As rates of depression, anxiety, self-harm and eating disorders are on the up among young people, how can schools provide appropriate information and support for the young people in their classrooms? How can they bridge the gap between what they know matters - the impact of these issues on learning and life-long health - and the mounting day-to-day priorities and pressures of school life? This book provides unique insight into 12 projects that are helping to answer these questions and supporting teachers to make mental health and emotional wellbeing a key player in the school day. With a mix of longer-term initiatives and simple strategies that schools can put in place immediately, it explores mentoring and mindfulness, social action and sport, Lego play and poetry, the power of parents and the role of PSHE. It describes how these projects work practically and shares the impact they are having, increasing resilience and raising the aspirations and emotional wellbeing of the whole school community. As well as showcasing ideas that are making a difference, the book meets with the education leaders and charities behind the initiatives (including Place2Be, Step up to Serve, Kidscape, Mosaic, Diversity Role Models, Beat, Achievement for All and others) who offer advice and signpost useful information to support readers in getting these ideas off the ground in their schools. This book is a source of inspiration for headteachers, senior leadership teams, pastoral care teams, school counsellors and psychologists.
Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools brings together international experts from various disciplines to identify and address a range of current challenges in this rapidly-developing field of endeavour. The opening chapter details lessons learned from research and practice, outlining some emerging challenges for the effective implementation of mental health initiatives in schools. Subsequent chapters take up the various issues, exploring problems and proposing solutions. Topics fall within four broad areas: Organisational and leadership issues such as dealing with 'wicked' or ‘hard-to-tame’ (complex and resistant) problems and taking a broad public health approach; Teacher-related issues, such as how to integrate programs successfully into schools, and teacher skills and professional learning; The challenges and opportunities of new technologies, including cyberbullying and the use of online, multimedia and mobile resources for both student and teacher learning and support; The need for a greater focus on targeted interventions for at-risk students, such as those with disabilities; also addressing ‘hard-to-tame’ problems such as bullying, youth suicide and depression. Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools will be of interest to those involved in researching, developing, evaluating and implementing mental health initiatives in schools, including academics, practitioners, educators and educational and Mental Health policy makers. It will also be of use to professionals, such as nurses and social workers, concerned with the wellbeing of children and adolescents. The book will have international appeal, with contributors from around the world, experienced in a range of contexts. Rosalyn H. Shute is Adjunct Professor of Psychology at both Flinders and Federation Universities (Australia). Her research expertise lies broadly in clinical child psychology and paediatric psychology/child health and wellbeing. She is an experienced teacher of Developmental Psychology, educational and clinical child/paediatric psychology. Phillip T. Slee is a Professor in Human Development in the School of Education at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. He is a trained teacher and registered psychologist. His main areas of interest include childhood bullying/aggression, mental health and wellbeing, stress and teacher education. He has a particular interest in the practical and policy implications of his research. He and Shute recently co-authored Child Development: Theories and Critical Perspectives.
Based on action research and implementation at one of the world’s great schools, this book provides a much-needed exploration of how to implement positive education at a whole school level. Evidence-Based Approaches in Positive Education summarises the integration of a whole-school mental health and well-being strategy, positive psychology programs and pastoral care models from 3 – 18 years of age. Positive education is the teaching of scientifically validated programs from positive psychology and character education that have an impact on student and staff well-being. It is an approach that focuses on teaching, building and embedding social and emotional learning throughout a student’s experience. St Peter’s College - Adelaide is the only institution in the world to integrate Martin Seligman’s well-being theory throughout all aspects of both its strategic intent and positive education programs. The School’s vision is to be a world-class school where all boys flourish. Its mission is to provide an exceptional education that brings out the very best in every boy. This is done within an intellectually and spiritually rich environment that nurtures international-mindedness, intercultural understanding, respect and a commitment to social justice. This book captures the developments of the St Peter’s College journey. It focuses on the integration of well-being across seven strategic goals: Academics; Well-being; Student Life; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Partnerships; People, Culture and Change; Sustainability and Environment; Community Engagement, Advancement, and Philanthropy. A uniquely Australian school, the impact of a St Peter’s College education is to build great men: who believe safety, service and integrity and fundamental parts of their lives; who are active members of communities that are socially and culturally diverse; who engage in political, ethical, and environmental challenges as good citizens. Since 1847, St Peter’s College alumni have had global and life-changing impact in all fields of human endeavour. The School’s alumni include three Nobel Laureates, 42 Rhodes Scholars, Olympians and Archbishops, artists and scientists, educators and journalists, actors and politicians, philanthropists and physicians, CEOs, diplomats and soldiers, explorers, painters and poets. This book shares evidence-based practices and makes a substantial contribution to the rapidly developing field of positive psychology and its application in schools.
