In The Theft of History Jack Goody builds on his own previous work to extend further his highly influential critique of what he sees as the pervasive Eurocentric or occidentalist biases of so much western historical writing, and the consequent 'theft' by the West of the achievements of other cultures in the invention of (notably) democracy, capitalism, individualism and love. Goody, one of the world's most distinguished anthropologists, raises questions about theorists, historians and methodology, and proposes a new comparative approach to cross-cultural analysis which allows for more scope in examining history than an East versus West style.
The theft of the Jules Rimet Trophy in 1966 is one of the most unusual stories in the history of football. The full story of what really happened has never before been told, and those parts that have been told have contained and perpetuated a number of errors. This volume sets out to put the record straight by telling the complete story. It is based on official FIFA and FA files, as well as information drawn from the archives of the German and Brazilian football authorities, police records, complementary newspaper reports, and most importantly, evidence gathered form those involved with the case itself. It presents a factual account not only of the parts that have become public knowledge, but also of the activities that went on away from the glare of publicity and which have never been told in detail before.
An international gang set out to steal the Sarum Magna Carta. It is protected by the most sophisticated security measures, but that won’t be allowed to get in their way. Pitted against the gang, Superintendent Roger West of Scotland Yard has to recover the document and solve one of the most ambitious crimes met in his long career.
Right from the enslavement era through to the colonial and contemporary eras, Africans have been denied their human essence – portrayed as indistinct from animals or beasts for imperial burdens, Africans have been historically dispossessed and exploited. Postulating the theory of global jurisprudential apartheid, the book accounts for biases in various legal systems, norms, values and conventions that bind Africans while affording impunity to Western states. Drawing on contemporary notions of animism, transhumanism, posthumanism and science and technology studies, the book critically interrogates the possibility of a jurisprudence of anticipation which is attentive to the emergent New World Order that engineers ‘human beings to become nonhumans’ while ‘nonhumans become humans’. Connecting discourses on decoloniality with jurisprudence in the areas of family law, environment, indigenisation, property, migration, constitutionalism, employment and labour law, commercial law and Ubuntu, the book also juggles with emergent issues around Earth Jurisprudence, ecocentrism, wild law, rights of nature, Earth Court and Earth Tribunal. Arguing for decoloniality that attends to global jurisprudential apartheid., this tome is handy for legal scholars and practitioners, social scientists, civil society organisations, policy makers and researchers interested in transformation, decoloniality and Pan-Africanism.
A collaborative volume aimed at correcting the view of China as a failed version of the West.
In the three centuries that followed Vasco da Gama's discovery of the sea route from Europe to India, European powers made a beeline for India's fabled riches, its spices, gold and gems. Though they ostensibly came for trade and commerce, and the thrill of discovering a new land, the lines between exploration and exploitation soon blurred. The Theft of India documents the intense rivalry for spoils that played out between the British, the French, the Dutch and the Portuguese, and the impact this had on Indians. Roy Moxham's work, though, is no dry study of textual materials. He supplements these accounts with an exhaustive study of academic works on the subject. The result is an unflattering picture of the 'civilized' West as it systematically strips India of its riches. The Theft of India is a nuanced, important and highly readable addition to the study of imperialism and its dehumanizing effects on the colonized.
The explosive truth about America’s Revolution–a bloody civil war that was won largely in the South–that modern liberals have kept buried until now. At the darkest hour of the American Revolution, in 1780, when there was little reason to hope, the British went down South and overplayed their hand. By burning the bibles of backwoodsmen and threatening their honor, the British ignited a firestorm in the most spectacular, unusual, and decisive battle of the war. Ordinary folk from throughout the Southern colonies spontaneously banded together and rode for hundreds of miles to attack and destroy British forces at King’s Mountain. The killing didn’t stop at King’s Mountain, but the war did. Never heard of the massacre that saved the American Revolution? No idea that liberty was actually won in the South? Red state values of God, guns and guts are being dismantled by leftists airbrushing our past in order to “transform” our future. Grand Theft History features shocking new evidence that exposes the latest battlefield in the culture wars–American history.
