Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery,or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-oldquestions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstmantakes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organand the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from thebonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, theaffectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in ourlives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how weare born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship ofothers, and how very badly things can go without love. Among thefindings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm makeit healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although thecraving for romantic love can be described as an addiction,friendship may actually be the most important loving relationshipof your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigiousScientific American and Scientific American Mindmagazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, andthe Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controlsour loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep andbasic need for connection.
Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery, or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-old questions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstman takes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organ and the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from the bonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, the affectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in our lives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how we are born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship of others, and how very badly things can go without love. Among the findings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm make it healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although the craving for romantic love can be described as an addiction, friendship may actually be the most important loving relationship of your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigious Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, and the Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controls our loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep and basic need for connection.
Who do we love? Who loves us? And why? Is love really a mystery,or can neuroscience offer some answers to these age-oldquestions? In her third enthralling book about the brain, Judith Horstmantakes us on a lively tour of our most important sex and love organand the whole smorgasbord of our many kinds of love-from thebonding of parent and child to the passion of erotic love, theaffectionate love of companionship, the role of animals in ourlives, and the love of God. Drawing on the latest neuroscience, she explores why and how weare born to love-how we're hardwired to crave the companionship ofothers, and how very badly things can go without love. Among thefindings: parental love makes our brain bigger, sex and orgasm makeit healthier, social isolation makes it miserable-and although thecraving for romantic love can be described as an addiction,friendship may actually be the most important loving relationshipof your life. Based on recent studies and articles culled from the prestigiousScientific American and Scientific American Mindmagazines, The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, andthe Brain offers a fascinating look at how the brain controlsour loving relationships, most intimate moments, and our deep andbasic need for connection.
Good news about getting older from Scientific Americanand Scientific American Mind The Scientific American Healthy Aging Brain taps into themost current research to present a realistic and encouraging viewof the well-aged brain, a sobering look at what can gowrong––and at what might help you and your brain stayhealthy longer. Neurologists and psychologists have discovered theaging brain is much more elastic and supple than previouslythought, and that happiness actually increases with age. While ourshort-term memory may not be what it was, dementia is notinevitable. Far from disintegrating, the elder brain can continueto develop and adapt in many ways and stay sharp as itages. Offers new insights on how an aging brain can repair itself,and the five best strategies for keeping your brain healthy Shows how older brains can acquire new skills, perspective, andproductivity Dispels negative myths about aging Explores what to expect as our brains grow older With hope and truth, this book helps us preserve whatwe’ve got, minimize what we’ve lost, and optimize thevigor and health of our maturing brains.
Have you ever wondered what’s happening in your brain as you go through a typical day and night? This fascinating book presents an hour-by-hour round-the-clock journal of your brain’s activities. Drawing on the treasure trove of information from Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazines as well as original material written specifically for this book, Judith Horstman weaves together a compelling description of your brain at work and at play. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain reveals what’s going on in there while you sleep and dream, how your brain makes memories and forms addictions and why we sometimes make bad decisions. The book also offers intriguing information about your emotional brain, and what’s happening when you’re feeling love, lust, fear and anxiety—and how sex, drugs and rock and roll tickle the same spots. Based on the latest scientific information, the book explores your brain’s remarkable ability to change, how your brain can make new neurons even into old age and why multitasking may be bad for you. Your brain is uniquely yours – but research is showing many of its day-to-day cycles are universal. This book gives you a look inside your brain and some insights into why you may feel and act as you do. The Scientific American Day in the Life of Your Brain is written in the entertaining, informative and easy-to-understand style that fans of Scientific American and Scientific American Mind magazine have come to expect.
Previously published as Dirty Minds: How Our Brains Influence Love, Sex, and Relationships. PHILOSOPHERS, THEOLOGIANS, ARTISTS, AND BOY BANDS HAVE WAXED poetic for centuries about the nature of love. But what does the brain have to say about the way we carry our hearts? In the wake of a divorce, science writer and single mother Kayt Sukel made herself a guinea pig in the labs of some unusual love experts to find out. This Is Your Brain on Sex is her lively and hilarious examination of the big questions about love and sex, previously published in hardcover as Dirty Minds. Each chapter of this edgy romp through the romantic brain looks at a different aspect of love above the belt. What in your brain makes you love someone—or simply lust after them? Why do good girls like bad boys? Is monogamy practical? How thin is that line between love and hate? After reading this gimlet-eyed look at love, sex, and the brain, you’ll never look at romance the same way again.