Wellbeing, Education and Contemporary Schooling examines the role of wellbeing in schools and argues that it should be integral to core policy objectives in health and education. The whole school focus chosen is conducive to the review of wellbeing in schools, and assists in better understanding the complex relationships between learners and teachers in policy contexts, where every teacher has a responsibility for learners’ wellbeing. By exploring a range of debates about the nature of wellbeing, the book shows how a child’s wellbeing is inseparable from their overall capacity to learn and achieve, and to become confident, self-assured and active citizens. Drawing on international curriculum developments, it considers the ways in which wellbeing could reshape educational aims in areas such as outdoor learning and aesthetic imagination, helping to inform programmes of professional learning for teachers. Separated into six parts, the book covers: philosophical perspectives on wellbeing policy perspectives on wellbeing professional perspectives on wellbeing practice perspectives on wellbeing future prospects for wellbeing a personal perspective on wellbeing. Examining ways in which wellbeing can become a central component of the ethos, culture and environment of contemporary schools, Wellbeing, Education and Contemporary Schooling is an invaluable guide for all students, teachers, researchers and policy makers with an interest in learning, teaching and children’s wellbeing.
This invaluable book offers a comprehensive guide for educators in understanding and promoting wellbeing and violence prevention initiatives in schools and communities. Ittranslates research and theory into practice with a strong evidence-based application. The book is presented in five thematic sections, namely: culture and wellbeing; young females and wellbeing; bullying; cyberbullying and student violence; interventions to promote wellbeing; and interventions to promote violence prevention. An introductory chapter provides an overview of the field and a commentary chapter draws the five themes together. Written by experienced researchers and educators, each of the 21 chapters provides practical information and research on school, classroom or community applications, trends and issues in the field, and practical ideas for wellbeing and violence prevention measures. Issues of culture, gender and youth voice are specifically addressed.
Something is missing in contemporary health and social care. Health and illness is often measured in policy documents in economic terms, and clinical outcomes are enmeshed in statistical data, with the patient’s experience left to one side. This stimulating book is concerned with how to humanise health and social care and keep the person at the centre of practice. Caring and Well-Being opens by articulating Galvin and Todres’ innovative framework for humanising health care and closes with a synthesis of their argument and a discussion of how this can be applied in healthcare policy and practice. It: presents an innovative lifeworld-led approach to the humanisation of care; explores the concept of well-being and its relationship to suffering and outlines the rationale for a focus on them within this approach; discusses how the framework can be applied and how health and social practitioners can draw on aesthetic and empathic avenues to help develop their capacity for care; provides direction for policy, practice and education. Investigating what it means to be human in a health and social care context and what the things that make us feel more human are, this book presents new perspectives about how professionals can enhance their capacity for humanly sensitive care. It is a valuable work for all those interested in ideas about care and caring in a health and social context, including psychologists, doctors and nurses.
This updated edition is a theoretical and practical guide to implementing a well-being programme in your school. The book covers three areas: well-being as a philosophy of education, the teaching approach to well-being and the content that might form a well-being programme in a school. It is also a manifesto for a meaningful aim to education. There has recently been an explosion of interest in positive psychology and the teaching of well-being and 'happiness' in the PSHE world in schools and many teachers are looking for clear information on how to implement these potentially life-changing ideas in the classroom. This book provides an introduction to the theory of positive psychology and a practical guide on how to implement the theory in (primarily secondary) schools. It is written by Ian Morris who worked under Anthony Seldon at Wellington College which is well-known for its well-being and happiness curriculum.
Evidence has shown that happy people (those who experience more positive emotions) perform better in school, enjoy healthier relationships, are generally more successful and even live longer! It is an ever-growing concern, therefore, that children's levels of happiness and wellbeing are decreasing, while their levels of stress, anxiety and depression are increasing. As a result, many schools and teachers are looking for accessible ways to address these mental health problems in young people. In this practical and thoughtful book, experienced teacher and advisor on children's wellbeing, Adrian Bethune, takes the latest evidence and research from the science of happiness and positive psychology and brings them to life. Wellbeing in the Primary Classroom is packed full of tried-and-tested activities and techniques and has a foreword by Sir Anthony Seldon, former Master of Wellington College, well known for introducing and advocating happiness and wellbeing in education. It is an essential guide to supporting emotional and mental wellbeing in the primary classroom.
