Thousands of years of poor farming and ranching practices—and, especially, modern industrial agriculture—have led to the loss of up to 80 percent of carbon from the world’s soils. That carbon is now floating in the atmosphere, and even if we stopped using fossil fuels today, it would continue warming the planet. In The Soil Will Save Us, journalist and bestselling author Kristin Ohlson makes an elegantly argued, passionate case for "our great green hope"—a way in which we can not only heal the land but also turn atmospheric carbon into beneficial soil carbon—and potentially reverse global warming. As the granddaughter of farmers and the daughter of avid gardeners, Ohlson has long had an appreciation for the soil. A chance conversation with a local chef led her to the crossroads of science, farming, food, and environmentalism and the discovery of the only significant way to remove carbon dioxide from the air—an ecological approach that tends not only to plants and animals but also to the vast population of underground microorganisms that fix carbon in the soil. Ohlson introduces the visionaries—scientists, farmers, ranchers, and landscapers—who are figuring out in the lab and on the ground how to build healthy soil, which solves myriad problems: drought, erosion, air and water pollution, and food quality, as well as climate change. Her discoveries and vivid storytelling will revolutionize the way we think about our food, our landscapes, our plants, and our relationship to Earth.
2002 ging D. Rodriguez nach Kabul, wo sie - ganz anders als geplant - einen Salon und eine Schule für Friseurinnen und Kosmetikerinnen eröffnete. Für die afghanischen Frauen bedeutet diese Ausbildung die Möglichekit, selbst Geld zu verdienen und sich einen kleinen Freiraum zu schaffen.
"Nothing is more important to life than water, and no one knows water better than Sandra Postel. Replenish is a wise, sobering, but ultimately hopeful book." —Elizabeth Kolbert "Clear-eyed treatise...Postel makes her case eloquently." —Booklist, starred review "An informative, purposeful argument." —Kirkus We have disrupted the natural water cycle for centuries in an effort to control water for our own prosperity. Yet every year, recovery from droughts and floods costs billions of dollars, and we spend billions more on dams, diversions, levees, and other feats of engineering. These massive projects not only are risky financially and environmentally, they often threaten social and political stability. What if the answer was not further control of the water cycle, but repair and replenishment? Sandra Postel takes readers around the world to explore water projects that work with, rather than against, nature’s rhythms. In New Mexico, forest rehabilitation is safeguarding drinking water; along the Mississippi River, farmers are planting cover crops to reduce polluted runoff; and in China, “sponge cities” are capturing rainwater to curb urban flooding. Efforts like these will be essential as climate change disrupts both weather patterns and the models on which we base our infrastructure. We will be forced to adapt. The question is whether we will continue to fight the water cycle or recognize our place in it and take advantage of the inherent services nature offers. Water, Postel writes, is a gift, the source of life itself. How will we use this greatest of gifts?
Our most compelling resource just might be the ground beneath our feet. When a teaspoon of soil contains millions of species, and when we pave over the earth on a daily basis, what does that mean for our future? What is the risk to our food supply, the planet's wildlife, the soil on which every life-form depends? How much undeveloped, untrodden ground do we even have left? Paul Bogard set out to answer these questions in The Ground Beneath Us, and what he discovered is astounding. From New York (where more than 118,000,000 tons of human development rest on top of Manhattan Island) to Mexico City (which sinks inches each year into the Aztec ruins beneath it), Bogard shows us the weight of our cities' footprints. And as we see hallowed ground coughing up bullets at a Civil War battlefield; long-hidden remains emerging from below the sites of concentration camps; the dangerous, alluring power of fracking; the fragility of the giant redwoods, our planet's oldest living things; the surprises hidden under a Major League ballpark's grass; and the sublime beauty of our few remaining wildest places, one truth becomes blazingly clear: The ground is the easiest resource to forget, and the last we should. Bogard's The Ground Beneath Us is deeply transporting reading that introduces farmers, geologists, ecologists, cartographers, and others in a quest to understand the importance of something too many of us take for granted: dirt. From growth and life to death and loss, and from the subsurface technologies that run our cities to the dwindling number of idyllic Edens that remain, this is the fascinating story of the ground beneath our feet.
