As rates of depression, anxiety, self-harm and eating disorders are on the up among young people, how can schools provide appropriate information and support for the young people in their classrooms? How can they bridge the gap between what they know matters - the impact of these issues on learning and life-long health - and the mounting day-to-day priorities and pressures of school life? This book provides unique insight into 12 projects that are helping to answer these questions and supporting teachers to make mental health and emotional wellbeing a key player in the school day. With a mix of longer-term initiatives and simple strategies that schools can put in place immediately, it explores mentoring and mindfulness, social action and sport, Lego play and poetry, the power of parents and the role of PSHE. It describes how these projects work practically and shares the impact they are having, increasing resilience and raising the aspirations and emotional wellbeing of the whole school community. As well as showcasing ideas that are making a difference, the book meets with the education leaders and charities behind the initiatives (including Place2Be, Step up to Serve, Kidscape, Mosaic, Diversity Role Models, Beat, Achievement for All and others) who offer advice and signpost useful information to support readers in getting these ideas off the ground in their schools. This book is a source of inspiration for headteachers, senior leadership teams, pastoral care teams, school counsellors and psychologists.
Wellbeing, Education and Contemporary Schooling examines the role of wellbeing in schools and argues that it should be integral to core policy objectives in health and education. The whole school focus chosen is conducive to the review of wellbeing in schools, and assists in better understanding the complex relationships between learners and teachers in policy contexts, where every teacher has a responsibility for learners’ wellbeing. By exploring a range of debates about the nature of wellbeing, the book shows how a child’s wellbeing is inseparable from their overall capacity to learn and achieve, and to become confident, self-assured and active citizens. Drawing on international curriculum developments, it considers the ways in which wellbeing could reshape educational aims in areas such as outdoor learning and aesthetic imagination, helping to inform programmes of professional learning for teachers. Separated into six parts, the book covers: philosophical perspectives on wellbeing policy perspectives on wellbeing professional perspectives on wellbeing practice perspectives on wellbeing future prospects for wellbeing a personal perspective on wellbeing. Examining ways in which wellbeing can become a central component of the ethos, culture and environment of contemporary schools, Wellbeing, Education and Contemporary Schooling is an invaluable guide for all students, teachers, researchers and policy makers with an interest in learning, teaching and children’s wellbeing.
Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools brings together international experts from various disciplines to identify and address a range of current challenges in this rapidly-developing field of endeavour. The opening chapter details lessons learned from research and practice, outlining some emerging challenges for the effective implementation of mental health initiatives in schools. Subsequent chapters take up the various issues, exploring problems and proposing solutions. Topics fall within four broad areas: Organisational and leadership issues such as dealing with 'wicked' or ‘hard-to-tame’ (complex and resistant) problems and taking a broad public health approach; Teacher-related issues, such as how to integrate programs successfully into schools, and teacher skills and professional learning; The challenges and opportunities of new technologies, including cyberbullying and the use of online, multimedia and mobile resources for both student and teacher learning and support; The need for a greater focus on targeted interventions for at-risk students, such as those with disabilities; also addressing ‘hard-to-tame’ problems such as bullying, youth suicide and depression. Mental Health and Wellbeing through Schools will be of interest to those involved in researching, developing, evaluating and implementing mental health initiatives in schools, including academics, practitioners, educators and educational and Mental Health policy makers. It will also be of use to professionals, such as nurses and social workers, concerned with the wellbeing of children and adolescents. The book will have international appeal, with contributors from around the world, experienced in a range of contexts. Rosalyn H. Shute is Adjunct Professor of Psychology at both Flinders and Federation Universities (Australia). Her research expertise lies broadly in clinical child psychology and paediatric psychology/child health and wellbeing. She is an experienced teacher of Developmental Psychology, educational and clinical child/paediatric psychology. Phillip T. Slee is a Professor in Human Development in the School of Education at Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. He is a trained teacher and registered psychologist. His main areas of interest include childhood bullying/aggression, mental health and wellbeing, stress and teacher education. He has a particular interest in the practical and policy implications of his research. He and Shute recently co-authored Child Development: Theories and Critical Perspectives.
This text supports primary schools to develop strategies to enhance the importance of mental health and emotional well-being, to work on preventative strategies and to support children when they need more intervention.