How much control do we have over love? Much less than we like to think. All that mystery, all that poetry, all those complex behaviors sur­rounding human bonding leading to the most life-changing decisions we’ll ever make, are unconsciously driven by a few molecules in our brains. How does love begin? How can two strangers come to the conclusion that it would not only be pleasant to share their lives, but that they must share them? How can a man say he loves his wife, yet still cheat on her? Why do others stay in relationships even after the ro­mance fades? How is it possible to fall in love with the “wrong” person? How do people come to have a “type”? Physical attraction, jealousy, infidelity, mother-infant bonding—all the behaviors that so often leave us befuddled—are now being teased out of the fog of mystery thanks to today’s social neuroscience. Larry Young, one of the world’s leading experts in the field, and journalist Brian Alexander explain how those findings apply to you. Drawing on real human stories and research from labs around the world, The Chemistry Between Us is a bold attempt to create a “grand unified theory” of love. Some of the mind-blowing insights include: Love can get such a grip on us because it is, literally, an addiction. To a woman falling in love, a man is like her baby. Why it’s false to say society makes gender, and how it’s possible to have the body of one gender and the brain of another. Why some people are more likely to cheat than others. Why we sometimes truly can’t resist temptation. Young and Alexander place their revelations into historical, political, and social contexts. In the pro­cess, they touch on everything from gay marriage to why single-mother households might not be good for society. The Chemistry Between Us offers powerful in­sights into love, sex, gender, sexual orientation, and family life that will prove to be enlightening, contro­versial, and thought provoking.
You have in your hands the most rigorous, complete and readable book ever written about the fascinating science of human sexuality. This book goes beyond the well-worn sexual education advice and the usual evolutionist psychology. After The Brain Snatcher, Pere Estupinyà comes back with the first popular science book on sex aimed at a wide audience. While there are some tips for the more adventurous, there is also a wealth of new information to be discovered. Distancing himself from the many books on advice or techniques, Estupinyà brings sex to another dimension by combining popular beliefs and science. Do you want proof that our decision-making in the “heat of the moment” is less rational than we think? Did you know that mind and vagina each go their own way? Are you interested in learning about the effects of yoga on sexual pleasure? Did you know about the attempts in the 60s to “cure” homosexuals with electric shock therapy, the chemical analysis of female ejaculation, or the fundamental relationship between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system? The author has spoken directly with asexual and intersexual individuals, fetishists, multi-orgasmic women, women who never have orgasms through penetration, and men who have no refractory period. He has also participated in sadomasochistic events; learned tantric techniques with a couple of coaches, spoken with porn performers at Barcelona’s Bagdad, and attended workshops in which a woman teaches how to have orgasms with your mind and breathing. The result is an incredible miscellany of information that appeals to both the scientific community and the curious.
A groundbreaking exploration of our most complex and mysterious emotion Elation, mood swings, sleeplessness, and obsession—these are the tell-tale signs of someone in the throes of romantic passion. In this revealing new book, renowned anthropologist Helen Fisher explains why this experience—which cuts across time, geography, and gender—is a force as powerful as the need for food or sleep. Why We Love begins by presenting the results of a scientific study in which Fisher scanned the brains of people who had just fallen madly in love. She proves, at last, what researchers had only suspected: when you fall in love, primordial areas of the brain "light up" with increased blood flow, creating romantic passion. Fisher uses this new research to show exactly what you experience when you fall in love, why you choose one person rather than another, and how romantic love affects your sex drive and your feelings of attachment to a partner. She argues that all animals feel romantic attraction, that love at first sight comes out of nature, and that human romance evolved for crucial reasons of survival. Lastly, she offers concrete suggestions on how to control this ancient passion, and she optimistically explores the future of romantic love in our chaotic modern world. Provocative, enlightening, and persuasive, Why We Love offers radical new answers to the age-old question of what love is and thus provides invaluable new insights into keeping love alive.
