The theoretical frameworks political sociologists use to understand, describe and predict political behaviour have evolved in response to empirical challenges and interdisciplinary influences. This work should prompt readers to evaluate theoretical assumptions and expand their thinking.
This book traces the disciplinary development of political sociology and the transdisciplinary research into the overlapping issues involving politics and society. The contributions cover overviews of the historical, methodological, and theoretical development of this academic discipline. Successes, as well as failures, in past unexplored areas, and salient issues in ongoing research, are also highlighted. Contributions include: Introduction: Taking Stock of Political Sociology * Political Culture at a Crossroads? * Parties, Interest Groups and Social Movements: Shall Change be Midwife to Truth? * Socio-Political Inequalities: Elites, Classes and Democracy * Contemporary Approaches to the Study of the State * and Political Sociology: Old Concerns and New Directions.
Globalization and Global History argues that globalization is not an exotic and new phenomenon. Instead it emphasizes that globalization is something that has been with us as long as there have been people who are both interdependent and aware of that fact. Studying globalization from the vantage point of long-term global history permits theoretical and empirical investigation, allowing the authors collected to assess the extent of ongoing transformations and to compare them to earlier iterations. With this historical advantage, the extent of ongoing changes - which previously appeared unprecedented - can be contrasted to similar episodes in the past. The book is divided into three sections. The first focuses on how globalization has been written about from a historical perspective. The second part advances three different takes on how best to view globalization from a very long-term stance. The final section continues this interpretative thread by examining more narrow aspects of globalization processes, ranging from incorporation processes to systemic disruptions.
Political sociology continues to be the most significant place for the study of the relationship between society and politics. The study of political participation has always formed an important part of this research. This volume presents a diverse collection of works dedicated to assessing the research and future directions in the field.
Focuses on one of the central themes in political sociology: the relationship between political power and the policy formation process. This work examines the exercise of power in two arenas: the interlocking networks among policy-planning organizations, and the effects of PACs on the voting behavior of elected officials in Canada and the US.
As one-half of the latest edition of Immanuel Wallerstein's Political Economy of the World-System series, this collection offers cutting-edge theoretical directions to explain the structural crises of the 21st-century world- system. Contributors argue that the capitalist world system has reached a critical bifurcation point, a short period which will be characterized by a sudden shift in the long-term structural forces that have created and sustained the world as we know it. Writers challenge conventional thinking about the most significant structural crises that face the 21st-century world-system, including terrorism, debt, the growth of megacities as global actors, the emergence of a powerful transnational capitalist class, and the world ecological crisis.
CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.
World Poverty provides a general summary of world poverty at the beginning of the 21st century, then an introduction to modern world system theory and its attempts to explain world poverty and inequality. Separate chapters contain an overview of poverty in Africa, Latin America, and then Asia. Remaining chapters offer explanations for why some countries in the world (mostly in Asia) have become richer and reduced the ranks of their poor through ties with the global economy while others have not. Kerbo provides extensive evidence for why the nature of the state in developing countries is the most important factor in stagnation or even economic development with poverty reduction. But, in contrast to previous research and new statements by the World Bank, he has created a model attempting to explain why and how some countries have “good governance” and others do not. The book concludes with what we now know about world poverty and what does and does not work to reduce it.
By bringing into dialogue modern systems theory and international relations, this text provides theoretically innovative and empirically rich perspectives on conflicts in world society. This collection contrasts Niklas Luhmann’s theory of world society in modern systems theory with more classical approaches to the study of conflicts, offering a fresh perspective on territorial conflicts in international relations. It includes chapters on key issues such as: conflicts and human rights conflicts in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa war and violence Greek-Turkish relations conflict theory the role of states in world societal conflicts legal territorial disputes in Australia hegemony and conflict in global law conflict management after 9/11. While all contributions draw from the theory of world society in modern systems theory, the authors offer rich multi-disciplinary perspectives which bring in concepts from international relations, peace and conflict studies, sociology, law and philosophy. Territorial Conflicts in World Society will appeal to international relations specialists, peace and conflict researchers and sociologists.