Water scarcity is on everyone's mind. Long taken for granted, water availability has entered the realm of economics, politics, and people's food and lifestyle choices. But as anxiety mounts - even as a swath of California farmland has been left fallow and extremist groups worldwide exploit the desperation of people losing livelihoods to desertification - many are finding new routes to water security with key implications for food access, economic resilience, and climate change. Water does not perish, nor require millions of years to form as do fossil fuels. However, water is always on the move. In this timely, important book, Judith D. Schwartz presents a refreshing perspective on water that transcends zero-sum thinking. By allying with the water cycle, we can revive lush, productive landscapes. Like the river in rural Zimbabwe that, thanks to restorative grazing, now flows miles further than in living memory. Or the food forest of oranges, pomegranates, and native fruit-bearing plants in Tucson, grown through harvesting urban wastewater. Or the mini-oasis in West Texas nourished by dew. Animated by stories from around the globe, Water In Plain Sight is an inspiring reminder that fixing the future of our drying planet involves understanding what makes natural systems thrive.
We are, at our base, humus-beings. Our lives are dependent upon the soil and we flourish when we live in this reality. Unfortunately, we have been a part of a centuries-long push to build a new tower of Babel--an attempt to escape our basic dependence on the dirt. This escape has resulted in ecological disaster, unhealthy bodies, and broken communities. In answer to this denial, a habit of mind formed from working close with the soil offers us a way of thinking and seeing that enables us to see the world as it really is. This way of thinking is called agrarianism. In Cultivating Reality, Ragan Sutterfield guides us through the agrarian habit of mind and shows Christians how a theological return to the soil will enliven us again to the joys of creatureliness.
Die bewegendste Australien-Saga seit »Land der Dornen«! Traurig und gedemütigt verlässt Rosemary die Stadt, um sich in der Abgeschiedenheit des australischen Farmlands auf sich selbst zu besinnen. In Farmhelfer Jim findet sie eine starke Schulter. Sie beide wissen, dass ihre Liebe keine Zukunft hat, und doch gehen sie das Wagnis ein. Sie sind glücklich – bis das Schicksal erneut mit aller Macht zuschlägt ...
Die Klimakatastrophe, die wir jetzt erleben, hätte verhindert werden können. Vor dreißig Jahren gab es die Chance, den Planeten zu retten – doch sie wurde verspielt. Die Erde, wie wir sie heute kennen, ist bereits verloren. Nathaniel Rich schildert in dieser dramatischen Reportage, wie eine Gruppe von Wissenschaftlern Ende der siebziger Jahre erstmals erkennt, dass sich die Erderwärmung desaströs beschleunigt, aber auch, welche politischen Maßnahmen notwendig wären. Aber kurz vor dem Durchbruch scheitern sie. Eine historische Reportage, die aktueller nicht sein könnte: Wir bekommen in den kommenden Jahren das zu spüren, was damals versäumt wurde – so wie unser gegenwärtiges Scheitern das Schicksal des Planeten in naher Zukunft besiegelt.