...excellent: accurate, entertaining and thought-provoking... - American ScientistVirtually anyone interested in gender studies, human sexuality, the application of evolutionary theory to behavior, or psychology in general should consider this fascinating book must reading. - BooklistIn this work on how evolution affects how we behave in the romantic and sexual realms, the author . . . kicks away Cupid in favor of Darwin and the result is fascinating . . . . Barber is seemingly inexhaustible when it comes to diversity of thought . . . . His accessible and lively writing keeps the book from feeling too wide-ranging and scholarly. . . . those who don't mind considering that romantic inclinations may be in one's genes and not in one's heart will find much to chew on in this weighty addition to the field of evolutionary psychology. -ForeWord MagazineNigel Barber is one of the most innovative and intriguing investigators currently writing in the field of evolutionary psychology. His insights are always novel and provocative, challenging our preconceptions and encouraging us to consider alternative perspectives on gender differences and romantic and sexual behavior. His observations are certain to generate discussion from scientists, and from anyone who has ever been mystified by love. - Michael Cunningham, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Louisville, and President, International Network on Personal RelationshipsRecent advances in evolutionary psychology and biology have revolutionized the understanding of human courtship, marriage, and relationships. The Science of Romance provides an accessible and entertaining look at this new research and explores many of the implications for sexual and romantic relationships. The book is a pleasure to read and is highly recommended to the reader who wishes to better understand human relationships or wants an introduction to evolutionary psychology. - David C. Geary, Ph.D., Middlebush Professor of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri at Columbia, and author of Male, Female: The Evolution of Human Sex DifferencesA gripping book throughout--scientifically sound and wonderfully illustrated with real life examples; must reading for everyone concerned with human mating, which is just about everyone. - David M. Buss, author of The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human MatingHave you ever wondered why divorce is so much more common now than a century ago? Why the sex appeal of certain body types and clothing styles changes so dramatically over time? Why so many liberated young women today prefer emotional commitment from men while their male counterparts seem always more interested in sowing their wild oats?According to evolutionary psychologist Nigel Barber, each of these aspects of modern life reflects two million years of hominid evolution. In The Science of Romance he explains that much of our present behavior can be traced back to the ancient evolved motives of our hunter-gatherer ancestors. In short, we exhibit the behaviors that have evolved over millennia to increase the reproductive success of the species. Also drawing on the mating behavior of various animals, Barber finds illuminating comparisons that help to explain human actions and reactions.Barber delves into a host of interesting topics: dating competition and aggression; female courtship signals that subtly manipulate male behavior; how exposure to different sex hormones shapes the evolving brain in utero, which may account for the different behaviors of men and women; and much more.This absorbing book educates and entertains, while showing that many seemingly irrational aspects of our intimate romantic behavior make sense when understood in terms of our prehistoric ancestors and evolution.Nigel Barber, Ph.D. (Portland, ME), formerly an assistant professor of psychology at Birmingham-Southern College, is now a freelance writer and researcher, and the author of Why Parents Matter: Parental Investment and Child Outcomes.
You hold the key to stronger relationships, deeper connections, and heightened intimacy. Everyone wants to know how to improve his or her love life, but so few of us understand the integral role the brain plays in attraction, keeping us excited about our partner, and helping us feel a strong connection. Based on Dr. Daniel Amen’s cutting-edge neuroscience research, The Brain in Love shares twelve lessons that help you enhance your love life through understanding and improving brain function. Filled with practical suggestions and information on how to have lasting and more fulfilling relationships, The Brain in Love reveals: • How emotional and physical intimacy can help prevent heart disease, improve memory, stave off cancer, and boost your immune system • How the differences between men’s and women’s brains affect our perceptions and interest in sex • The science behind why breakups hurt so much, and what you can do to ease the pain • Surefire techniques to fix common problems–depression, PMS, ADD–that contribute to conflicts • How to make yourself unforgettable to your partner The Brain in Love explains everything there is to know about the brain in love and lust, guiding you to the emotional and physical intimacy you need. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Disarming Cupid: Love, Sex and Science by the Editors of Scientific American Sometimes All You Need Is Love; sometimes Love Is a Battlefield. Whether Love Hurts, Bites, Will Keep Us Together, Will Tear Us Apart or Is a Four-Letter Word, it seems we Want To Know What Love Is. Love – in both the abstract and the up-close-and-personal – has always provided limitless inspiration for artists, writers and musicians, but scientists are just as fascinated by these affairs of the heart, though they seldom sing about it. In this eBook, Disarming Cupid: Love, Sex and Science, our editors take a step back, analyzing romance using tools like fMRI studies instead of a paint brush or guitar. The writers examine a variety of topics, starting with the perceived sex differences between men and women discussed in Section 1 – are we really as different as Mars and Venus? As our opening story shows, few other questions can get at the heart of this debate like "Can heterosexual men and women ever be ‘just friends'?" (Spoiler alert: new research suggests that the answer is no.) Subsequent sections tackle other facets of love, including the implications of the drastic rise in online dating, how we choose our romantic partners and what happens in our brains when we're in love. In particular "All You Need Is Love" finds – or, perhaps for some, verifies – that romantic love stimulates the same pathways as an addictive drug. Section 5 focuses on issues of gender and sexuality. "Do Gays Have a Choice?" analyzes a wealth of scientific evidence and shows that sexual orientation is determined more by both genes and environment, rather than being a choice. We also don't shy away from darker aspects of love, such as the psychology of prostitution and sex appeal of narcissists, because to ignore these aspects of love is to trivialize it. Besides, love's paradoxes are one of the reasons why it is The Topic for cultural discourse. As Pascal said, "The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing." Hopefully this eBook will change the "nothing" to "at least something."