This book focuses on well-being at school in association with positive peer relationships and bullying. Taking an integrative and community-based approach, the book outlines the significance of student-school relationships for well-being and emphasizes the importance of school and classroom climate for promoting well-being. Embedded in research and theory, the book reflects the belief that all of our dealings with children and young people in whatever role, whether as parent or teacher or in some other capacity, are bounded by theory, either implicit or explicit. The book highlights the role of partnerships and linkages in addressing school-based well-being and anti-bullying programs. It pays special attention to the barriers and facilitators that schools must address in engaging with external agencies to deliver strong evidence-based initiatives. The international concern with school bullying is given particular consideration in relation to its impact on the well-being of all involved. A feature of the text is the focus given to the implementation of programs into the busy and complex world of schools and classrooms recognizing that the effectiveness and impact of any school-based program is strongly related to the quality of its implementation. The text reflects a commitment of the authors to a broad-based systemic view of development, taking into account family, school, community and culture as influential factors. The text incorporates a number of pedagogical features e.g. classroom based activities and discussion starters, reflections on points raised in the text, and case studies. This book is of special interest to teachers, school counselors, educational psychologists and mental health professionals working in school settings.
Based on action research and implementation at one of the world’s great schools, this book provides a much-needed exploration of how to implement positive education at a whole school level. Evidence-Based Approaches in Positive Education summarises the integration of a whole-school mental health and well-being strategy, positive psychology programs and pastoral care models from 3 – 18 years of age. Positive education is the teaching of scientifically validated programs from positive psychology and character education that have an impact on student and staff well-being. It is an approach that focuses on teaching, building and embedding social and emotional learning throughout a student’s experience. St Peter’s College - Adelaide is the only institution in the world to integrate Martin Seligman’s well-being theory throughout all aspects of both its strategic intent and positive education programs. The School’s vision is to be a world-class school where all boys flourish. Its mission is to provide an exceptional education that brings out the very best in every boy. This is done within an intellectually and spiritually rich environment that nurtures international-mindedness, intercultural understanding, respect and a commitment to social justice. This book captures the developments of the St Peter’s College journey. It focuses on the integration of well-being across seven strategic goals: Academics; Well-being; Student Life; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Partnerships; People, Culture and Change; Sustainability and Environment; Community Engagement, Advancement, and Philanthropy. A uniquely Australian school, the impact of a St Peter’s College education is to build great men: who believe safety, service and integrity and fundamental parts of their lives; who are active members of communities that are socially and culturally diverse; who engage in political, ethical, and environmental challenges as good citizens. Since 1847, St Peter’s College alumni have had global and life-changing impact in all fields of human endeavour. The School’s alumni include three Nobel Laureates, 42 Rhodes Scholars, Olympians and Archbishops, artists and scientists, educators and journalists, actors and politicians, philanthropists and physicians, CEOs, diplomats and soldiers, explorers, painters and poets. This book shares evidence-based practices and makes a substantial contribution to the rapidly developing field of positive psychology and its application in schools.
This invaluable book offers a comprehensive guide for educators in understanding and promoting wellbeing and violence prevention initiatives in schools and communities. Ittranslates research and theory into practice with a strong evidence-based application. The book is presented in five thematic sections, namely: culture and wellbeing; young females and wellbeing; bullying; cyberbullying and student violence; interventions to promote wellbeing; and interventions to promote violence prevention. An introductory chapter provides an overview of the field and a commentary chapter draws the five themes together. Written by experienced researchers and educators, each of the 21 chapters provides practical information and research on school, classroom or community applications, trends and issues in the field, and practical ideas for wellbeing and violence prevention measures. Issues of culture, gender and youth voice are specifically addressed.
Something is missing in contemporary health and social care. Health and illness is often measured in policy documents in economic terms, and clinical outcomes are enmeshed in statistical data, with the patient’s experience left to one side. This stimulating book is concerned with how to humanise health and social care and keep the person at the centre of practice. Caring and Well-Being opens by articulating Galvin and Todres’ innovative framework for humanising health care and closes with a synthesis of their argument and a discussion of how this can be applied in healthcare policy and practice. It: presents an innovative lifeworld-led approach to the humanisation of care; explores the concept of well-being and its relationship to suffering and outlines the rationale for a focus on them within this approach; discusses how the framework can be applied and how health and social practitioners can draw on aesthetic and empathic avenues to help develop their capacity for care; provides direction for policy, practice and education. Investigating what it means to be human in a health and social care context and what the things that make us feel more human are, this book presents new perspectives about how professionals can enhance their capacity for humanly sensitive care. It is a valuable work for all those interested in ideas about care and caring in a health and social context, including psychologists, doctors and nurses.
