For many years, brief encounters between sharks and humans could leave the latter with a vivid memory of the much-maligned fish but no convenient means of identifying it more specifically. With the publication of The Sharks of North American Waters in 1983, everyone from the experienced ichthyologist to the weekend angler had access to concise descriptions and accurate, detailed drawings in this handy field guide to more than one hundred species. All species that have been reported within five hundred nautical miles of U.S. and Canadian shores (plus a few deep-water species from adjacent areas) are illustrated, with summaries of diagnostic characteristics, similar species, geographic range, biology, reproduction, utility, and fishing methods. An illustrated key to the families of sharks, family descriptions, and species characteristics makes field identification simple. Also included is a general account of the evolution of sharks, their anatomy, reproduction, and distribution.
A complete reference to all the sharks inhabiting North American waters, with excellent color illustrations of all the species.
For many years, brief encounters between sharks and humans could leave the latter with a vivid memory of the much-maligned fish but no convenient means of identifying it more specifically. With the publication of The Sharks of North American Waters in 1983, everyone from the experienced ichthyologist to the weekend angler had access to concise descriptions and accurate, detailed drawings in this handy field guide to more than one hundred species.
This volume had its origin in a symposium on the Reproduction and Development of Cartilaginous Fishes that was held at the annual meetings of the American Elasmobranch Society and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in Charleston, South Carolina in 1990. The cartilaginous fishes, class Chondrichthyes, are a large and diverse group of fishes that include approximately 900 to 1100 living species of sharks, skates, rays and ratfishes. Throughout their history, which dates back at least 400 million years, they have been a successful major component of the marine ecosystem. The chondrichthyan fishes occupy a pivotal position in comparative and evolutionary studies of vertebrate reproduction and development. They are the oldest surviving group of jawed vertebrates and they possess both the adult vertebrate Bauplan and the vertebrate program of embryonic development. The major features of the female reproductive system, including its embryonic origin, structure, physiological function, and biochemistry, apparently were established early in vertebrate evolution and are fully developed in chondrichthyan fishes. These features of the female reproductive system have been retained during the evolution of the other classes of vertebrates. Much the same can be said for the male reproductive system. Moreover, viviparity, placental nourishment of developing embryos, and the hormonal regulation of these events made an initial appearance in this group. The 22 articles presented in this volume bring together a wide variety of complementary research by investigators from seven countries, allowing us to broaden the scope and implications of our studies while identifying opportunities for future research. The appearance of a volume on the reproduction and development of cartilaginous fishes is quite opportune. The continued existence of these fishes, which survived the great extinction events of Earth's history, is now threatened by overexploitation unless immediate steps for their conservation are undertaken. Knowledge of their reproduction and development not only is an end in itself, but is of critical importance in devising successful conservation and resource management strategies.
Identifies and describes the most common fishes of North America and offers advice on how to observe fish in the wilds
Migration, broadly defined as directional movement to take advantage of spatially distributed resources, is a dramatic behaviour and an important component of many life histories that can contribute to the fundamental structuring of ecosystems. In recent years, our understanding of migration has advanced radically with respect to both new data and conceptual understanding. It is now almost twenty years since publication of the first edition, and an authoritative and up-to-date sequel that provides a taxonomically comprehensive overview of the latest research is therefore timely. The emphasis throughout this advanced textbook is on the definition and description of migratory behaviour, its ecological outcomes for individuals, populations, and communities, and how these outcomes lead to natural selection acting on the behaviour to cause its evolution. It takes a truly integrative approach, showing how comparisons across a diversity of organisms and biological disciplines can illuminate migratory life cycles, their evolution, and the relation of migration to other movements. Migration: The Biology of Life on the Move focuses on migration as a behavioural phenomenon with important ecological consequences for organisms as diverse as aphids, butterflies, birds and whales. It is suitable for senior undergraduate and graduate level students taking courses in behaviour, spatial ecology, 'movement ecology', and conservation. It will also be of interest and use to a broader audience of professional ecologists and behaviourists seeking an authoritative overview of this rapidly expanding field.
Quickly and decisively manage any medical emergency you encounter in the great outdoors with Wilderness Medicine! World-renowned authority and author, Dr. Paul Auerbach, and a team of experts offer proven, practical, visual guidance for effectively diagnosing and treating the full range of emergencies and health problems encountered in situations where time and resources are scarce. Every day, more and more people are venturing into the wilderness and extreme environments, or are victims of horrific natural disasters...and many are unprepared for the dangers and aftermath that come with these episodes. Whether these victims are stranded on mountaintops, lost in the desert, injured on a remote bike path, or ill far out at sea, this indispensable resource--now with online access at www.expertconsult.com for greater accessibility and portability-- equips rescuers and health care professionals to effectively address and prevent injury and illness in the wilderness! This textbook is widely referred to as "The Bible of Wilderness Medicine." Be able to practice emergency medicine outside of the traditional hospital/clinical setting whether you are in remote environments, underdeveloped but highly populated areas, or disaster areas, are part of search and rescue operations, or dealing with casualties from episodes of extreme sports and active lifestyle activities. Face any medical challenge in the wilderness with expert guidance: Dr. Auerbach is a noted author and the world's leading authority on wilderness medicine. He is a founder and Past President of the Wilderness Medical Society, consultant to the Divers Alert Network and many other agencies and organizations, and a member of the National Medical Committee for the National Ski Patrol System. Handle everything from frostbite to infection by marine microbes, not to mention other diverse injuries, bites, stings, poisonous plant exposures, animal attacks, and natural disasters. Grasp the essential aspects of search and rescue. Respond quickly and effectively by improvising with available materials. Improve your competency and readiness with the latest guidance on volcanic eruptions, extreme sports, splints and slings, wilderness cardiology, living off the land, aerospace medicine, mental health in the wilderness, tactical combat casualty care, and much more. Meet the needs and special considerations of specific patient populations such as children, women, elders, persons with chronic medical conditions, and the disabled. Make smart decisions about gear, navigation, nutrition, and survival. Be prepared for everything with expanded coverage on topics such as high altitude, cold water immersion, and poisonous and venomous plants and animals. Get the skills you need now with new information on global humanitarian relief and expedition medicine, plus expanded coverage of injury prevention and environmental preservation. Get guidance on the go with fully searchable online text, plus bonus images, tables and video clips - all available on ExpertConsult.com.
