Ein verheerender Bombenanschlag des IS im Pariser Marais-Viertel zwingt Gabriel Allon ein letztes Mal ins Feld: Anstatt seinen Posten als Chef des israelischen Geheimdienstes anzutreten, hilft der legendäre Agent den französischen Behörden, den Drahtzieher des blutigen Terroraktes zu suchen. Außer dessen Namen - Saladin - weiß man nichts über ihn. Allon sieht die einzige Möglichkeit an ihn heranzukommen darin, jemanden in das Terrornetzwerk des IS einzuschleusen. Eine junge Ärztin scheint die perfekte Rekrutin für das gefährliche Unterfangen zu sein ... "‚Die Attentäterin‘ zeigt Daniel Silva in gewohnter Form. 80 kurze Kapitel voll überraschender Wendungen und rasanter Action bieten spannende Lektüre von der ersten bis zur letzten Seite." dpa "Realistischer und aktueller geht es nicht." Landeszeitung für die Lüneburger Heide "Routiniert entwickelt der Bestsellerautor realistische Figuren, deren radikale Denkmuster er glaubhaft wie hautnah vermitteln kann, und steigert die Spannung bis zum dramatischen Finale. Da bleibt nur zu hoffen, dass seine fiktionale Terrorszenarien niemals Realität werden und verdammt gute Unterhaltungsliteratur bleiben." Kulturnews "Mich hat sowohl das Personal überzeugt als auch die Handlung. Alle Figuren sind für mich stimmig, sie interagieren überzeugend und haben mich von Anfang an in ihren Bann gezogen. Genauso die Handlung, die zwar mutig ist, aber ich kann mir trotzdem vorstellen, dass sie (fast) genau so real passieren kann." Krimimimi "Von den tatsächlichen Ereignissen beim Schreiben überholt, zeigt der US-Amerikaner einmal mehr, wie nahe er in seinen Büchern der Wirklichkeit kommt. Packend spiegelt ‚Die Attentäterin‘ die komplexen Welten von Geheimdiensten, Spionen und einem global agierenden Terrornetzwerk wider und zeichnet sich dabei neben fundierter Recherche durch facettenreiche Figuren aus, die die Motive aller Charaktere nachvollziehbar machen." Krimi-Tipp "Personen, Dialoge und Handlungen wirken komplett authentisch - und das ist man von Daniel Silva so gewohnt. Auf manchen Büchern steht nur Thriller drauf - hier ist Spannung auch wirklich drin." Krimi-Couch.de "Daniel Silva bestätigt seinen Ruf als einer der führenden Autoren von Agententhrillern. Die Seiten blättern sich, wie von selbst." - New York Journal of Books "Ein literarisches Pulverfass” - The Huffington Post
The World of Dark Shadows is science fiction and fantasy with a touch of horror at its best. It is an epic adventure of three friends, Jean de Leon, Mary Williams, and Tim Morgan, bound by their friendship and love for each other. They are guided by a symbiotic transformational Orb named Gabriel. Gabriel is from Zen a Psi-Force world in space without time. Together they journey through inter-dimensional space-time and alternate realities to the evil and forbidden, World of Dark Shadows, in a heroic attempt to obtain the, Ancient Book of Signs and Symbols and rescue their loved ones. Together the four friends struggle against dark forces, powers and principalities, in a dangerous struggle against all odds to rescue those they love from an insidious evil entity whose only purpose for existence is to bring forth death, destruction and possession of their eternal souls and conquest of their world. The prophecy said, three children wise beyond their ages with a transformational Orb, would challenge Lucifer's dominion to save all that they love and believe in. What the prophecy did not say was whether or not they would succeed.
James Sidbury's Ploughshares into Swords places the enslaved population of Virginia squarely within the emerging Atlantic world culture--of the market economy, of urban culture, of Virginia's rapidly changing religious culture. Sidbury stresses the way black Virginians appropriated white cultural forms, transformed their meaning, and in the process created symbols of black liberation and a culture that had autonomous features even though it drew from the larger culture. His skillfull interweaving of these two separate strands of argument provides rare insights into the entire process of identity formation and creolization.
For two thousand years Carpathian twins Gabriel and Lucian were vampire hunters. But then, Lucian turned vampire, forcing Gabriel to hunt him. Lucian and Gabriel battled each other for centuries until two hundred years ago, when Gabriel sacrificed his freedom, trapping Lucian and himself in the earth of a Parisian cemetery. Now, modern construction work within the cemetery has disturbed their resting place and Gabriel and his dark brother Lucian are raised from the rubble. Weakened and in desperate need of blood, Gabriel fears he will lose his own soul before he can restore his strength. Fate is on his side when Francesca, a uniquely gifted healer, comes to his aid. Gabriel instantly recognises that she is his lifemate, and must convince Francesca before it is too late: Lucian is on their trail, and will let nothing stand in the way of his eternal conflict with his brother.
