As rates of depression, anxiety, self-harm and eating disorders are on the up among young people, how can schools provide appropriate information and support for the young people in their classrooms? How can they bridge the gap between what they know matters - the impact of these issues on learning and life-long health - and the mounting day-to-day priorities and pressures of school life? This book provides unique insight into 12 projects that are helping to answer these questions and supporting teachers to make mental health and emotional wellbeing a key player in the school day. With a mix of longer-term initiatives and simple strategies that schools can put in place immediately, it explores mentoring and mindfulness, social action and sport, Lego play and poetry, the power of parents and the role of PSHE. It describes how these projects work practically and shares the impact they are having, increasing resilience and raising the aspirations and emotional wellbeing of the whole school community. As well as showcasing ideas that are making a difference, the book meets with the education leaders and charities behind the initiatives (including Place2Be, Step up to Serve, Kidscape, Mosaic, Diversity Role Models, Beat, Achievement for All and others) who offer advice and signpost useful information to support readers in getting these ideas off the ground in their schools. This book is a source of inspiration for headteachers, senior leadership teams, pastoral care teams, school counsellors and psychologists.
Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools brings together international experts from various disciplines to identify and address a range of current challenges in this rapidly-developing field of endeavour. The opening chapter details lessons learned from research and practice, outlining some emerging challenges for the effective implementation of mental health initiatives in schools. Subsequent chapters take up the various issues, exploring problems and proposing solutions. Topics fall within four broad areas: Organisational and leadership issues such as dealing with 'wicked' or ‘hard-to-tame’ (complex and resistant) problems and taking a broad public health approach; Teacher-related issues, such as how to integrate programs successfully into schools, and teacher skills and professional learning; The challenges and opportunities of new technologies, including cyberbullying and the use of online, multimedia and mobile resources for both student and teacher learning and support; The need for a greater focus on targeted interventions for at-risk students, such as those with disabilities; also addressing ‘hard-to-tame’ problems such as bullying, youth suicide and depression. Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools will be of interest to those involved in researching, developing, evaluating and implementing mental health initiatives in schools, including academics, practitioners, educators and educational and Mental Health policy makers. It will also be of use to professionals, such as nurses and social workers, concerned with the wellbeing of children and adolescents. The book will have international appeal, with contributors from around the world, experienced in a range of contexts. Rosalyn H. Shute is Adjunct Professor of Psychology at both Flinders and Federation Universities (Australia). Her research expertise lies broadly in clinical child psychology and paediatric psychology/child health and wellbeing. She is an experienced teacher of Developmental Psychology, educational and clinical child/paediatric psychology. Phillip T. Slee is a Professor in Human Development in the School of Education at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. He is a trained teacher and registered psychologist. His main areas of interest include childhood bullying/aggression, mental health and wellbeing, stress and teacher education. He has a particular interest in the practical and policy implications of his research. He and Shute recently co-authored Child Development: Theories and Critical Perspectives.
This handbook addresses universal developmental and cultural factors contributing to child and adolescent mental health and well-being across the globe. It examines sociocultural contexts of development and identifies children's and adolescents' perspectives as critical to understanding and promoting their psychological well-being. It details the Promoting Psychological Well-Being Globally project’s methodology for data collection and analysis, provides cross-cultural analyses of its findings, and offers a practical model for clinicians and other professionals seeking to apply this knowledge to real-life settings. Featured topics include: Sexual health, gender roles, and psychological well-being in India. Psychological well-being as a new educational boundary in Italy. Mapping psychological well-being in Romania. Youth perspectives on contributing factors to psychological well-being in Sri Lanka. Culturally specific res ilience and vulnerability in Tanzania. Longing for a balanced life – the voices of Chinese-American/immigrant youth in the United States. The International Handbook of Psychological Well-Being in Children and Adolescents: Bridging the Gaps Between Theory, Research, and Practice is an invaluable resources for researchers, clinicians, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in child and school psychology, social work, public health, positive psychology, educational policy and politics, and maternal and child health.
Offering authoritative advice on effective intervention, Promoting Health and Wellbeing through Schools provides an overview of the key issues that need to be addressed.
