More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.
Lecture notes from Alan Ansen, later Auden's secretary and friend, from Auden's course taught during 1946-1947 at the New School for Social Research form the basis for this work on Auden's interpretation of all of the Shakespeare's plays.
Edward III is a major addition to the Shakespearean canon, and is published here for the first time in an authoritative edition of Shakespeare's works. Presenting this fully-annotated, modern-spelling text of Edward III, Giorgio Melchiori does not claim that Shakespeare is the sole author, but author of a significant part of the play, the extent of which is discussed in detail. The introduction explores the historical background and the genesis of the play in the context of contemporary theatrical practice and of Shakespeare's own early cycle of history plays. It stresses the original ideological stance and the theatrical qualities of the play as a whole. The commentary examines in depth the play's linguistic and poetical features, while an extensive appendix on the use of sources explains the stages of its composition.
Shakespeare knew like few others how to dramatize the gossipy lives of kings. More importantly, he knew that just because it was history, that didn't mean it was boring. Today, however, Shakespeare's histories can be a bit of a drudge to plow through. Let BookCaps help with this modern translation of the classic history play. If you have struggled in the past reading Shakespeare, then BookCaps can help you out. This book is a modern translation of Richard II. The original text is also presented in the book, along with a comparable version of both text. We all need refreshers every now and then. Whether you are a student trying to cram for that big final, or someone just trying to understand a book more, BookCaps can help. We are a small, but growing company, and are adding titles every month.
Macbeth is one of Shakespeare's most performed and studied tragedies. This major new Arden edition offers students detailed on-page commentary notes highlighting meaning and theatrical ideas and themes, as well as an illustrated, lengthy introduction setting the play in its historical, theatrical and critical context and outlining the recent debates about Middleton's possible co-authorship of some scenes. A comprehensive and informative edition ideal for students and teachers seeking to explore the play in depth, whether in the classroom or on the stage.
John Dover Wilson's New Shakespeare, published between 1921 and 1966, became the classic Cambridge edition of Shakespeare's plays and poems until the 1980s. The series, long since out-of-print, is now reissued. Each work is available both individually and as a set, and each contains a lengthy and lively introduction, main text, and substantial notes and glossary printed at the back. The edition, which began with The Tempest and ended with The Sonnets, put into practice the techniques and theories that had evolved under the 'New Bibliography'. Remarkably by today's standards, although it took the best part of half a century to produce, the New Shakespeare involved only a small band of editors besides Dover Wilson himself. As the volumes took shape, many of Dover Wilson's textual methods acquired general acceptance and became an established part of later editorial practice, for example in the Arden and New Cambridge Shakespeares.
Twenty-six original essays by leading theorists and historians of the pre-seventeenth-century English stage chart a paradigmatic shift within the field. In contrast to the traditional emphasis on individual authors, the contributors to this storehouse of new historical information and critical insight explore the place of the stage within the larger society, as well as issues of performance and physical space, providing an innovative approach to both literary studies and cultural history.
Presents a collection of fifty-nine familiar and unfamiliar stories by such writers as John Cheever, Ray Bradbury, Flannery O'Connor, Edmund White, and Richard Wright.

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