Historian Sarah Gristwood follows Potter from her constricted Victorian childhood to the success and tragedy of the years 1901-13, when she published nearly all her major books yet was denied love by the death of her fiance. Finally, she traces the last 30 years of Potter's life, when she abandoned books to become a working farmer and pioneer of the conservation movement in the early days of the National Trust. Special features throughout the book will show how Beatrix Potter developed many of her most famous characters, including Peter Rabbit, Mrs. Tiggy-winkle, and Jemima Puddleduck.
When Beatrix Potter died, few people knew the full story of her life. Margaret Lane's remarkable piece of literary detective work, originally published only three years after Beatrix's death, told her story for the first time. Extensively revised in 1985 to include new material that had come to light, and now available in this eBook format, it remains essential reading for anyone interested in the background to the author of the famous Peter Rabbit Tales.
Starting with the publication of The Tale of Peter Rabbit in 1902, Beatrix Potter went on to become one of the world's most successful children's authors. This illustrated biographical eBook takes the reader through the whole of her life, from her Victorian childhood in London to her final years farming in the Lake District. Regarded as a standard work on Beatrix Potter's life, this work has been updated regularly to include fresh material and previously unpublished photographs that have come to light as interest in Beatrix Potter continues to grow.
There was once a little girl who loved to draw and paint. Her name was Beatrix Potter. Although she lived in Victorian London, her heart was in the countryside, and her many pets were real friends. One of them, a rabbit called Peter, became as famous as his owner. Beatrix wrote about him in The Tale of Peter Rabbit. This book tells the fascinating story of how Beatrix became an author and made her life at last in the countryside she loved.
Beatrix Potter was a very private person, yet, luckily for us, she was a prolific letter writer. Through her own words to friends, working colleagues and children we can discover the observant, energetic, affectionate and humorous personality she kept hidden from her public. Her life covers a period of immense social change. The restricted existence of a dutiful Victorian daughter, the background against which she first wrote the story of Peter Rabbit, was very different from that of war-time England where she continued to pioneer countryside conservation until her death.
“An enchanting and original account of Beatrix Potter's life and her love of plants and gardening.” —Judy Taylor, vice president of the Beatrix Potter Society There aren’t many books more beloved than The Tale of Peter Rabbit and even fewer authors as iconic as Beatrix Potter. More than 150 million copies of her books have sold worldwide and interest in her work and life remains high. And her characters—Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddle Duck, and all the rest—exist in a charmed world filled with flowers and gardens. Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life is the first book to explore the origins of Beatrix Potter’s love of gardening and plants and show how this passion came to be reflected in her work. The book begins with a gardener’s biography, highlighting the key moments and places throughout her life that helped define her, including her home Hill Top Farm in England's Lake District. Next, the reader follows Beatrix Potter through a year in her garden, with a season-by-season overview of what is blooming that truly brings her gardens alive. The book culminates in a traveler’s guide, with information on how and where to visit Potter’s gardens today.
THE FAIRY CARAVAN is the story of a miniature circus, William and Alexander's Travelling Circus. It is no ordinary circus, for Alexander is a highland terrier and William is Pony Billy who draws the caravan. Beatrix Potter wrote this chapter book for older children towards the end of her writing career. She wrote it for her own pleasure and at the request of friends in America who shared her love of the Lake District and north country tales.
The world famous artwork of Beatrix Potter needs little introduction — it is as beloved as the familiar children’s stories it illustrates. But few know of her work in the gardens and interiors of Hill Top, the farmhouse Potter purchased in 1905. The estate and surrounding scenery inspired many of Potter’s stories and illustrations, and this gorgeously illustrated book shows Potter’s homes and her magnificent gardens beside those drawings, revealing the real-life sources for Peter Rabbit and many other Potter classics. The book also includes letters and diary excerpts, further exploring the relationship between Potter’s home in the Lake District and her iconic artwork. For those fans of Potter who want to delve further into her aesthetic underpinnings, this intimate look into Potter’s private world is a must-have.
This story of the real Beatrix Potter, a Londoner, deals with the 40 years of her later life which was spent in the heart of the English Lake District. It is based on the author's interviews with people who knew her in her home setting of Sawrey, near Hawkshead.
Beatrix Potter is one of the world's bestselling, most cherished authors, whose books have enchanted generations of children for over a hundred years. Yet how she achieved this legendary status is just one of several stories of her remarkable and unexpected life. Inspired by the twenty-three "tales," Matthew Dennison takes a selection of quotations from Potter's stories and uses them to explore her multi-faceted life and character: repressed Victorian daughter; thwarted lover; artistic genius; formidable countrywoman. They chart her transformation from a young girl with a love of animals and fairy tales into a bestselling author and canny businesswoman, so deeply unusual for the Victorian era in which she grew up. Embellished with photographs of Potter's life and her own illustrations, this biography will delight anyone who has been touched by Beatrix Potter's work. For the fans of her children’s literature who want to know the real-life animals behind Mrs. Tiggy Winkle, Jemima Puddle duck, and of course, Peter Rabbit.