Supporting the Well being of Girls will provide teachers, psychologists, youth workers and learning mentors with an evidence based approach to the vitally important task of supporting and maintaining the well being of girls. This tried and tested programme offers teachers in upper primary and secondary schools sixteen tailored, expert sessions which engage girls and young women in tackling and addressing some of their key concerns and issues. Written by hugely experienced educational psychologists, the sessions utilise tools and strategies from a range of therapeutic interventions including cognitive behavioural therapy and positive psychology to provide a safe and nurturing environment in which to consider some sensitive issues and ultimately providing young women with the strength and self awareness to maintain overall well-being. Areas covered include:- • Body image and appearance • Bullying • Mental health, anxiety and depression • Relationships • Stereotypes • Self-harm • Stress • Healthy Living Throughout, clear guidance is offered to teachers on running sessions including, welcome and ground rules, talk time and inviting students to share experiences, ice-breakers, activities and feedback. This programme of support also includes a full range of support tools for the school including:- • Information sheet for students • Information sheet for parents • Letter to parents • Mental health fact sheet • Referral routes to specialist agencies • Mental health agencies – contact details • Policy for schools on developing mental health work
The mental health and emotional wellbeing of children is fantastically important. It has a huge impact on learning and development and more and more, there is recognition of the importance of mental health for everyone. Despite this, many school staff feel overwhelmed and lack confidence when it comes to dealing with these issues in their classrooms. This new text is written for all those working in primary schools. It supports schools to develop strategies to enhance the importance of mental health and emotional wellbeing, to work on preventative strategies and to support children when they need more intervention. The text explores what we mean by mental health and wellbeing. Many children will not reach the threshold for clinical diagnosis, but they nonetheless need support. This text will outline lots of effective strategies for working with children who are struggling to manage the school day. It offers advice for engaging meaningfully with parents and considers the importance of working with school staff to ensure they are fully supported.
This book focuses on well-being at school in association with positive peer relationships and bullying. Taking an integrative and community-based approach, the book outlines the significance of student-school relationships for well-being and emphasizes the importance of school and classroom climate for promoting well-being. Embedded in research and theory, the book reflects the belief that all of our dealings with children and young people in whatever role, whether as parent or teacher or in some other capacity, are bounded by theory, either implicit or explicit. The book highlights the role of partnerships and linkages in addressing school-based well-being and anti-bullying programs. It pays special attention to the barriers and facilitators that schools must address in engaging with external agencies to deliver strong evidence-based initiatives. The international concern with school bullying is given particular consideration in relation to its impact on the well-being of all involved. A feature of the text is the focus given to the implementation of programs into the busy and complex world of schools and classrooms recognizing that the effectiveness and impact of any school-based program is strongly related to the quality of its implementation. The text reflects a commitment of the authors to a broad-based systemic view of development, taking into account family, school, community and culture as influential factors. The text incorporates a number of pedagogical features e.g. classroom based activities and discussion starters, reflections on points raised in the text, and case studies. This book is of special interest to teachers, school counselors, educational psychologists and mental health professionals working in school settings.
The School Practitioner's Concise Companion gives busy social workers, psychologists, and counselors a quick guide to accessible, proven solutions for their students' most common problems. Built around the expert advice from the acclaimed School Services Sourcebook, each volume is a rapid reference to a key school issue. Here, readers will find an overview of adolescent health issues and step-by-step prevention and intervention guidance. This Concise Companion covers major health issues that affect students' well-being-from substance abuse to STDs to obesity-and presents innovative, effective strategies to improve student health by addressing risky behaviors. Each chapter is filled with charts, checklists, and cases and is conveniently organized around What We Know, What We Can Do, Tools and Practice Examples, and Key Points to Remember. A portable catalog of best practices, it brings evidence-based practice within easy reach of school professionals.
As the third volume in the series including The Hidden Ground of Love (1985) and The Road to Joy (1989), this collection features Thomas Merton's letters to members of religious communities around the world. Merton's questions about the monastic life, sometimes radical and disturbing, either arose from what was happening in his own experience or reflected the extraordinary changes that followed Vatican Council II.
Drawing on extensive fieldwork in nine African countries, this volume offers different perspectives on the emerging markets for well-being. The chapters discuss how medical staff, patients and citizins navigate markets for health and healing.
Based on action research and implementation at one of the world’s great schools, this book provides a much-needed exploration of how to implement positive education at a whole school level. Evidence-Based Approaches in Positive Education summarises the integration of a whole-school mental health and well-being strategy, positive psychology programs and pastoral care models from 3 – 18 years of age. Positive education is the teaching of scientifically validated programs from positive psychology and character education that have an impact on student and staff well-being. It is an approach that focuses on teaching, building and embedding social and emotional learning throughout a student’s experience. St Peter’s College - Adelaide is the only institution in the world to integrate Martin Seligman’s well-being theory throughout all aspects of both its strategic intent and positive education programs. The School’s vision is to be a world-class school where all boys flourish. Its mission is to provide an exceptional education that brings out the very best in every boy. This is done within an intellectually and spiritually rich environment that nurtures international-mindedness, intercultural understanding, respect and a commitment to social justice. This book captures the developments of the St Peter’s College journey. It focuses on the integration of well-being across seven strategic goals: Academics; Well-being; Student Life; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Partnerships; People, Culture and Change; Sustainability and Environment; Community Engagement, Advancement, and Philanthropy. A uniquely Australian school, the impact of a St Peter’s College education is to build great men: who believe safety, service and integrity and fundamental parts of their lives; who are active members of communities that are socially and culturally diverse; who engage in political, ethical, and environmental challenges as good citizens. Since 1847, St Peter’s College alumni have had global and life-changing impact in all fields of human endeavour. The School’s alumni include three Nobel Laureates, 42 Rhodes Scholars, Olympians and Archbishops, artists and scientists, educators and journalists, actors and politicians, philanthropists and physicians, CEOs, diplomats and soldiers, explorers, painters and poets. This book shares evidence-based practices and makes a substantial contribution to the rapidly developing field of positive psychology and its application in schools.
