From California to Maine--check out the greatest craft breweries in the United States! Fifty fascinating states, 50 awesome breweries, and 50+ handcrafted beers--what more could you ask for? In The United States of Craft Beer, beer expert and homebrewer Jess Lebow invites you along on his state-by-state exploration of America's greatest breweries. From Jack's Abby Brewing in Massachusetts to the Maui Brewing Company in Hawaii, this guide teaches you everything you need to know about the people who make the nation's best-tasting beers and the innovative brewing methods that help create the perfect batch. Each intoxicating entry also highlights other popular beers that can be found throughout that state, so that you can sample every delicious sip the United States has to offer. Complete with photos of the beers and breweries, The United States of Craft Beer gives you the lowdown on all things craft beer as you make your way across the country.
"A collection of 38 homebrew recipes based on craft beers of various styles from 23 brewers around the United States. Illustrated with color photography"--
"Leveraging her love and knowledge of fine beer, Ashley Routson's book highlights how and why craft beer is such a popular (and growing) industry"--
In the 1970s a handful of brewers in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia were tired of the traditional light and flavorless American beers and began exploring ways to make better beer brewed from local ingredients. The “microbrews” (as they were originally called) caught on, and the Northwest quickly became the center of the craft beer movement that is now flourishing and spreading across the United States, Canada, and the world. Craft Beers of the Pacific Northwest is a suds-soaked adventure through the 115 key breweries and brew pubs in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Lisa Morrison, aka The Beer Goddess, has included every brewery worth visiting, from pioneers like McMenamins, whose Hillsdale Brewery & Public House in southwest Portland was the first brewpub in Oregon, to a new generation of start ups like Upright Brewing, a production brewery that is creating French-Belgian inspired, open-fermented beers. With 18 walkable pub-crawls, a beer primer and glossary, a list of the best bottle shops, Craft Beers of the Pacific Northwest has everything a beer lover needs to navigate the best of what the region has to offer.
This edited collection examines the various influences, relationships, and developments beer has had from distinctly spatial perspectives. The chapters explore the functions of beer and brewing from unique and sometimes overlapping historical, economic, cultural, environmental and physical viewpoints. Topics from authors – both geographers and non-geographers alike – have examined the influence of beer throughout history, the migration of beer on local to global scales, the dichotomous nature of global production and craft brewing, the neolocalism of craft beers, and the influence local geography has had on beer’s most essential ingredients: water, starch (malt), hops, and yeast. At the core of each chapter remains the integration of spatial perspectives to effectively map the identity, changes, challenges, patterns and locales of the geographies of beer.
Raise a pint to the WORLD’S BEST BEERS! This extensive exploration of the 1,000 tastiest brews on earth is not your average guidebook—it’s a complete look into the history, production, and flavor of every beer worth drinking. “Brewery Profiles” take you country-by-country to the finest breweries in places like Argentina, Japan, Germany, Belgium, Britain, and New Zealand, and provide fun facts, stats, and anecdotes. There’s even an explanation of which beers go with which foods. Next time you eat shellfish, try it with a Pilsner. Having a hearty stout? It pairs perfectly with some vanilla ice cream. So drink up!
"A full-color illustrated travel guide to notable craft breweries of the northeast and mid-Atlantic states"--
The days of choosing between a handful of imports and a convenience store six-pack are long gone. The beer landscape in America has changed dramatically in the twenty-first century, as the nation has experienced an explosion in craft beer brewing and consumption. Nowhere is this truer than in Virginia, where more than two hundred independent breweries create beers of an unprecedented variety and serve an increasingly knowledgeable, and thirsty, population of beer enthusiasts. As Lee Graves shows in his definitive new guide to Virginia beer, the Old Dominion's central role in the current beer boom is no accident. Beer was on board when English settlers landed at Jamestown in 1607, and the taste for beer and expertise in brewing have only grown in the generations since. Graves offers an invaluable survey of key breweries throughout the Virginia, profiling the people and the businesses in each region that have made the state a rising star in the industry. The book is extensively illustrated and suggests numerous brewery tours that will point you in the right direction for your statewide beer crawl. From small farm breweries in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains to cavernous facilities in urban rings around the state, Virginians have created a golden age for flavorful beer. This book shows you how to best appreciate it.
