This book offers a fresh understanding of the substance behind the rhetoric of English Renaissance monarchy. Propaganda is identified as a key factor in the intensification of the English state. The Tudor royal image is pursued in all its forms: in print and prayer, in iconography andarchitecture. The monarchy surrounded itself with the trappings of majesty at court, but in the shires it relied on different strategies of persuasion to uphold its authority. The Reformation placed the provincial pulpit at the disposal of the crown, and the church became the main conduit of royalpropaganda. Sermons taught the duty of obedience, and parish prayer was redirected from local saints towards the sovereign as the symbolic core of the nation.Dr Cooper examines the relationship between the Tudor monarchy and its subjects in Cornwall and Devon, and the complex interaction between local and national political culture. These were years of social and religious upheaval, during which the western peninsula witnessed three major rebellions,and many more riots and affrays. A vibrant popular religion was devastated by the Protestant Reformation, and foreign invasion was a frequent threat. Cornwall remained recognizably different from England in its ancient language and traditions. Yet in the midst of all this, popular allegiance tomonarchy and nation survived and prospered. The Tudors were mourned and celebrated in towns and parish churches. Loyalty was fostered by the Duchy of Cornwall and the stannaries. Regional difference, far from undermining the power of the crown, was fundamental to its success in the westcountry.This is a study of government at the dangerous edges of Tudor England, and a testament to the unifying power of propaganda.
Die Überzeugung, von Gott erwählt zu sein, prägte die englisch-britische Geschichte nachhaltig. Doch wann und wie kam es dazu, dass sich diese Vorstellung so eng mit der englischen Identität verband? Boris Queckbörner analysiert den ideengeschichtlichen Entwicklungsprozess der englischen Reformation zwischen den Herrschaftszeiten Heinrichs VIII. und Elisabeths I. Der alttestamentliche Exodus fungierte hierbei als Orientierungswissen und argumentativer Bezugspunkt, um reformatorisches Gedankengut zu vermitteln. Vor allem ermöglichte das biblische Narrativ es, bestehende Wissensbestände und alte Gewissheiten zu diskursivieren, neu zu ordnen und darüber letztlich Innovationen zu schaffen und zu legitimieren. Die gesellschaftliche Verfestigung des Glaubens an die göttliche Erwählung Englands muss dabei als ein wesentliches Resultat dieser kontinuierlichen Verargumentierung angesehen werden.
This is a major study of the 1549 rebellions, the largest and most important risings in Tudor England. Based upon extensive archival evidence, the book sheds fresh light on the causes, course and long-term consequences of the insurrections. Andy Wood focuses on key themes in the social history of politics, concerning the end of medieval popular rebellion; the Reformation and popular politics; popular political language; early modern state formation; speech, silence and social relations; and social memory and the historical representation of the rebellions. He examines the long-term significance of the rebellions for the development of English society, arguing that the rebellions represent an important moment of discontinuity between the late medieval and the early modern periods. This compelling history of Tudor politics from the bottom up will be essential reading for late medieval and early modern historians as well as early modern literary critics.
The short reign of Edward VI was a turbulent one, even by Tudor standards. The kingdom was threatened by widespread unrest, riots, and rebellions among the common people. In this study, Beer looks at these dramatic events from the viewpoint of the rebellious commoners. Above the clamor of the streets and countryside runs the intricate story of the interaction and often confusing relations among the commoners, the gentry, and the king's councillors in London.