Gabriel's Rebellion tells the dramatic story of what was perhaps the most extensive slave conspiracy in the history of the American South. Douglas Egerton illuminates the complex motivations that underlay two related Virginia slave revolts: the first, in 1800, led by the slave known as Gabriel; and the second, called the 'Easter Plot,' instigated in 1802 by one of his followers. Although Gabriel has frequently been portrayed as a messianic, Samson-like figure, Egerton shows that he was a literate and highly skilled blacksmith whose primary goal was to destroy the economic hegemony of the 'merchants,' the only whites he ever identified as his enemies. According to Egerton, the social, political, and economic disorder of the Revolutionary era weakened some of the harsh controls that held slavery in place during colonial times. Emboldened by these conditions, a small number of literate slaves--most of them highly skilled artisans--planned an armed insurrection aimed at destroying slavery in Virginia. The intricate scheme failed, as did the Easter Plot that stemmed from it, and Gabriel and many of his followers were hanged. By placing the revolts within the broader context of the volatile political currents of the day, Egerton challenges the conventional understanding of race, class, and politics in the early days of the American republic.
Dear Gabriel is an attempt to look into the mind of God. What does God think about what is going on in his world? Ultimately, what is going to happen? How big is our God in grace and justice? The author lays open his mind and heart to what he truly believes is at the heart and mind of God. Is it possible that we will be forgiven? Is it possible that punishment and judgment come as the consequences of our own doing?
Gabriel's father, a washed-up rock musician, has been chucked out of the house. His mother works nights in a pub and sleeps days. Navigating his way through the shattered world of his parents' generation, Gabriel dreams of being an artist. He finds solace and guidance through a mysterious connection to his deceased twin brother, Archie, and his own knack for producing real objects simply by drawing them. A chance visit with mega-millionaire rock star Lester Jones, his father's former band mate, provides Gabriel with the means to heal the rift within his family. Kureishi portrays Gabriel's naïve hope and artistic aspirations with the same insight and searing honesty that he brought to the Indian-Anglo experience in The Buddha of Suburbia and to infidelity in Intimacy. Gabriel's Gift is a humorous and tender meditation on failure, redemption, the nature of talent, the power of imagination -- and a generation that never wanted to grow up, seen through the eyes of their children.
Since its rediscovery a decade ago, the Hazon Gabriel or Gabriel Revelation, a Hebrew inscription of the first century B.C.E., has attracted considerable attention. The inscription, of which about 87 lines are preserved, written in black ink on a slab of gray limestone, has been compared to the Dead Sea Scrolls. This book makes accessible in one place all existing editions of the Hazon Gabriel together with annotated English translations and offers initial interpretations of the text as a whole, its language, and its most prominent motifs. The volume, originating from a 2009 conference at Rice University, compares the Gabriel Revelation to other literature of the time—the book of Daniel, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the New Testament in particular—to determine its place in early Judaism. The contributors are David Jeselsohn, Ada Yardeni and Binyamin Elizur, Elisha Qimron and Alexey (Eliyahu) Yuditsky, Israel Knohl, Gary A. Rendsburg, Adela Yarbro Collins, John J. Collins, Matthias Henze, Kelley Coblentz Bautch, Daewoong Kim, and David Capes.