"Lager explores the history, styles, brewing techniques, and allure of the world's most popular type of beer"--
Explore the vibrant world of craft beer with Lonely Planet. We've selected some of the finest tap rooms, bars and breweries that thirsty travellers can visit in 30 countries around the world. Discover how to find them, which beers to sample, and learn about local places of interest with our recommended itineraries. Each country is introduced by a beer expert and includes regional beverages that shouldn't be missed. There's a world of great beer to taste - go and discover it! So why go beer touring, especially when it's easy and cheap to find interesting craft beers in your local shop? For starters, craft beer doesn't travel too well and is affected by changes in temperature and long distances. Another is that, due to the explosion in small-scale breweries, many great beers aren't distributed outside of their city or region. Beer often tastes better the closer it is to home, especially if that's straight from a tap in a tank in the actual brewery. The craft beer revolution has seen waves of breweries open up to the public, not just in the United States, the UK and Australia, where the trend is well established, but all over the world. Visit European beer capitals like Belgium, Italy and Germany, and sample local favourites in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. In Asia, explore hotspots in Japan, Vietnam and China, then venture to South America, Africa and the Middle East. Each brewery is accompanied by a selection of sightseeing ideas and activities, from local museums and galleries, to great hikes or bike rides. The book also features fun sections on beer trails, hangover cures and the world's wildest beers. There's also practical advice like how to ask for a beer in the local language and the ideal snacks to accompany your drink. About Lonely Planet: Started in 1973, Lonely Planet has become the world's leading travel guide publisher with guidebooks to every destination on the planet, as well as an award-winning website, a suite of mobile and digital travel products, and a dedicated traveller community. Lonely Planet's mission is to enable curious travellers to experience the world and to truly get to the heart of the places they find themselves in. TripAdvisor Travelers' Choice Awards 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 winner in Favorite Travel Guide category 'Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other.' - New York Times 'Lonely Planet. It's on everyone's bookshelves; it's in every traveller's hands. It's on mobile phones. It's on the Internet. It's everywhere, and it's telling entire generations of people how to travel the world.' - Fairfax Media (Australia)
This is a thoroughly revised edition of the Historical Atlas of Colorado, which was coauthored by Tom Noel and published in 1994. Chock-full of the best and latest information on Colorado, this new edition features thirty new chapters, updated text, more than 100 color maps and 100 color photos, and a best-of listing of Colorado authors and books, as well as a guide to hundreds of tourist attractions. Colorado received its name (Spanish for “red”) after much debate and many possibilities, including Idaho (an “Indian” name meaning “gem of the mountains” later discovered to be a fabrication) and Yampa (Ute for “bear”). Noel includes other little-known but significant facts about the state, from its status as first state in the Union to elect women to its legislature, to its controversial “highest state” designation, elevated by the 2013 legalization of recreational cannabis. Noel and cartographer Carol Zuber-Mallison map and describe Colorado’s spectacular geography and its fascinating past. The book’s eight parts survey natural Colorado, from rivers and mountains to dinosaurs and mammals; history, from prehistoric peoples to twenty-first-century Color-oddities; mining and manufacturing, from the gold rush to alternative energy sources; agriculture, including wineries and brewpubs; transportation, from stagecoach lines to light rail; modern Colorado, from the New Deal to the present (including politics, history, and information on lynchings, executions, and prisons); recreation, covering not only hiking and skiing but also literary locales and Colorado in the movies; and tourism, encompassing historic landmarks, museums, and even cemeteries. In short, this book has information—and surprises—that anyone interested in Colorado will relish.