All human beings have spontaneous needs for happiness, self-understanding, and love. In Feeling Good: The Science of Well Being, psychiatrist Robert Cloninger describes a way to coherent living that satisfies these strong basic needs through growth in the uniquely human gift of self-awareness. The scientific findings that led Dr. Cloninger to expand his own views in a stepwise manner during 30 years of research and clinical experience are clearly presented so that readers can consider the validity of his viewpoint for themselves. The principles of well-being are based on a non-reductive scientific paradigm that integrates findings from all the biomedical and psychosocial sciences. Reliable methods are described for measuring human thought and social relationships at each step along the path of self-aware consciousness. Practical mental exercises for stimulating the growth of self-awareness are also provided. The methods are supported by data from brain imaging, genetics of personality, and longitudinal biopsychosocial studies. Feeling Good: The Science of Well-Being will be of value to anyone involved in the sciences of the mind or the treatment of mental disorders. It will also interest theologians, philosophers, social scientists, and lay readers because it provides contemporary scientific concepts and language for addressing the perennial human questions about being, knowledge, and conduct.
An investigation of the happiness-prosperity connection and whether economists can measure well-being.
Well-being, happiness and quality of life are now established objects of social and medical research. Does this science produce knowledge that is properly about well-being? What sort of well-being? The definition and measurement of these objects rest on assumptions that are partly normative, partly empirical and partly pragmatic, producing a great diversity of definitions depending on the project and the discipline. This book, written from the perspective of philosophy of science, formulates principles for the responsible production and interpretation of this diverse knowledge. Traditionally, philosophers' goal has been a single concept of well-being and a single theory about what it consists in. But for science this goal is both unlikely and unnecessary. Instead the promise and authority of the science depends on it focusing on the well-being of specific kinds of people in specific contexts. Skeptical arguments notwithstanding, this contexual well-being can be measured in a valid and credible way - but only if scientists broaden their methods to make room for normative considerations and address publicly and inclusively the value-based conflicts that inevitably arise when a measure of well-being is adopted. The science of well-being can be normative, empirical and objective all at once, provided that we line up values to science and science to values.
This book explores the power music has to address health inequalities and the social determinants of health and wellbeing. It examines music participation as a determinant of wellbeing and as a transformative tool to impact on wider social, cultural and environmental conditions. Uniquely, in this volume health and wellbeing outcomes are conceptualised on a continuum, with potential effects identified in relation to individual participants, their communities but also society at large. While arts therapy approaches have a clear place in the text, the emphasis is on music making outside of clinical contexts and the broader roles musicians, music facilitators and educators can play in enhancing wellbeing in a range of settings beyond the therapy room. This innovative edited collection will be of great interest to scholars and practitioners of music, social services, medical humanities, education and the broader health field in the social and medical sciences.
Western psychology is rooted in the philosophies and epistemologies of Western culture. But what of concepts and insights from outside this frame of reference? Certain terms not easily translatable into English -- for example, nirva?a (from Sanskrit), or agápe (from Classical Greek), or turangawaewae (from Maori) -- are rich with meaning but largely unavailable to English-speaking students and seekers of wellbeing. In this book, Tim Lomas argues that engaging with "untranslatable" terms related to well-being can enrich not only our understanding but also our experience. We can use these words, Lomas suggests, to understand and express feelings and experiences that were previously inexpressible. Lomas examines 400 words from 80 languages, arranges them thematically, and develops a theoretical framework that highlights the varied dimensions of well-being and traces the connections between them. He identifies three basic dimensions of well-being -- feelings, relationships, and personal development -- and then explores each in turn through untranslatable words. Ânanda, for example, usually translated as bliss, can have spiritual associations in Buddhist and Hindu contexts; kefi in Greek expresses an intense emotional state -- often made more intense by alcohol. The Japanese concept of koi no yokan means a premonition or presentiment of love, capturing the elusive and vertiginous feeling of being about to fall for someone, imbued with melancholy and uncertainty; the Yiddish term mensch has been borrowed from its Judaic and religious connotations to describe an all-around good human being; and Finnish offers sisu -- inner determination in the face of adversity. Expanding the lexicon of well-being in this way showcases the richness of cultural diversity while reminding us powerfully of our common humanity. Lomas's website, www.drtimlomas.com/lexicography, allows interested readers to contribute their own words and interpretations.
Do you experience stress? Are you interested in better health and well-being? Do you pursue happiness? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you need to read this book. If you answered no, you’re in denial. All of us can use a little help to become happier or healthier. Unfortunately, the help we get is often too scary: “if you don’t do this or that, some catastrophic event of epic proportions will happen.” Prilleltensky’s approach, in contrast, is to help you become healthier and happier through laughter. In this hilarious book, Prilleltensky combines humor with science to help you improve your well-being. Each chapter consists of the Laughing Side, a series of funny stories; and the Learning Side, a research-based, user-friendly guide to health and happiness. The first chapter provides an overview of well-being, while subsequent chapters cover each of its six domains: Interpersonal, Community, Occupational, Physical, Psychological, and Economic (I COPPE). When you finish the book you’ll have a greater understanding of your life, and ways to make it better.
