Japanese naval movements, but to Tolley it was clear that their mission was to create an incident that would provoke war. Events overtook the plan, however, when Pearl Harbor was bombed before the Lanikai could get underway. When Bataan and Corregidor fell, she was ordered to set sail for Australia and became one of the few U.S. naval vessels to escape the Philippines. In this book Tolley tells the saga of her great adventure during these grim, early days of the war and makes history come alive as he regales the reader with details of the operation and an explanation of President Roosevelt's order. Tolley's description of their escape in Japanese warship-infested waters ranks with the best of sea tales, and few will be able to forget the Lanikai's 4,000-mile, three-month odyssey.
From the end of the 19th century through the first half of the 20th, most Western powers maintained a naval presence in China. These gunboats protected traders and missionaries, safeguarded national interests, and patrolled Chinese rivers in search of pirates. It was a wild, lawless time in China as ruthless warlords fought numerous small wars to increase their power and influence. This book covers the gunboats of all the major nations that stationed naval forces in China, including America, Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, and Japan, and looks at such famous incidents as the Japanese bombing of the USS Patay and the dramatic escape of the HMS Amethyst from Communist forces in 1947, which marked the end of the gunboat era.
British artist Steve McQueen has gained an international reputation for his original short films. Using sound, light, architecture, and sculptural form, McQueen probes the possibilities and boundaries of the moving image. Included in this exhibition catalogue are stills from his most recent works, Deadpan (1997), a hypnotic recreation of a classic Buster Keaton routine, and Drumroll (1998), a multi-screen color work which records the dizzying journey of a barrel as it rolls through the streets of Manhattan. This is the first substantial catalogue dedicated to McQueen's work, and contains critical essays by Robert Storr, Michael Newman, and Okwui Enwezor.
Using the simple visual analogy of "moving rocks" and "pushing sand" the author creates a model that helps business owners, executives, and entrepreneurs understand the connection between strategy and execution while giving guidance on what to do about it. It's easy to follow, compelling, and very practical. Better yet, readers won't get caught up in case studies or examples that are interesting but not applicable to their situation. Rock & Sand takes business strategy and execution down to it's essence and links them together. The "Rock and Sand" model challenges the "myth" of strategic complexity and simplifies its execution, paving the way to business growth. It's a book that is long overdue.
Originally published by Linden Press in 1984.
The first full-length, authoritative, and detailed story of the iconic actor's life to go beyond the Hollywood scandal-sheet reporting of earlier books, this account offers an appreciation for the man and his acting career and the classic films he starred in, painting a portrait of an individual who took great risks in his acting and career. Although Lee Marvin is best known for his icy tough guy roles—such as his chilling titular villain in The ManWho Shot Liberty Valance or the paternal yet brutally realistic platoon leader in The Big Red One—very little is known of his personal life; his family background; his experiences in WWII; his relationship with his father, family, friends, wives; and his ongoing battles with alcoholism, rage, and depression, occasioned by his postwar PTSD. Now, after years of researching and compiling interviews with family members, friends, and colleagues; rare photographs; and illustrative material, Hollywood writer Dwayne Epstein provides a full understanding and appreciation of this acting titan's place in the Hollywood pantheon in spite of his very real and human struggles.
In this narrative of the Earth's long and dramatic history, Jan Zalasiewicz shows how many events in the Earth's ancient past can be deciphered from a single pebble. He explores how geologists reach deep into the past by forensic analysis of even the tiniest amounts of mineral matter, demonstrating and revealing Earth's extraordinary story.
One moment Joseph Schwartz is a happily retired tailor in Chicago, 1949. The next he's a helpless stranger on Earth during the heyday of the first Galactic Empire. Earth, as he soon learns, is a backwater, just a pebble in the sky, despised by all the other 200 million planets of the Empire because its people dare to claim it's the original home of man. And Earth is poor, with great areas of radioactivity ruining much of its soil--so poor that everyone is sentenced to death at the age of sixty. Joseph Schwartz is sixty-two. This is young Isaac Asimov's first novel, full of wonders and ideas, the book that launched the novels of the Galactic Empire, culminating in the Foundation series. This is Golden Age SF at its finest. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
The most detailed and revealing biography to date of a Hollywood great. Steve McQueen is that rare Hollywood combination of a classic actor and a style icon in the tradition of James Dean. ‘ The King of Cool’ , as he was dubbed, was at one time the highest-paid film star in the world, a status earned through his roles in films like The Magnificent Seven, Bullitt, The Thomas Crown Affair and The Great Escape. But he also turned down at least as many roles in classic films, including Breakfast at Tiffany’ s, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and The French Connection. This is the first biography to cover in detail every film that McQueen made, and to put him into the context of the movie business, showing how he had problems trying to be a Method actor where an exact contemporary like Clint Eastwood thrived at it, and how Eastwood understood the studio system and made it work for him, while an insecure McQueen struggled with his sense of himself, both on and off screen. It includes interviews with people who have never spoken about him before, and draws upon diaries in the private McQueen collection.

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