A history of shoplifting, revealing the roots of our modern dilemma. Rachel Shteir's The Steal is the first serious study of shoplifting, tracking the fascinating history of this ancient crime. Dismissed by academia and the mainstream media and largely misunderstood, shoplifting has become the territory of moralists, mischievous teenagers, tabloid television, and self-help gurus. But shoplifting incurs remarkable real-life costs for retailers and consumers. The "crime tax"-the amount every American family loses to shoplifting-related price inflation-is more than $400 a year. Shoplifting cost American retailers $11.7 billion in 2009. The theft of one $5.00 item from Whole Foods can require sales of hundreds of dollars to break even. The Steal begins when shoplifting entered the modern record as urbanization and consumerism made London into Europe's busiest mercantile capital. Crossing the channel to nineteenth-century Paris, Shteir tracks the rise of the department store and the pathologizing of shoplifting as kleptomania. In 1960s America, shoplifting becomes a symbol of resistance when the publication of Abbie Hoffman's Steal This Book popularizes shoplifting as an antiestablishment act. Some contemporary analysts see our current epidemic as a response to a culture of hyper-consumerism; others question whether its upticks can be tied to economic downturns at all. Few provide convincing theories about why it goes up or down. Just as experts can't agree on why people shoplift, they can't agree on how to stop it. Shoplifting has been punished by death, discouraged by shame tactics, and protected against by high-tech surveillance. Shoplifters have been treated by psychoanalysis, medicated with pharmaceuticals, and enforced by law to attend rehabilitation groups. While a few individuals have abandoned their sticky-fingered habits, shoplifting shows no signs of slowing. In The Steal, Shteir guides us through a remarkable tour of all things shoplifting-we visit the Woodbury Commons Outlet Mall, where boosters run rampant, watch the surveillance footage from Winona Ryder's famed shopping trip, and learn the history of antitheft technology. A groundbreaking study, The Steal shows us that shoplifting in its many guises-crime, disease, protest-is best understood as a reflection of our society, ourselves.
Weltgeschichte ist lange Zeit als eine Geschichte des Aufstiegs und Niedergangs einer kleinen Zahl von „Hochkulturen“ geschrieben worden. Unter diesen Kulturen schienen Europa oder der atlantische „Westen“ während der letzten Jahrhunderte nach den Kriterien Macht, Wohlstand und kulturelle Kreativität zu dominieren. Das neue sechsbändige Werk zur Weltgeschichte, das von einem Team von Historikerinnen und Historikern vorwiegend aus den USA und Deutschland erarbeitet wird und das gleichzeitig bei C.H.Beck und Harvard University Press erscheint, verabschiedet sich von diesen Traditionen. Es leugnet die Errungenschaften des Westens nicht, stellt sie aber in den größeren Zusammenhang gleichzeitiger Entwicklungen in anderen Teilen der Welt. Dadurch wird das allmähliche, dabei aber krisenhafte Entstehen des heutigen dicht integrierten und pluralistischen Weltzusammenhangs sichtbar. Erstmals werden in diesen Bänden die Ergebnisse von mehreren Jahrzehnten internationaler Forschung zur Vorgeschichte der Globalisierung und zur Entwicklung von Gesellschaften und politischen Ordnungen auf allen Kontinenten von führenden Experten zusammenfassend dargestellt. Weltgeschichte erscheint hier nicht als Aneinanderreihung einzelner Spezialgeschichten. Die Aufmerksamkeit richtet sich auf bisher wenig beachtete Querbeziehungen und Wechselwirkungen: auf Migrationen von Einzelnen und Gruppen und die Gründung neuer Gesellschaften, auf die interkontinentale Ausbreitung von Technologien, Religionen oder politischen Ideen, auf globale Kommunikationsnetze, Handelsströme und Konsummuster, auf Imperialismus, Kolonialismus und großräumige Kriege.
Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights Was the Boston Tea Party the first WTO-style protest against transnational corporations? Did Supreme Court sell out America's citizens in the nineteenth century, with consequences lasting to this day? Is there a way for American citizens to recover democracy of, by, and for the people? Thom Hartmann takes on these most difficult questions and tells a startling story that will forever change your understanding of American history. He begins by uncovering an original eyewitness account of the Boston Tea Party and demonstrates that it was provoked not by "taxation without representation" as is commonly suggested but by the specific actions of the East India Company, which represented the commericial interests of the British elite. Hartmann then describes the history of the Fourteenth Amendment--created at the end of the Civil War to grant basic rights to freed slaves--and how it has been used by lawyers representing corporate interests to extend additional rights to businesses far more frequently than to freed slaves. Prior to 1886, corporations were referred to in U.S. law as "artificial persons." but in 1886, after a series of cases brought by lawyers representing the expanding railroad interests, the Supreme Court ruled that corporations were "persons" and entitled to the same rights granted to people under the Bill of Rights. Since this ruling, America has lost the legal structures that allowed for people to control corporate behavior. As a result, the largest transnational corporations fill a role today that has historically been filled by kings. They control most of the world's wealth and exert power over the lives of most of the world's citizens. Their CEOs are unapproachable and live lives of nearly unimaginable wealth and luxury. They've become the rudder that steers the ship of much human experience, and they're steering it by their prime value--growth and profit and any expense--a value that has become destructive for life on Earth. This new feudalism was not what our Founders--Federalists and Democratic Republicans alike--envisioned for America. It's time for "we, the people" to take back our lives. Hartmann proposes specific legal remedies that could truly save the world from political, economic, and ecological disaster.