What is neuroplasticity? Is it possible to change your brain? Norman Doidge’s inspiring guide to the new brain science explains all of this and more An astonishing new science called neuroplasticity is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable, and proving that it is, in fact, possible to change your brain. Psychoanalyst, Norman Doidge, M.D., traveled the country to meet both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity, its healing powers, and the people whose lives they’ve transformed—people whose mental limitations, brain damage or brain trauma were seen as unalterable. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, blind people who learn to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, stroke patients learning to speak, children with cerebral palsy learning to move with more grace, depression and anxiety disorders successfully treated, and lifelong character traits changed. Using these marvelous stories to probe mysteries of the body, emotion, love, sex, culture, and education, Dr. Doidge has written an immensely moving, inspiring book that will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential. From the Trade Paperback edition.
An examination of the Hebrew Scriptures reveals the ethical situations in ancient Israel as a structural analysis, and exposes a covenantal triangle that features a dynamic of giving and receiving, taking and paying penalties, as a meme for human relationships. This can be applied to groups as well as individuals and is surprisingly applicable to life in the twenty-first century. Two senses of Law--natural scientific discoveries and the rules laid down by a divine creator--lead to frames for considering these covenantal relationships, and even the existence of Sin. Are we bound to obey the rules laid down by God, or may we decide what is best for us?
The knowledge that there are biological differences in the male and female brain has been taken for granted in the scientific community for years, yet it's kept so quiet as to seem like science's dirty little secret. This book boldly and responsibly ventures forth with these findings and their implications.
Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.
The Trickster Brain: Neuroscience, Evolution, and Nature by David Williams looks at literature from an evolutionary, biological, and neurological perspective. He uses the Trickster character as he/she appears across cultures to demonstrate how stories reveal universal aspects of the biological mind. Williams brings together science and the humanities, demonstrating a critical way of approaching literature that incorporates scientific thought.
No culture is ever completely successful or satisfied with its synthesis of romantic love, companionship, and sexual desire. Whether the setting is a busy metropolis or a quiet farming village, a tension always exists between a community's sexual habits and customs and what it believes to be the proper context for love. Even in Western societies, we prefer sexual passion to romance and companionship, and no study of any culture has shown that individuals regard passion and affection equally. The pursuit of love and sex has generated an infinite number of ambiguities and contradictions, yet every community hopes to find a resolution to this conflict either by joining, dividing, or stressing one act over the other. In this follow-up to Romantic Passion: A Universal Experience?, William R. Jankowiak examines how different cultures rationalize the expression of passionate and comfort love and physical sex. He begins by mapping out the intricacies of the love/sex conundrum and the psychological dilemma of reconciling these competing forces. He then follows with essays on sex, love, and intimacy among Central African foragers and farmers; the love dyad in Lithuania; intimacy among the Lahu of Southwestern China; the interplay of love, sex, and marriage in the High Himalayas; verbalized experiences of love and sexuality in Indonesia; love work as it relates to sex work among prostitutes; intimacies and estrangements in the marital and extramarital relationships of Huli men; infidelity and masculinity in Southwestern Nigeria; and the ritual of sex and the rejuvenation of the love bond among married couples in the United States.
Lässt sich die Welt rein mechanistisch erklären? Kommt unser Bewusstsein wirklich aus dem Gehirn? Der berühmte Biologe Rupert Sheldrake beweist in seinem provozierenden neuen Werk, dass das materialistische Weltbild nicht mehr haltbar ist. Er zeigt anhand von zehn Dogmen, dass die meisten Forscher an Vorstellungen festhalten, die längst überholt sind. Sheldrake fordert ein neues, grenzüberschreitendes Denken und plädiert für mehr Offenheit und Neugier in den Naturwissenschaften. "Sheldrake ist ein herausragender Wissenschaftler. Er gehört zu jenen echten, visionären Entdeckern, die in früheren Zeiten neue Kontinente fanden." New Scientist

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