What is the bond between the human psyche and the living planet that nurtured us, and all of life, into existence? What is the link between our own mental health and the health of the greater biosphere? In this "bold, ambitious, philosophical essay" (Publishers Weekly), historian and cultural critic Roszak explores the relationships between psychology, ecology, and new scientific insights into systems in nature. Drawing on our understanding of the evolutionary, self-organizing universe, Roszak illuminates our rootedness in the greater web of life and explores the relationship between our own sanity and the larger-than-human world. The Voice of the Earth seeks to bridge the centuries-old split between the psychological and the ecological with a paradigm which sees the needs of the planet and the needs of the person as a continuum. The Earth's cry for rescue from the punishing weight of the industrial system we have created is our own cry for a scale and quality of life that will free us to become whole and healthy. This second edition contains a new afterword by the author.
An explanation of how humans' psychological and physical well-being is linked to the health of the planet probes such controversial issues as the Anthropic Principle and the Gaia Hypothesis. 20,000 first printing.
In this volume scholars from around the world read the story of the Earth in major Wisdom Traditions using the ecojustice principles outlined in Volume 1, 'Readings from the Perspective of Earth'. These readings uncover a range of fresh perspectives about Earth in seeking to discover where the voices of Earth are suppressed or heard in the Wisdom texts. Some texts reveal an ecokinship between Earth and Wisdom. Texts from Job challenge a cosmic model that gives priority to heaven over Earth. Still others challenge the mandate to dominate in Genesis 1.28. In many texts, Wisdom provides a vehicle for a new kinship with Earth. Comtributors include Jenny Wightman, Hendrik Viviers, Carole Fontaine, Izak Spangenberg, Alice Sinnott, Willie van Heerden, Katherine Dell, Dale Patrick, Marie Turner and Laura Hobgood-Oster.
Nwoke emphasizes that God still speaks today, and he illustrates different methods by which God speaks to his children. Whether dreams, prophesies, visions, the word of God, or audible voice, he can only be heard by those who create the atmosphere to enable them to hear him.
This book is a compendium of insights from sermons and books of great preachers of the Word of God. It illuminates how God created the world in six days following His blueprint. It reveals that man is created in the image of God. It explains the significance of the nation of Israel in God’s divine program. It discloses the origin and effect of sin on all of humanity. It disputes the atheistic opinions of the existence of God. It concludes with the fulfillment of God’s plan as the King of Kings of the combined heaven and earth in the New Jerusalem. This book was written with the guidance of the Holy Spirit to bring some light to this darkening world. As Perry Como’s song goes: “It is better to light just one little candle than to stumble in the dark.”
Provides a critique of reason, demanding that we take greater responsibility for nature and other people.
Are you searching for the absolute truth, or answers to why the planets most horrific events seem to be unfolding right now? Events like hurricanes, earthquakes, economic woes, viruses, terrorism and war. This book will give answers about history, philosophy, science, and theology, conspiracy theories, secret societies, angels and demons, and the spiritual realm. If you’re looking for the Holy Grail or the bloodline of Christ, this book will provide answers. Possibly today’s most controversial book.
Following Journey Into the Flame—“a spiritual adventure of the first order” (New York Times bestselling author Felix Palma)—comes the second part in a post-apocalyptic trilogy about a set of ancient books that hold the key to humanity’s survival. In 2030, after the Great Disruption brought humanity to the brink of a second dark age, the Chronicles of Satraya were discovered, restoring hope in the world. But the secret powers in their pages remained largely unknown. There were some, however, who understood them. The Reges Hominum, the Kings of Men, a clandestine group influencing history from the shadows, sought to use their hidden gifts to regain world control. But their plans were foiled by an unlikely group: Alain Perrot, an eccentric old man and former member of the Council of Satraya; Special Agent Valerie Perrot, his daughter; and Logan Ford, a young painter who discovered he was the son of one of the Chronicles’ original finders, long since murdered in an effort to protect them. Soon, seemingly unrelated global events pull Logan and his allies into another contest with those enemies determined to bring a rising world back down. The earth’s still-recovering energy supply is put at risk. Illnesses spread. Earthquakes without epicenters shatter the land. And the only things holding the world together are the Chronicles, connected to a series of scattered, hidden mirrors around the globe. With T.R. Williams’s trademark excitement, mystery, magic, and deep wisdom, the second book in the Rising World trilogy ensures that you will never look at your reflection the same way again.
Beginnings, judgments and covenants teach us about a loving God. Were we created or did we evolve? Was there a worldwide flood? Are we the chosen people of God? Did people really live for hundreds of years way back when? How big was the ark? Was there really a Garden of Eden? Did Adam and Eve have daughters? Is creation, intelligent design or evolution correct? Do we know when everything came into existence? What does Genesis have to do with me? Why am I here? Who is this Creator God? Does the Voice of God speak to me? Stephen Mayer has been a Bible teacher for three decades and a high school Bible, science and history teacher within Christian schools for many of those years. He has a B.A. from Lipscomb (Nashville), an M.A. from Regent (Virginia Beach), and is in the final years of his PhD in Science Education with Curtin University (Perth, Australia). In this book, he cross-references and overlaps several chapters that are often misunderstood, misinterpreted, or blatantly denied, demonstrating the reliability of the Bible. His desire is to prove to his readers that the Bible is absolutely foundational to their faith, and is the authoritative Word of God. His counsel for those seeking Absolute Truth among the many voices of the world: Dig deeper into the Word of God for There is the Voice of God.
This volume introduces the hermeneutical approach and ecojustice principles developed by the Earth Bible project team. Following this approach, biblical scholars illustrate how a reading of the biblical text from the perspective of Earth yields fresh insights. Though the text may seem anthropocentric, these studies are able to retrieve evidence of the living voice and intrinsic value of Earth. It is an approach that can be harmonized with other recognized critical approaches to the Bible, from historical criticism to ecofeminist criticism. The texts chosen are from many parts of the Bible (Psalms, Prophets, Gospels, Romans, Revelation) and the intertestamental literature (Tobit and Wisdom of Solomon).
What has hermeneutics to do with ecology? What texts, if any, come to mind when you consider what the scriptures might say about environmental ethics? To help readers think critically and clearly about the Bibles relation to modern environmental issues, this volume expands the horizons of biblical interpretation to introduce ecological hermeneutics, moving beyond a simple discussion about Earth and its constituents as topics to a reading of the text from the perspective of Earth. In these groundbreaking essays, sixteen scholars seek ways to identify with Earth as they read and retrieve the role or voice of Earth, a voice previously unnoticed or suppressed within the biblical text and its interpretation. This study enriches eco-theology with eco-exegesis, a radical and timely dialogue between ecology and hermeneutics. The contributors are Vicky Balabanski, Laurie Braaten , Norman Habel, Theodore Hiebert, Cameron Howard, Melissa Tubbs Loya, Hilary Marlow, Susan Miller, Raymond Person, Alice Sinnott, Kristin Swenson, Sigve Tonstad, Peter Trudinger, Marie Turner, Elaine Wainwright, and Arthur Walker-Jones.

Best Books