Forty-eight stickers: Mako, Hammerhead, Thresher sharks; Roughtooth, Bottlenose dolphins; Humpback, Killer, and Pilot whales, more.
A journalist's obsession brings her to a remote island off the California coast, home to the world's most mysterious and fearsome predators--and the strange band of surfer-scientists who follow them Susan Casey was in her living room when she first saw the great white sharks of the Farallon Islands, their dark fins swirling around a small motorboat in a documentary. These sharks were the alphas among alphas, some longer than twenty feet, and there were too many to count; even more incredible, this congregation was taking place just twenty-seven miles off the coast of San Francisco. In a matter of months, Casey was being hoisted out of the early-winter swells on a crane, up a cliff face to the barren surface of Southeast Farallon Island-dubbed by sailors in the 1850s the "devil's teeth." There she joined Scot Anderson and Peter Pyle, the two biologists who bunk down during shark season each fall in the island's one habitable building, a haunted, 135-year-old house spackled with lichen and gull guano. Two days later, she got her first glimpse of the famous, terrifying jaws up close and she was instantly hooked; her fascination soon yielded to obsession-and an invitation to return for a full season. But as Casey readied herself for the eight-week stint, she had no way of preparing for what she would find among the dangerous, forgotten islands that have banished every campaign for civilization in the past two hundred years. The Devil's Teeth is a vivid dispatch from an otherworldly outpost, a story of crossing the boundary between society and an untamed place where humans are neither wanted nor needed.
This is the single most historically valuable book ever written on the subject of Pacific Coast shark attacks. Through bone-chilling accounts in victims' own words, never before published photographs, and detailed maps and charts of attack locations, this book accurately chronicles every known unprovoked shark attack that occurred along the Pacific Coast of North America during the entire Twentieth Century. The author's examination of wound characteristics, recurring locations, and the curious phenomenon of attacks on inanimate objects afford astonishing insights into why sharks attack. These insights form the foundation for his safety recommendations to specific ocean user groups. Based on 40 years' of research, this book willl be of inestimable value to scientists, researchers and educators, as well as anyone that might venture into the waters off the Pacific Coast. The understanding gained from this book will temper fears with knowledge and provide the reader with clear and specific information that may easily make the difference between life and death.
Combining rich historical detail and a harrowing, pulse-pounding narrative, Close to Shore brilliantly re-creates the summer of 1916, when a rogue Great White shark attacked swimmers along the New Jersey shore, triggering mass hysteria and launching the most extensive shark hunt in history. In July 1916 a lone Great White left its usual deep-ocean habitat and headed in the direction of the New Jersey shoreline. There, near the towns of Beach Haven and Spring Lake--and, incredibly, a farming community eleven miles inland--the most ferocious and unpredictable of predators began a deadly rampage: the first shark attacks on swimmers in U.S. history. For Americans celebrating an astoundingly prosperous epoch, fueled by the wizardry of revolutionary inventions, the arrival of this violent predator symbolized the limits of mankind's power against nature. Interweaving a vivid portrait of the era and meticulously drawn characters with chilling accounts of the shark's five attacks and the frenzied hunt that ensued, Michael Capuzzo has created a nonfiction historical thriller with the texture of Ragtime and the tension of Jaws. From the unnerving inevitability of the first attack on the esteemed son of a prosperous Philadelphia physician to the spine-tingling moment when a farm boy swimming in Matawan Creek feels the sandpaper-like skin of the passing shark, Close to Shore is an undeniably gripping saga. Heightening the drama are stories of the resulting panic in the citizenry, press and politicians, and of colorful personalities such as Herman Oelrichs, a flamboyant millionaire who made a bet that a shark was no match for a man (and set out to prove it); Museum of Natural History ichthyologist John Treadwell Nichols, faced with the challenge of stopping a mythic sea creature about which little was known; and, most memorable, the rogue Great White itself moving through a world that couldn't conceive of either its destructive power or its moral right to destroy. Scrupulously researched and superbly written, Close to Shore brings to life a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history. Masterfully written and suffused with fascinating period detail and insights into the science and behavior of sharks, Close to Shore recounts a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history with startling immediacy. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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