While the dolls are away two naughty, curious mice explore the doll's house and steal their furniture.
This simplified biographical eBook of Beatrix Potter and the history of the Peter Rabbit book is ideal for the younger reader.
Once upon a time there was a little fat comfortable grey squirrel, called Timmy Tiptoes. He had a nest thatched with leaves in the top of a tall tree; and he had a little squirrel wife called Goody.
Provides a behind-the-scenes look at the motion picture with facsimilies of the shooting script and a section on costumes.
To contemporaries, the Wars of the Roses were known collectively as a “cousins' war.” The series of dynastic conflicts that tore apart the ruling Plantagenet family in fifteenth-century England was truly a domestic drama, as fraught and intimate as any family feud before or since. As acclaimed historian Sarah Gristwood reveals in Blood Sisters, while the events of this turbulent time are usually described in terms of the male leads who fought and died seeking the throne, a handful of powerful women would prove just as decisive as their kinfolks' clashing armies. These mothers, wives, and daughters were locked in a web of loyalty and betrayal that would ultimately change the course of English history. In a captivating, multigenerational narrative, Gristwood traces the rise and rule of the seven most critical women in the wars: from Marguerite of Anjou, wife of the Lancastrian Henry VI, who steered the kingdom in her insane husband's stead; to Cecily Neville, matriarch of the rival Yorkist clan, whose son Edward IV murdered his own brother to maintain power; to Margaret Beaufort, who gave up her own claim to the throne in favor of her son, a man who would become the first of a new line of Tudor kings. A richly drawn, absorbing epic, Blood Sisters is a tale of hopeful births alongside bloody deaths, of romance as well as brutal pragmatism. It is a story of how women, and the power that women could wield, helped to end the Wars of the Roses, paving the way for the Tudor age—and the creation of modern England.
Peter Rabbit, Mr. McGregor, and many other Beatrix Potter characters remain in the hearts of millions. However, though Potter is a household name around the world, few know the woman behind the illustrations. Her personal life, including a romantic relationship with her publisher, Norman Warne, and her significant achievements outside of children's literature remain largely unknown. In Linda Lear's enchanting new biography, we get the life story of this incredible, funny, and independent woman. As one of the first female naturalists in the world, Potter brought the beauty and importance of nature back into the imagination at a time when plunder was more popular than preservation. Through her art she sought to encourage conservation and change the world. With never before seen illustrations and intimate detail, Lear goes beyond our perrenial fascination with Potter as a writer and illustrator of children's books, and delves deeply into the life of a most unusual and gifted woman--one whose art was timeless, and whose generosity left an indelible imprint on the countryside.
Traces the life of the children's writer and illustrator, describes influences on her work, and shows examples of her sketches and paintings
The Story of the English Garden is the National Trust's accessible history of the nation's gardens, sumptuously illustrated and artfully curated. From tiny medieval gardens to vast Georgian parks, from Victorian glasshouses crammed with exotic specimens to the elegant outdoor 'rooms' of the Edwardians and the functional, ecologically aware gardens of today, this book explores the love affair between the English and their gardens for over 500 years. It's a fascinating story about passion – and power and politics too. The book is beautifully illustrated throughout and includes new photography of some of the most influential gardens in the world, including Sissinghurst. Drawn from the National Trust's extensive archives, The Story of the English Garden is the definitive guide to Europe's greatest collection of historic gardens – a rich celebration of World Heritage sites, rare and exotic plants and groundbreaking architectural design.
A special anniversary edition to celebrate 150 years since Beatrix Potter's birth. DK's The Ultimate Peter Rabbit traces the true story behind the mischievous rabbit who has captured the hearts of children all around the world. See the first Peter Rabbit merchandise and his journey from page to stage to screen. Discover the real-life places that inspired the tales, from Squirrel Nutkin's lake to Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle's hillside. Explore Tom Kitten's farmhouse in the Lake District and pore over original archive illustrations, sketches, and photographs. The Ultimate Peter Rabbit has been updated to continue the story of how Peter Rabbit has grown and evolved in the 21st century.
This ebook has been optimised for viewing on colour devices. Between the ages of 15 and 30 Beatrix Potter kept a secret diary written in code. When the code was cracked by Leslie Linder more than 20 years after her death, the diary revealed a remarkable picture of upper middle-class life in late Victorian Britain. This book provides an illuminating insight into the personality and inspiration of one of the world's best loved children's authors.

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