With information on siting, planting, tending, harvesting, processing, and brewing It’s hard to think about beer these days without thinking about hops. The runaway craft beer market’s convergence with the ever-expanding local foods movement is helping to spur a local-hops renaissance. The demand from craft brewers for local ingredients to make beer—such as hops and barley—is robust and growing. That’s good news for farmers looking to diversify, but the catch is that hops have not been grown commercially in the eastern United States for nearly a century. Today, farmers from Maine to North Carolina are working hard to respond to the craft brewers’ desperate call for locally grown hops. But questions arise: How best to create hop yards—virtual forests of 18-foot poles that can be expensive to build? How to select hop varieties, and plant and tend the bines, which often take up to three years to reach full production? How to best pick, process, and price them for market? And, how best to manage the fungal diseases and insects that wiped out the eastern hop industry 100 years ago, and which are thriving in the hotter and more humid states thanks to climate change? Answers to these questions can be found in The Hop Grower’s Handbook—the only book on the market about raising hops sustainably, on a small scale, for the commercial craft beer market in the Northeast. Written by hop farmers and craft brewery owners Laura Ten Eyck and Dietrich Gehring, The Hop Grower’s Handbook is a beautifully photographed and illustrated book that weaves the story of their Helderberg Hop Farm with the colorful history of New York and New England hop farming, relays horticultural information about the unusual hop plant and the mysterious resins it produces that give beer a distinctively bitter flavor, and includes an overview of the numerous native, heirloom, and modern varieties of hops and their purposes. The authors also provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the beer-brewing process—critical for hop growers to understand in order be able to provide the high-quality product brewers want to buy—along with recipes from a few of their favorite home and micro-brewers. The book also provides readers with detailed information on: • Selecting, preparing, and designing a hop yard site, including irrigation; • Tending to the hops, with details on best practices to manage weeds, insects, and diseases; and, • Harvesting, drying, analyzing, processing, and pricing hops for market. The overwhelming majority of books and resources devoted to hop production currently available are geared toward the Pacific Northwest’s large-scale commercial growers, who use synthetic pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, and fertilizers and deal with regionally specific climate, soils, weeds, and insect populations. Ten Eyck and Gehring, however, focus on farming hops sustainably. While they relay their experience about growing in a new Northeastern climate subject to the higher temperatures and volatile cycles of drought and deluge brought about by global warming, this book will be an essential resource for home-scale and small-scale commercial hops growers in all regions.
The craft brew revolution has spread south. This all-new guidebook profiles the Sunshine State's 66 breweries and brewpubs.
Red, White, and Brew is the ultimate beer run across the United States, during which Brian Yaeger visits fourteen breweries of various sizes and talks to founders, owners, brewmasters, consumers, and anyone else he meets on his odyssey and who enjoys the making, tasting, and appreciating of brews. Red, White, and Brew pursues the roots of brewers who brought their craft with them from their homeland and investigates how the tradition is faring today and where it may head in the future. Covering everything from fifth-generation family-run brewing companies to first-wave microbreweries, this book is a travelogue, guide, and genealogical study of beer families and homebrewers from Portland, Maine, to Portland, Oregon. It is filled with eclectic characters and shrewd businesspeople who populate an industry as old as the New World, and who produce liquid philanthropy, one keg at a time.
"A resource guide for both beginners and beer geeks explaining beer styles and characteristics, taste elements, interactions, and providing specific food pairings"--
Charting the birth and growth of craft beer across the United States, Tom Acitelli offers an epic, story-driven account of one of the most inspiring and surprising American grassroots movements. In 1975, there was a single craft brewery in the United States; today there are more than 2,000. Now this once-fledgling movement has become ubiquitous nationwide—there's even a honey ale brewed at the White House. This book not only tells the stories of the major figures and businesses within the movement, but it also ties in the movement with larger American culinary developments. It also charts the explosion of the mass-market craft beer culture, including magazines, festivals, home brewing, and more. This entertaining and informative history brims with charming, remarkable stories, which together weave a very American business tale of formidable odds and refreshing success.

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