Containing more than 450 entries, this easy-to-read encyclopedia provides concise information about the history of and recent trends in drug use and drug abuse in the United States—a societal problem with an estimated cost of $559 billion a year. • Contains more than 450 detailed entries on topics ranging from drugs themselves—such as alcohol, codeine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamines—to key individuals like Harry Anslinger to organizations such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) • Covers the latest developments in U.S. policies and public attitudes toward drugs and drug use • Provides citations with each entry to guide users to other valuable research resources • Features carefully selected primary documents—including excerpts from important laws, policies, and campaigns—that have shaped American drug policy over the decades
 Passed by Congress in July 1787, the Northwest Ordinance laid out the basic form of government for all U.S. territory north of the Ohio River. That summer, the Constitutional Convention drafted the defining document of the American Republic as a whole. A bargain struck between Congress and the Convention outlawed slavery north of the Ohio, but gave Southern states a Congressional and Electoral College representation based on population figures that included slaves—each valued at three-fifths of a free white citizen. Because of this agreement, the western lands acquired from Great Britain after the Revolutionary War were divided into slave and free states—a compromise which, when it failed, precipitated the Civil War 74 years later. For years most historians denied that this political deal took place. Drawing on contemporary letters and documents, this detailed analysis re-examines the Ordinance and how Congress silently permitted the South’s “peculiar institution” to move westward.
As collective violence erupts in many regions throughout the world, we often hear media reports that link the outbreaks to age-old ethnic or religious hostilities, thereby freeing the state from responsibility. Through five case studies of both rural and urban public violence, political scientist Paul Brass shows that government and the media often select and focus most on those that support existing relations of power in state and society.
These two volumes capture the vicissitudes of Italian public and private law from their antecedents in the Dark Ages to their realization in more modern times.
Published in 1883, this three-volume account of English criminal law's development since 1200 remains a classic work of legal historical scholarship.
This book challenges the ethnocentric bias of mainstream accounts of the 'Rise of the West'. John Hobson argues that these accounts assume that Europeans have pioneered their own development, and that the East has been a passive by-stander. In contrast Hobson describes the rise of what he calls the 'Oriental West'. He argues that Europe first assimilated many Eastern inventions, and then appropriated Eastern resources through imperialism. Hobson's book thus propels the hitherto marginalised Eastern peoples to the forefront of the story of progressive world history.
If you can walk a mile in my moccasins, you will know how I feel; but to really understand the enormity of my pain, you need to be a Macedonian for a day or two. Perhaps, it is some kind of curse that we are forced to endure on a daily basis, to fend off charges of various kinds with magnitude leveled at us from our friends and foes alike. As soon as we recover from one attack, there comes another more sinister and more menacing than the previous one. At times, it seems that our adversaries are preoccupied with our history and cannot, for a given moment, relinquish their thirst and hunger for anything Macedonian. This book is a compendium of thoughts and responses formulated to prove to the world that we, the Macedonians, as people do exist. That we still use our own Macedonian Language, that we still maintain and cultivate our Macedonian traditions and customs, and that we still identify ourselves as Macedonians and place our hopes and our beliefs in justice and equality for all. The book offers glimpses into our continuous struggle for survival. Yes, it is a feeble voice in the dark, but a voice nevertheless, that isnt going to die any time soon. This incessant will to survive is stronger and more powerful than the insatiable appetite for our esteemed heritage exhibited by our enemy. Perhaps it is a blessing, a sign for revival and a heavenly energy that uplifts and nourishes the soul. Perhaps, it is the old Macedonian spirit that keeps us going. The more they attack us, the stronger and more resilient we become. Through the topics discussed in the book, the reader will have a chance to see and understand the other side of the story. In the words of Marquez Garcia, Our enemies have crushed many roses before but they havent succeeded in stopping the spring from coming. Until next time?Ǫ

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