Featuring more than 4,100 detailed paintings and five hundred maps, highlights the similarities and distinctions between approximately six hundred North American tree species.
Provides basic information about the biology, life cycles, and behavior of birds, along with brief profiles of each of the eighty bird families in North America.
Featuring the most well-known 50 tree species in eastern North America, these high-quality, illustrated posters showcase beautifully rendered paintings designed to highlight the intricate details of each tree. For ease of comparison and identification, reproductions of similar tree types?from magnolia and birch to oak and ash to maple and elm?are grouped together. Using the foothills of the Rocky Mountains as the dividing line for east and west, this informative poster can be used for easy identification of trees found across North America. Printed and packaged using recycled papers, this stunning poster will enhance any tree-lovers' wall.
“I wrote and illustrated this book to help every inquisitive birder, from novice to expert. Whether you can identify six birds or six hundred, you’ll be a better birder if you have a grounding in the real nuts and bolts of what birds look like, and your skills will be even sharper if you know exactly what to look for and how to record what you see.” —David Allen Sibley The Sibley Guide to Birds and The Sibley Guide to Bird Life and Behavior are both universally acclaimed as the new standard source of species information. And now David Sibley, America’s premier birder and best-known bird artist, takes a new direction; in Sibley’s Birding Basics he is concerned not so much with species as with the general characteristics that influence the appearance of all birds and thus give us the clues to their identity. To create this guide, David Sibley thought through all the skills that enable him to identify a bird in the few instants it is visible to him. Now he shares that information, integrating an explanation of the identification process with many painted and drawn images of details (such as a feather) or concepts. Birding Basics begins by reviewing how one can get started as a birder: the equipment necessary, where and when to go birding, and perhaps most important, the essential things to look for when birds appear in the field. Using many illustrations, David Sibley reviews all the basic concepts of bird identification and then describes the variations (of shape, size, and color) that can change the appearance of a bird over time or in different settings. And he issues a warning about “illusions and other pitfalls”—and advice on avoiding them. The second part of the book, also plentifully illustrated, deals with another set of clues, the major aspects of avian life that differ from species to species: feathers (color, arrangement, shape, molt), behavior and habitat, and sounds. This scientifically precise, beautifully illustrated volume distills the essence of David Sibley’s own experience and skills, providing a solid introduction to “naming” the birds. With Sibley as your guide, when you learn how to interpret what the feathers, the anatomical structure, the sounds of a bird tell you—when you know the clues that show you why there’s no such thing as “just a duck”—birding will be more fun, and more meaningful. An essential addition to the Sibley shelf! From the Trade Paperback edition.
A guide for bird enthusiasts specifically designed for use in the field features descriptions of 650 species of birds from east of the Rocky Mountains, and illustrations that depict species from different views.
Features more than one thousand annotated illustrations of North American trees and their foliage, seeds, and buds, and provides information on habitat, climate, and species traits and history.
A new method for the practical identification and recognition of trees -- and an important supplement to existing botanical methods. The book is in two parts: Pictorial Keys and Master Pages. The Keys are designed for easy visual comparison of details which look alike, narrowing the identification of a tree to one of a small group -- the family or genus. Then, in the Master Pages, the species of the tree is determined, with similar details placed together to highlight differences within the family group, thus eliminating all other possibilities. The details of the Oak trees on this plate are an example of the system. All of the more than 1500 photographs were made specifically for use in this book and were taken either in the field or of carefully collected specimens. Where possible, details such as leaves, fruit, etc., appear in actual size, or in the same scale.
What kind of tree is that? From Maine to New York, you'll never be stumped again with this handy companion to the trees of the Northeast, either out in the woods or in your own backyard.
Describes over 700 species of both native and introduced trees, listnig the entries by families and including a reference section in which the various families are discussed in terms of similarities and differences.
Presents a reference guide to over seven hundred species of trees, providing introductory essays along with individual entries on habitat, range, and descriptions of leaves, fruits, and flowers.