Academic staff and students within higher education settings are confronted by a learning environment that is academically stimulating, informative, career-focused and socially rich, which can be intensely competitive and highly charged. Within this learning environment, academic staff and students are often at risk of compromising their wellbeing in their pursuit of academic excellence. This book provides an examination of the key areas that are important to the sustenance of wellbeing within higher education settings, with a view to promoting healthy learning environments. The chapter authors are predominantly working in the Asia-Pacific rim, but the book also includes more universal perspectives. The synthesis of the issues covered in the book is crucial to the understanding of higher education as not only an environment for gaining knowledge and skills relevant for success in academic and career domains, but also as an environment for developing socially adept and authentic communication skills. The ideas presented in this book will further assist academic staff and students to consider ways to more fully participate in their learning environment so that they can optimize their valuable contributions to the professional communities they serve.
What makes people happy? Why should governments care about people’s well-being? How would policy change if well-being was the main objective? The Origins of Happiness seeks to revolutionize how we think about human priorities and to promote public policy changes that are based on what really matters to people. Drawing on a uniquely comprehensive range of evidence from longitudinal data on over one hundred thousand individuals in Britain, the United States, Australia, and Germany, the authors consider the key factors that affect human well-being. The authors explore factors such as income, education, employment, family conflict, health, childcare, and crime—and their findings are not what we might expect. Contrary to received wisdom, income inequality accounts for only two percent or less of the variance in happiness across the population; the critical factors affecting a person’s happiness are their relationships and their mental and physical health. More people are in misery due to mental illness than to poverty, unemployment, or physical illness. Examining how childhood influences happiness in adulthood, the authors show that academic performance is a less important predictor than emotional health and behavior, which is shaped tremendously by schools, individual teachers, and parents. For policymakers, the authors propose new forms of cost-effectiveness analysis that places well-being at center stage. Groundbreaking in its scope and results, The Origins of Happiness offers all of us a new vision for how we might become more healthy, happy, and whole.
This book focuses on well-being at school in association with positive peer relationships and bullying. Taking an integrative and community-based approach, the book outlines the significance of student-school relationships for well-being and emphasizes the importance of school and classroom climate for promoting well-being. Embedded in research and theory, the book reflects the belief that all of our dealings with children and young people in whatever role, whether as parent or teacher or in some other capacity, are bounded by theory, either implicit or explicit. The book highlights the role of partnerships and linkages in addressing school-based well-being and anti-bullying programs. It pays special attention to the barriers and facilitators that schools must address in engaging with external agencies to deliver strong evidence-based initiatives. The international concern with school bullying is given particular consideration in relation to its impact on the well-being of all involved. A feature of the text is the focus given to the implementation of programs into the busy and complex world of schools and classrooms recognizing that the effectiveness and impact of any school-based program is strongly related to the quality of its implementation. The text reflects a commitment of the authors to a broad-based systemic view of development, taking into account family, school, community and culture as influential factors. The text incorporates a number of pedagogical features e.g. classroom based activities and discussion starters, reflections on points raised in the text, and case studies. This book is of special interest to teachers, school counselors, educational psychologists and mental health professionals working in school settings.
With this guide to mindful practice, teachers will learn how to use mindfulness in their own professional and personal lives as well as how to incorporate it in their teaching to support student wellbeing.
This book is a collection of essays advancing the discourse in well-being science, authored by key thought leaders in positive psychology and its variants, including positive education, character education, and positive organizational scholarship. The authors address topics such as the next big ideas in well-being research and practice, potential strategies , as well as current gaps and limitations of the field. This book will be of particular interest for policy makers, educators and practitioners, as well as researchers.
Over recent years, many companies have developed an awareness of the importance of an active, rather than passive, approach to wellbeing at work. Whilst the value of this approach is widely accepted, turning theory into effective practice is still a challenge for many companies. The Routledge Companion to Wellbeing at Work is a comprehensive reference volume addressing every aspect of the topic. Split into five parts, it explores different models of wellbeing; personal qualities contributing to wellbeing; job insecurity and organizational wellbeing; workplace supports for wellbeing; and initiatives to enhance wellbeing. The international team of contributors provide a solid foundation to research and practice, including contemporary topics such as architecture, coaching, and fitness in the workplace. Edited by two of the world’s leading scholars on the subject, this text is a valuable tool for researchers, students, and practitioners in HRM and organizational psychology.

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