Novels five through eight of the Gabriel Allon series from #1 New York Times bestselling author Daniel Silva. Prince of Fire Gabriel Allon is back in Venice, when a terrible explosion in Rome leads to a disturbing personal revelation: the existence of a dossier in terrorist hands that strips away his secrets and lays bare his history… The Messenger Gabriel Allon is about to face the greatest challenge of his life. An al-Qaeda suspect is killed in London, and photographs are found on his computer—photographs that lead Israeli intelligence to suspect that al-Qaeda is planning an attack aimed straight at the heart of the Vatican. The Secret Servant A terrorist plot in London leads Israeli spy Gabriel Allon on a desperate search for a kidnapped woman, in a race against time that will compromise Allon’s own conscience—and life... Moscow Rules The death of a journalist leads Israeli spy Gabriel Allon to Russia, where he finds that, in terms of spycraft, even he has something to learn if he wants to prevent a former KGB colonel from delivering Russia's most sophisticated weapons to al-Qaeda. Praise for the #1 New York Times bestselling author Daniel Silva and the Gabriel Allon series “Those in the know are calling him the new John Le Carré. Those who are reading him can't put him down."—Chicago Sun-Times "The enigmatic Gabriel Allon remains one of the most intriguing heroes of any thriller series."—The Philadelphia Inquirer "A writer who brings new life to the international thriller."—Newsday "Allon is Israel’s Jack Bauer…Thrill factor:*****."—USA Today "Nobody handles this kind of intrigue as well Silva. He gives Gabriel and the rest of his team the kind of depth seen only in spy novels by Robert Ludlum and Tom Clancy."—Richmond Times Dispatch "A terrific thriller…one of the best-drawn fictional assassins since The Day of the Jackal."—The San Francisco Examiner “Silva builds tension with breathtaking double and triple turns of plot.”—People
From the pioneering work of Oscar Micheaux and Wallace Thurman to the Hollywood success of Spike Lee, Black American filmmakers have played a remarkable role in the development of the American film, both independent and mainstream. In this volume, the work of early Black filmmakers is given serious attention for the first time. Essays consider what a Black film tradition might be, the relation between Black American filmmakers and filmmakers from the diaspora, the nature of Black film aesthetics, the artist's place within the community, and the representation of a Black imaginary. The collection also discusses Black sexuality on screen, and the role of Black women in independent cinema and as spectators; also, those Black directors who worked for Hollywood and whose films are simplistically dismissed as sell-outs, versus those "crossover" filmmakers whose achievements entail a surreptitious infiltration of the studios.--From publisher description.
Expanded to include the latest discoveries in prehistoric art as well as the most recent developments in non-Western and modern art, this is an up-to-date and wide ranging history of art.
Con artist Gabriel Black just got busted. By a babe. Drool-worthy (and clearly sneaky) FBI agent Danita Cruz is forcing Gabriel to choose between hard time and scamming his own family for an undercover sting. Now he has to present Danita to his family as his girlfriend. And it's the perfect opportunity to get wickedly even with her…. But Danita has some tricks of her own, and Gabriel's control begins slipping away as raw sexual energy takes over. Their sham relationship starts feeling a lot like…well, the real deal. The Big Question is, will overwhelming desire be enough to make a liar go legit?
This book tells the compelling story of postemancipation Colombia, from the liberation of the slaves in the 1850s through the country's first general labor strikes in the 1910s. As Jason McGraw demonstrates, ending slavery fostered a new sense of citizenship, one shaped both by a model of universal rights and by the particular freedom struggles of African-descended people. Colombia's Caribbean coast was at the center of these transformations, in which women and men of color, the region's majority population, increasingly asserted the freedom to control their working conditions, fight in civil wars, and express their religious beliefs. The history of Afro-Colombians as principal social actors after emancipation, McGraw argues, opens up a new view on the practice and meaning of citizenship. Crucial to this conception of citizenship was the right of recognition. Indeed, attempts to deny the role of people of color in the republic occurred at key turning points exactly because they demanded public recognition as citizens. In connecting Afro-Colombians to national development, The Work of Recognition also places the story within the broader contexts of Latin American popular politics, culture, and the African diaspora.
Death or Hell?Three weeks after leaving Rhyn, Katie learns the Immortals have no intention of letting her go despite her deal with their leader. Rhyn discovers he can only protect her if he accepts his place among the Immortals. However, doing so may cost him the only thing that matters. Meanwhile, demons are closing in, and Death orders Katie killed. Death's assassin and the demons pursue them, and Katie will have to choose between Death or Hell to save Rhyn from both.
With the publication of his two early works, Black Theology & Black Power (1969) and A Black Theology of Liberation (1970), James Cone emerged as one of the most creative and provocative theological voices in North America. These books, which offered a searing indictment of white theology and society, introduced a radical reappraisal of the Christian message for our time. Combining the visions of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone radically reappraised Christianity from the perspective of the oppressed black community in North America. Forty years later, his work retains its original power, enhanced now by reflections on the evolution of his own thinking and of black theology and on the needs of the present moment.
This is a fictional account and a glimpse of future events from North Korea to Southern Oregon connecting the dots in making the world and Southern Oregon a better place to live.