The soil is being contaminated continuously by a large number of pollutants. Among them, heavy metals are an exclusive group of toxicants because they are stable and difficult to disseminate into non-toxic forms. The ever-increasing concentrations of such pollutants in the soil are considered serious threats toward everyone’s health and the environment. Many techniques are used to clean, eliminate, obliterate or sequester these hazardous pollutants from the soil. However, these techniques can be costly, labor intensive, and often disquieting. Phytoremediation is a simple, cost effective, environmental friendly and fast-emerging new technology for eliminating toxic heavy metals and other related soil pollutants. Soil Remediation and Plants provides a common platform for biologists, agricultural engineers, environmental scientists, and chemists, working with a common aim of finding sustainable solutions to various environmental issues. The book provides an overview of ecosystem approaches and phytotechnologies and their cumulative significance in relation to solving various environmental problems. Identifies the molecular mechanisms through which plants are able to remediate pollutants from the soil Examines the challenges and possibilities towards the various phytoremediation candidates Includes the latest research and ongoing progress in phytoremediation
This story takes place in south eastern Alberta about nineteen fifteen (1915), along the western edge of the Cypress hills. Shorty Stout, a drifting cowboy arrives at the A-X ranch, (the AXE), and is given a meal and a bunk. The ranch belongs to Xavier Forrest and his wife Angela, hence the name, A-X. Shorty isnt the kind to lie around so the next morning he is out working and fixing. The first thing he does is to fix the windmill which has been making a racket for weeks. Because he is such a handy person with tools and can do almost any work, he is given a job on the ranch. When spring comes he attends a dance in town with the other hands and on the way back to the ranch he meets up with a widow and her son, Dawn and Matt Ryan. He stops to help them cut some firewood and soon he is working for them every weekend. He fixes fences, builds a log bunkhouse, puts running water in the house and many other jobs that have been neglected because there was no one to do them. When the bunkhouse is completed, a dance is held to show how much everyones help has been appreciated. Meanwhile, out on the range, Shorty and his riding partner Gus, find a hidden valley in the hills, filled with Dawn Ryans cattle. The valley is believed to be the floor of an ancient lake which drained out through the dry gully that is the only entrance. The cattle are separated and some are sold, bringing them some sorely needed cash to help keep the ranch going. Shorty, Dawn and Matt do some exploring and discover a small inner valley that is a small corner of paradise. This small valley is so beautiful that anyone entering it find it hard to even speak until they are back in the main valley. Matt discovers there is fish in the lake in the large valley, and he uses some improvised gear to catch a trout and cook it in the fire after coating it with clay. He and the school teacher, Karen Carter, take a group of students on a survival trip to teach them how to survive if they got lost, and to live off the land. Dawn and Shorty eventually realize they were meant for each other; a fact known to Matt and Angela, Dawns older sister, for some time. Dawn asks Shorty to marry her and he agrees, but before getting married, they ride north to Medicine Hat to file for a homestead, taking in the Lost Valley. The day of the wedding arrives and afterwards, a huge reception and dance is held at the schoolhouse just outside town. About midnight, Matt and the school teacher help the newlyweds escape the party and go off by themselves. The weekend after the wedding, the three homesteaders head for Lost Valley, to get an idea of the land surrounding the valley. This valley has the richest soil and the best grass in Alberta and covers an estimated three hundred acres. Normally, a person is allowed to file on one hundred and sixty acres, but this area , being in the hills is described as waste land and they are allowed to file on a half section , or three hundred and twenty acres each. The government will pay to have the land surveyed, so a surveyor is found to do the job for them. When the land is surveyed and registered in their name, they need to find a way to make a wagon road to the valley, as the only way in is the dry watercourse that had drained the former lake in times long past. Many friends arrive to help with this task, which has to be done before building materials can be hauled into the valley. With much work over a long weekend, a road is made to the valley and the first wagon to ever enter the valley rolls over the newly constructed road. They are now ready to find a site to build a home on the Lost Valley Ranch. Shorty and Dawn spend a night in the Heavenly inner valley and in the morning she tells him he is to be a daddy and that nine months down the road a little girl named Allie will be born, because of one night spent in this enchanted valley.
The #1 international bestseller on climate change that’s been endorsed by policy makers, scientists, writers and energy executives around the world. Tim Flannery’s The Weather Makers contributed in bringing the topic of global warming to worldwide prominence. For the first time, a scientist provided an accessible and comprehensive account of the history, current status, and future impact of climate change, writing what has been acclaimed by reviewers everywhere as the definitive book on global warming. With one out of every five living things on this planet committed to extinction by the levels of greenhouse gases that will accumulate in the next few decades, we are reaching a global climatic tipping point. The Weather Makers is both an urgent warning and a call to arms, outlining the history of climate change, how it will unfold over the next century, and what we can do to prevent a cataclysmic future. Originally somewhat of a global warming skeptic, Tim Flannery spent several years researching the topic and offers a connect-the-dots approach for a reading public who has received patchy or misleading information on the subject. Pulling on his expertise as a scientist to discuss climate change from a historical perspective, Flannery also explains how climate change is interconnected across the planet. This edition includes a new afterword by the author. “An authoritative, scientifically accurate book on global warming that sparkles with life, clarity, and intelligence.” —The Washington Post

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