Over recent years, many companies have developed an awareness of the importance of an active, rather than passive, approach to wellbeing at work. Whilst the value of this approach is widely accepted, turning theory into effective practice is still a challenge for many companies. The Routledge Companion to Wellbeing at Work is a comprehensive reference volume addressing every aspect of the topic. Split into five parts, it explores different models of wellbeing; personal qualities contributing to wellbeing; job insecurity and organizational wellbeing; workplace supports for wellbeing; and initiatives to enhance wellbeing. The international team of contributors provide a solid foundation to research and practice, including contemporary topics such as architecture, coaching, and fitness in the workplace. Edited by two of the world’s leading scholars on the subject, this text is a valuable tool for researchers, students, and practitioners in HRM and organizational psychology.
This book explores the power music has to address health inequalities and the social determinants of health and wellbeing. It examines music participation as a determinant of wellbeing and as a transformative tool to impact on wider social, cultural and environmental conditions. Uniquely, in this volume health and wellbeing outcomes are conceptualised on a continuum, with potential effects identified in relation to individual participants, their communities but also society at large. While arts therapy approaches have a clear place in the text, the emphasis is on music making outside of clinical contexts and the broader roles musicians, music facilitators and educators can play in enhancing wellbeing in a range of settings beyond the therapy room. This innovative edited collection will be of great interest to scholars and practitioners of music, social services, medical humanities, education and the broader health field in the social and medical sciences.
What makes people happy? Why should governments care about people’s well-being? How would policy change if well-being was the main objective? The Origins of Happiness seeks to revolutionize how we think about human priorities and to promote public policy changes that are based on what really matters to people. Drawing on a uniquely comprehensive range of evidence from longitudinal data on over one hundred thousand individuals in Britain, the United States, Australia, and Germany, the authors consider the key factors that affect human well-being. The authors explore factors such as income, education, employment, family conflict, health, childcare, and crime—and their findings are not what we might expect. Contrary to received wisdom, income inequality accounts for only two percent or less of the variance in happiness across the population; the critical factors affecting a person’s happiness are their relationships and their mental and physical health. More people are in misery due to mental illness than to poverty, unemployment, or physical illness. Examining how childhood influences happiness in adulthood, the authors show that academic performance is a less important predictor than emotional health and behavior, which is shaped tremendously by schools, individual teachers, and parents. For policymakers, the authors propose new forms of cost-effectiveness analysis that places well-being at center stage. Groundbreaking in its scope and results, The Origins of Happiness offers all of us a new vision for how we might become more healthy, happy, and whole.
An investigation of the happiness-prosperity connection and whether economists can measure well-being.
In The Pursuit of Happiness, renowned economist Carol Graham explores what we know about the determinants of happiness and clearly presents both the promise and the potential pitfalls of injecting the "economics of happiness" into public policymaking. While the book spotlights the innovative contributions of happiness research to the dismal science, it also raises a cautionary note about the issues that still need to be addressed before policymakers can make best use of them.
This brief defines student wellbeing and outlines seven evidence-informed pathways that schools can take to promote student wellbeing and develop their school as an enabling institution. The acronym PROSPER is applied as an organizer for both the psychological elements of wellbeing and for these Positive Education pathways. These pathways focus on encouraging Positivity, building Relationships, facilitating Outcomes and a sense of competence, focusing on Strengths, fostering a sense of Purpose, enhancing Engagement and teaching Resilience. Each pathway draws on both the principles of positive psychology and the educational research that identifies the impact of each pathway for student learning. The benefits of a school-wide focus on student wellbeing for student engagement in learning and their success in school and in life are outlined. Practical guidelines for the development and implementation of educational policy that has student wellbeing as its central focus are also provided.