If the study of politics is to be rewarding both intellectually and practically it must. by definition. concern itself with the great issues which arise in the real world and with the fundamental arguments which occur about their nature and the possible solutions to them. Abstract political philosophy which is not informed by the experi ence of practice will become sterile. A study of constitutions and the machinery of government can become dry-as-dust and hence boring unless the underlying principles are analysed and grasped. But theo ries of political change divorced from an understanding of consti tutions and institutions will degenerate into mere phrase-mongering. Attempts to apply the techniques of the natural sciences to politics will lead to model building for its own sake and thence to arid and barren intellectualism unless it is understood that it is impossible to quantify the intangible. Indeed. anyone-sided approach to politics and consequent failure to grasp the essential wholeness of the sub ject is bound to end in disaster. The study of politics is a study of changing human relationships in dynamic societies. Thus it involves. since the present and hence the future are shaped in part by the past. an appreciation of history.
This concise text, covers both classical and contemporary social thought. It traces the major schools of thought over the past 150 years as they appear and reappear in different chapters and looks at important new voices in social theory. The treatment of individual theories and theorists is balanced with the development of key themes and ideas about social life.
It is common to hear that we live in unique, turbulent and crisis-ridden times and this turbulence, transformation and crisis are said to be deeply significant - perhaps threatening - for the human sciences. Responding to such claims, this book provides an accessible engagement with pressing contemporary topics, such as violence, social movements, equality, identity and democracy. Foregrounding the imagination of possibilities (utopia), the mapping of the present (theory), and the transformation of the world-system (historical and global questions), the book surveys central issues and paradigms in contemproary political sociology, urging a recommitment to certain concepts and traditions for guidance in thinking and acting in the world.
Through critical sociological appraisals of literary theory, research and pedagogy, this volume presents challenges to dominant psychological approaches in reading research and to mainstream discourses about reading and writing pedagogy. Bringing together the recent work of literacy researchers in Australia, Europe and North America, the volume offers novel critiques and theorizations from within political economy, neomarxist and critical theory, ethnomethodology, interactive sociolinguistics, poststructuralism and postmodernism. The volume is arranged in four sections; The Politics of Pedagogy; Reading in Classrooms; Reconstructing Theory; Reading the Social. This collection is provocative and innovative, offering clear alternatives for conceptualizing literacy, for conducting literacy research, and for reconstructing the discourses and practices of reading and writing in schools. The volume is addressed to a broad audience of researchers, educators and students.
Biomedicine in the Twentieth Century: Practices, Policies, and Politics is a testimony to the growing interest of scholars in the development of the biomedical sciences in the twentieth century and to the number of historians, social scientists and health policy analysts now working on the subject. The book is comprised of essays by noted historians and social scientists that offer insights on a range of subjects that should be a significant stimulus for further historical investigation. It details the NIH’s practices, policies and politics on a variety of fronts, including the development of the intramural program, the National Institute of Mental Health and mental health policy, the politics and funding of heart transplantation and the initial focus of the National Cancer Institute. Comparisons can be made with the development of other American and British institutions involved in medical research, such as the Rockefeller Institute and the Medical Research Council. Discussions of the larger scientific and social context of United States’ federal support for research, the role of lay institutions in federal funding of virus research, the consequences of technology transfer and patenting, the effects of vaccine and drug development and the environment of research discoveries all offer new insights and suggest questions for further exploration.
The revised and expanded edition of this popular text incorporates the latest thinkig in public administration and non-profit management. It integrates both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research, and includes new chapters and improved coverage that bring it thoroughly up to date.
When the Coalition Government came to power in 2010 in claimed it would deliver not just austerity, as necessary as that apparently was, but also fairness. This volume subjects this pledge to critical interrogation by exposing the interests behind the policy programme pursued and their damaging effects on class inequalities. Situated within a recognition of the longer-term rise of neoliberal politics, reflections on the status of sociology as a source of critique and current debates over the relationship between the cultural and economic dimensions of social class, the contributors cover an impressively wide range of relevant topics, from education, family policy and community to crime and consumption, shedding new light on the experience of domination in the early 21st Century.

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