We bring the strength and beauty of the natural world into our urban landscapes by planting trees, and California is blessed with a rich horticultural history, visible in an abundance of cultivated trees that enrich our lives with extraordinary color, bizarre shapes, unusual textures, and unexpected aromas. A Californian's Guide to the Trees among Us features over 150 of California's most commonly grown trees. Whether native or cultivated, these are the trees that muffle noise, create wildlife habitats, mitigate pollution, conserve energy, and make urban living healthier and more peaceful. Used as a field guide or read with pleasure for the liveliness of the prose, this book will allow readers to learn the stories behind the trees that shade our parks, grace our yards, and line our streets. Rich in photographs and illustrations, overflowing with anecdote and information, A Californian's Guide to the Trees among Us opens our eyes to a world of beauty just outside our front doors.
Presents a new identification guide to North American birds with paintings of hundreds of species and information on bird calls, stages of growth, shapes, markings, ranges, migration routes, breeding locations, and habitats.
All the wild trees, shrubs, and woody vines in the area north to Newfoundland, south to North Carolina and Tennessee, and west to the Dakotas and Kansas are described in detail. Accounts of 646 species include shape and arrangement of leaves, height, color, bark texture, flowering season, and fruit. Clear, accurate drawings illustrate leaves, flowers, buds, tree silhouettes, and other characteristics.
Of all our childhood memories, few are quite as thrilling, or as tactile, as those of climbing trees. Scampering up the rough trunk, spying on the world from the cool green shelter of the canopy, lying on a limb and looking up through the leaves at the summer sun almost made it seem as if we were made for trees, and trees for us.Even in adulthood, trees retain their power, from the refreshing way their waves of green break the monotony of a cityscape to the way their autumn transformations take our breath away. In this lavishly illustrated volume, the trees that have enriched our lives finally get their full due, through a focus on the humble leaves that serve, in a sense, as their public face. The Book of Leaves offers a visually stunning and scientifically engaging guide to six hundred of the most impressive and beautiful leaves from around the world. Each leaf is reproduced here at its actual size, in full color, and is accompanied by an explanation of the range, distribution, abundance, and habitat of the tree on which it’s found. Brief scientific and historical accounts of each tree and related species include fun-filled facts and anecdotes that broaden its portrait. The Henry’s Maple, for instance, found in China and named for an Irish doctor who collected leaves there, bears little initial resemblance to the statuesque maples of North America, from its diminutive stature to its unusual trifoliolate leaves. Or the Mediterranean Olive, which has been known to live for more than 1,500 years and whose short, narrow leaves only fall after two or three years, pushed out in stages by the emergence of younger leaves. From the familiar friends of our backyards to the giants of deep woods, The Book of Leaves brings the forest to life—and to our living rooms—as never before.
Complemented by more than seven hundred full-color photographs, drawings, and maps, this intriguing field guide takes a close-up look at the trees of New York City and the metropolitan area, discussing the natural history of each tree, furnishing identification tips, and including a driectory of the oldest, strangest, and most beautiful trees. Original. (Biology & Natural History)
Over one thousand full-color photographs feature leaves, flowers, fruit, and other identifying characteristics
A guide for bird enthusiasts specifically designed for use in the field features descriptions of 703 species of birds from west of the Rocky Mountains, and illustrations that depict species from different views.
Presents a guidebook which provides identification tips, information on behavior and nesting, locator and range maps, and plumage and species classification data on over 990 species of birds found in North America.
Fran�ois Andr� Michaux (1770-1855) was a French botanist whose work on the trees of North America gave the world’s first illustrated account of American trees east of the Mississippi. From 1841 to 1849 the English botanist and one of the greatest plant explorers of North America, Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859), prepared supplementary volumes to Michaux’s landmark work, The North American Sylva. More than 150 years after the final publication, this volume includes full-color reproductions of all of the more than 270 plates in a single volume for the first time. Mirroring Abbeville’s best-selling National Audubon Society Birds of America, the book includes capsule summaries of every species featured, written by New York Botanical Garden curators, along with reference paintings of the trees and range maps by one of the world’s best-known natural history illustrators, David Allen Sibley. Garden President Gregory Long provides a special foreword in honor of the Garden’s 125th Anniversary in 2016. Sibley prefaces the book with an essay on the connection of art and natural history. Award-winning horticultural writer Marta McDowell relates the stories of explorer-scientists Michaux and Nuttall.

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