How children experience, negotiate and connect with or resist their surroundings impacts on their health and wellbeing. In cities, various aspects of the physical and social environment can affect children’s wellbeing. This edited collection brings together different accounts and experiences of children’s health and wellbeing in urban environments from majority and minority world perspectives. Privileging children’s expertise, this timely volume explicitly explores the relationships between health, wellbeing and place. To demonstrate the importance of a place-based understanding of urban children’s health and wellbeing, the authors unpack the meanings of the physical, social and symbolic environments that constrain or enable children’s flourishing in urban environments. Drawing on the expertise of geographers, educationists, anthropologists, psychologists, planners and public health researchers, as well as nurses and social workers, this book, above all, sees children as the experts on their experiences of the issues that affect their wellbeing. Children’s Health and Wellbeing in Urban Environments will be fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in cultural geography, urban geography, environmental geography, children’s health, youth studies or urban planning.
The Routledge Handbook of Well-Being explores diverse conceptualisations of well-being, providing an overview of key issues and drawing attention to current debates and critiques. Taken as a whole, this important work offers new clarification of the widely used notion of well-being, focusing particularly on experiential perspectives. Bringing together leading authors from around the world, Routledge Handbook of Well-Being reflects on: What it is that is experienced by humans that can be called well-being. What we know about how to understand it. How well-being is manifested in human endeavours through a wide range of disciplines, including the arts. This comprehensive reference work will provide an authoritative overview for students, practitioners, researchers and policy makers working in or concerned with well-being, health, illness and the relation between all three across a range of disciplines, from sociology, healthcare and economics to philosophy and the creative arts.
"Advice, exercises, and examples to help readers increase their clarity, connection, competence, calm, and courage, from a clinical therapist, mindfulness teacher, and expert on the neuroscience of relationships. Applicable to relationships, jobs, and everyday life"--Provided by publisher.
This resource supports teaching children and young people about mental health, wellbeing, resilience, and interpersonal skills. It was written with support from the Beeby Fellowship funded by the New Zealand National Commission for UNESCO and NZCER. Teachers will discover ways to enhance student learning in four broad areas: personal identity and wellbeing communication and relationships with others social issues and social justice (especially against discrimination and exclusion) health promotion and action. The lesson plans work for multiple year and curriculum levels, and are particularly useful for Years 711 health education. Teachers will find relevant content for the following health education topics: personal identity and enhancing self-worth stress management friendships, relationships, and communication effects of discrimination and stereotyping on mental health support of self and others during times of difficulty equity issues that support the mental health of others and society help-seeking drug education and alcohol education (for example, the content on assertive communication, decision making, personal values) leadership and effective communication. The activities can be extended for senior secondary students and modified to be accessible for students at lower levels. Notes throughout explain how teachers can adapt, apply, and use the activities and ideas to achieve the intended learning outcomes and develop key competencies. Each section begins with specific achievement objectives, but teachers are free to develop their own. For this reason, achievement objectives for each activity are not specified. Instead, teachers can use the matrix showing links with the New Zealand Curriculum
Schools are unique places. They pay a central role in the formation of young people. The importance of how young people are educated and how they are encouraged to live and learn cannot be underestimated. This book advocates for the fostering of agency not only amongst school personnel but also amongst younger generations for health and sustainability. It provides the reader with a new lens with which to discover health promoting schools and education for sustainable development. It invites the reader to look more deeply into both and to accompany the authors on a journey of discovery of the real potential for each to enhance the practice of schooling.
The Resilience and Wellbeing Toolbox is an inspiring book and a beacon for social emotional change in schools. Within these pages teachers and other professionals will find fantastic resources that they can easily implement in the classroom. By following this programme, teachers will see their students developing skills in persistence, problem solving and emotional regulation as well as independence, empathy, kindness, contribution and good will, whilst planting the essential seeds of resilience and wellbeing. Helpful suggestions offered in each chapter on how to bring wellbeing and resilience into the home can be shared with parents and families. The lively and engaging resources in this book include: Practical, photocopiable guide sheets and worksheets, also available as eResources Adaptable role plays and activities Solid research-based strategies A flexible framework that can be creatively implemented in the classroom This is a must-have handbook for anyone seeking to provide young people in their care with a strong foundation for better social, emotional and learning outcomes. Resources can be downloaded at https://www.routledge.com/The-Resilience-and-Wellbeing-Toolbox-A-guide-for-educators-and-health/Nawana-Parker/p/book/9781138921177

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