This fascinating collection of primary source documents furnishes the accounts—in their own words—of those who initiated, advanced, or lived through the Reformation. • Supports common core standards for English language arts/history and social studies by promoting critical thinking • Covers the people and events of the period in Germany, France, Italy, the British Isles, and elsewhere in Europe • Defines unfamiliar terms alongside of the documents that contain them • Features a chronology listing important dates and events pertaining to the Protestant Reformation
Edward VI was the son of Henry VIII and his second wife, Jane Seymour. He ruled for only six years (1547-1553) and died at the age of sixteen. But these were years of fundamental importance in the history of the English state, and in particular of the English church. This new biography reveals for the first time that, despite his youth, Edward had a significant personal impact. Jennifer Loach draws a fresh portrait of the boy king as a highly precocious, well educated, intellectually confident, and remarkably decisive youth, with clear views on the future of the English church. Loach also offers a new understanding of Edward’s health, arguing that the cause of his death was a severe infection of the lungs rather than tuberculosis, the commonly accepted diagnosis. The author views Edward not as a sickly child but as a healthy and vigorous boy, devoted to hunting and tournaments like any young aristocrat of the day. This book tells the story of the monarch and of his time. It supplies the dramatic context in which the short reign of Edward VI was played out—the momentous religious changes, factional fights, and popular risings. And it offers vivid details on Edward’s increasing absorption in politics, his consciousness of his role as supreme head of the English church, his determination to lay the foundation for a Protestant regime, and how his failure in this ambition brought England to the brink of civil war.
The monarchs of the Tudor period are among some of the most well-known figures in British history. John Guy presents a compelling and fascinating exploration of the Tudors in the new edition of this Very Short Introduction. Looking at all aspects of the period, from beginning to end, he considers Tudor politics, religion, and economics, as well as issues relating to gender and minority rule, and the art, architecture, and social and material culture of the time. Introducing all of the key Tudor monarchs, Guy considers the impact the Tudor period had not only at the time, but also the historical legacy it left behind. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
This title provides an account of the Victorian perception of the religious dissenters persecuted by Mary I compared with the real response to religious change in Tudor England.
"The management of image in the service of power is a familiar tool of twenty-first century politics. Here a leading historian reveals how, from even before the Reformation, the Tudors sought to sustain and enhance their authority by representing themselves to their people through the media of building, print, art, material culture and speech. Deploying what we might now describe as 'spin, Tudor rulers worked actively as patrons and popularisers to present themselves to the best advantage." "This first sustained analysis of the verbal and visual representations of Tudor power embraces art history, literary studies and the history of consumption and material culture. It reflects years of study of the texts, pictures, modes and forms of representation which circulated images of authority to a public increasingly eager to acquire them." --Book Jacket.
West Britons provides a fresh interpretation of the bloodiest, most devastating years in Cornwall's history and a wholly new perspective on the history of the far South West of Britain. The book explores the unprecedented series of rebellions which took place in Cornwall between 1497 and 1648, traces the connections which existed between those revolts and the contemporary Cornish perception of themselves as a separate 'people', and argues that Cornish history must be viewed within a 'British', rather than a purely English context. West Britons will be required reading for all those who are engaged in the contemporary political and historical debate over 'Britishness'. The book also includes transcriptions of a number of previously unpublished documents, useful to teachers and their students, and a list of some 300 Cornish Royalist officers, of special interest to Civil War enthusiasts and genealogists.
The Tudor age was a tumultuous one ¿ a time of the Reformation, conspiracies, uprisings and rebellions. The Tudor Rebellions gives a chronological run-down of the major rebellions and throws light on some of the main themes of Tudor history, including the dynasty¿s attempt to bring the north and west under the control of the capital, the progress of the English Reformation and the impact of inflation, taxation and enclosure on society.
Unlock your full potential with this revision guide which focuses on the key content and skills you need to know. My Revision Notes OCR A2 History: Rebellion and Disorder under the Tudors 1485-1603 closely combines the content of this OCR A2 unit with revision activities and advice on exam technique. In addition each section has a model answer with exam tips for you to analyse and better understand what is required in the exam. - Makes revision of the content manageable by condensing topics into easy-to-revise chunks. - Encourages active revision by closely combining content with a variety of different activities. - Helps improve exam technique through tailor-made activities and plenty of guidance on how to answer questions.
The seventh volume in the acclaimed paperback series . . . the only county series that can legitimately claim to represent the past and present of a nation. Contributions by Catherine Brace, Brian Elvins, Michael Everson, Jim Hall, John Hurst, Patrick Laviolette, Jon Mills, William A. Morris, Philip Payton, Ronald Perry, Sharron P. Schwartz, Garry Tregidga and Nicholas Williams

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