Part of the six-volume Wellbeing: A Complete ReferenceGuide, this is a comprehensive look at the economics ofwellbeing with coverage of history, research, policy, andpractice. Examines the challenges inherent in studying and measuringwellbeing from an economic perspective Discusses strategies and interventions to improve wellbeingacross the lifespan and in different settings Addresses the potential economic benefits for governments andpolicymakers of actively investing in initiatives to improvewellbeing, from the workplace to the home to the naturalenvironment Emphasizes the need to strengthen the evidence base for theeconomics of wellbeing and improve methods for translating researchinto policy and practice
Child well-being, which covers everything from family relationships to their material well-being, is now increasingly being talked about in policy and practice nationally and internationally. However, a lack of clarity remains about what the idea really means and how it can help children. This book brings together contributions from international experts in order to define child well-being and to further understand how it can improve children's lives. Issues covered include how the idea is being used in government policy and practice in the UK and USA, how children can contribute to the understanding of child well-being, recent advances in the exploration of indicators and measures of well-being, and the importance of context in making comparisons. A concluding chapter explores whether child well-being is a useful concept in understanding children's lives, whether it positively contributes to policy and practice, and the value of international comparisons. This edited collection is essential reading for all those involved in understanding children's lives and who have responsibility for improving them, including practitioners, policymakers, students and academics.
This brief defines student wellbeing and outlines seven evidence-informed pathways that schools can take to promote student wellbeing and develop their school as an enabling institution. The acronym PROSPER is applied as an organizer for both the psychological elements of wellbeing and for these Positive Education pathways. These pathways focus on encouraging Positivity, building Relationships, facilitating Outcomes and a sense of competence, focusing on Strengths, fostering a sense of Purpose, enhancing Engagement and teaching Resilience. Each pathway draws on both the principles of positive psychology and the educational research that identifies the impact of each pathway for student learning. The benefits of a school-wide focus on student wellbeing for student engagement in learning and their success in school and in life are outlined. Practical guidelines for the development and implementation of educational policy that has student wellbeing as its central focus are also provided.
the success of nations, communities and individuals are linked, more than ever before, to how they adapt to change, learn and share knowledge. This report helps clarify the concepts of human and social capital and evaluates their impact on economic growth and well-being.
The American Time Use Survey (ATUS), conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, included a subjective well-being (SWB) module in 2010 and 2012. The module, funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), is being considered for inclusion in the ATUS for 2013. The National Research Council was asked to evaluate measures of self-reported well-being and offer guidance about their adoption in official government surveys. The charge for the study included an interim report to consider the usefulness of the ATUS SWB module, specifically the value of continuing it for at least one more wave. Among the key points raised in this report are the value, methodological benefits, and cost and effects on the ATUS and new opportunities. Research on subjective or self-reported well-being has been ongoing for several decades, with the past few years seeing an increased interest by some countries in using SWB measures to evaluate government policies and provide a broader assessment of the health of a society than is provided by such standard economic measures as gross domestic product. NIA asked the panel to prepare an interim report on the usefulness of the SWB module of the ATUS, with a view as to the utility of continuing the module in 2013. The Subjective Well-Being Module of the American Time Use Survey is intended to fulfill only one narrow aspect of the panel's broader task. It provides an overview of the ATUS and the SWB module, a brief discussion of research applications to date, and a preliminary assessment of the value of SWB module data. The panel's final report will address issues of whether research has advanced to the point that SWB measures-and which kinds of measures-should be regularly included in major surveys of official statistical agencies to help inform government economic and social policies.
Using an evidence-based approach and case studies from a wide range of life domains, Interventions and Policies to Enhance Wellbeing examines the most successful existing strategies to promote wellbeing and mental health. Discusses the results of the latest research in the science of wellbeing and their implications for improved learning, creativity, productivity, relationships, and health Covers interventions for individuals across the lifespan, as well as those for organizations, communities, and entire populations Looks at policy initiatives and approaches with a focus on the integration of new technology and the role of the media Part of the six-volume Wellbeing: A Complete Reference Guide, which brings together leading research from across the social sciences
This reader compares up-to-date policy and research evidence from the UK and USA on the effectiveness of core child welfare interventions. The text shows how knowledge of effective interventions can be used to improve assessment of needs, and planning and reviewing services to children and their families.
An interdisciplinary examination of how well American families and children are faring at the start of the third millennium

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