Gathers writings on Black nationalism from Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, and Alexander Crummell
"When the legend becomes fact, print the legend." This line comes from director John Ford's film, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, but it also serves as an epigram for the life of the legendary filmmaker. Through a career that spanned decades and included work on dozens of films -- among them such American masterpieces as The Searchers, The Grapes of Wrath, The Quiet Man, Stagecoach, and How Green Was My Valley -- John Ford managed to leave as his legacy a body of work that few filmmakers will ever equal. Yet as bold as the stamp of his personality was on each film, there was at the same time a marked reticence when it came to revealing anything personal. Basically shy, and intensely private, he was known to enjoy making up stories about himself, some of them based loosely on fact but many of them pure fabrications. Ford preferred instead to let his films speak for him, and the message was always masculine, determined, romantic, yes, but never soft -- and always, always totally "American." If there were other aspects to his personality, moods and subtleties that weren't reflected on the screen, then no one really needed to know. Indeed, what mattered to Ford was always what was up there on the screen. And if it varied from reality, what did it matter? When you are creating legend, fact becomes a secondary matter. Now, in this definitive look at the life and career of one of America's true cinematic giants, noted biographer and critic Scott Eyman, working with the full participation of the Ford estate, has managed to document and delineate both aspects of John Ford's life -- the human being and the legend. Going well beyond the legend, Eyman has explored the many influences that were brought to play on this remarkable and complex man, and the result is a rich and involving story of a great film director and of the world in which he lived, as well as the world of Hollywood legend that he helped to shape. Drawing on more than a hundred interviews and research on three continents, Scott Eyman explains how a saloon-keeper's son from Maine helped to shape America's vision of itself, and how a man with only a high school education came to create a monumental body of work, including films that earned him six Academy Awards -- more than any filmmaker before or since. He also reveals the truth of Ford's turbulent relationship with actress Katharine Hepburn, recounts his stand for freedom of speech during the McCarthy witch-hunt -- including a confrontation with archconservative Cecil B. DeMille -- and discusses his disfiguring alcoholism as well as the heroism he displayed during World War II. Brilliant, stubborn, witty, rebellious, irascible, and contradictory, John Ford remains one of the enduring giants in what is arguably America's greatest contribution to art -- the Hollywood movie. In Print the Legend, Scott Eyman has managed at last to separate fact from legend in writing about this remarkable man, producing what will remain the definitive biography of this film giant.
The first popular history of the former American slaves who founded, ruled, and lost Africa's first republic In 1820, a group of about eighty African Americans reversed the course of history and sailed back to Africa, to a place they would name after liberty itself. They went under the banner of the American Colonization Society, a white philanthropic organization with a dual agenda: to rid America of its blacks, and to convert Africans to Christianity. The settlers staked out a beachhead; their numbers grew as more boats arrived; and after breaking free from their white overseers, they founded Liberia—Africa's first black republic—in 1847. James Ciment's Another America is the first full account of this dramatic experiment. With empathy and a sharp eye for human foibles, Ciment reveals that the Americo-Liberians struggled to live up to their high ideals. They wrote a stirring Declaration of Independence but re-created the social order of antebellum Dixie, with themselves as the master caste. Building plantations, holding elegant soirees, and exploiting and even helping enslave the native Liberians, the persecuted became the persecutors—until a lowly native sergeant murdered their president in 1980, ending 133 years of Americo rule. The rich cast of characters in Another America rivals that of any novel. We encounter Marcus Garvey, who coaxed his followers toward Liberia in the 1920s, and the rubber king Harvey Firestone, who built his empire on the backs of native Liberians. Among the Americoes themselves, we meet the brilliant intellectual Edward Blyden, one of the first black nationalists; the Baltimore-born explorer Benjamin Anderson, seeking a legendary city of gold in the Liberian hinterland; and President William Tubman, a descendant of Georgia slaves, whose economic policies brought Cadillacs to the streets of Monrovia, the Liberian capital. And then there are the natives, men like Joseph Samson, who was adopted by a prominent Americo family and later presided over the execution of his foster father during the 1980 coup. In making Liberia, the Americoes transplanted the virtues and vices of their country of birth. The inspiring and troubled history they created is, to a remarkable degree, the mirror image of our own.
When Gabriel Lynch moves with his mother and brother from a brownstone in Baltimore to a dirt-floor hovel on a homestead in Kansas, he is not pleased. He does not dislike his new stepfather, a former slave, but he has no desire to submit to a life of drudgery and toil on the untamed prairie. So he joins up with a motley crew headed for Texas only to be sucked into an ever-westward wandering replete with a mindless violence he can neither abet nor avoid–a terrifying trek he penitently fears may never allow for a safe return. David Anthony Durham is a genuine talent bent on devastating originality and Gabriel’s Story is as formidable a debut as we have witnessed. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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