Updated and expanded edition of the foundational text of women of color feminism. Originally released in 1981, This Bridge Called My Back is a testimony to women of color feminism as it emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Through personal essays, criticism, interviews, testimonials, poetry, and visual art, the collection explores, as coeditor Cherríe Moraga writes, “the complex confluence of identities—race, class, gender, and sexuality—systemic to women of color oppression and liberation.” Reissued here, nearly thirty-five years after its inception, the fourth edition contains an extensive new introduction by Moraga, along with a previously unpublished statement by Gloria Anzaldúa. The new edition also includes visual artists whose work was produced during the same period as Bridge, including Betye Saar, Ana Mendieta, and Yolanda López, as well as current contributor biographies. Bridge continues to reflect an evolving definition of feminism, one that can effectively adapt to, and help inform an understanding of the changing economic and social conditions of women of color in the United States and throughout the world. “Immense is my admiration for the ongoing dialogue and discourse on feminism, Indigenous feminism, the defining discussions in women of color movements and the broader movement. I have loved this book for thirty years, and am so pleased we have returned with our stories, words, and attributes to the growing and resilient movement.” — Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe), Executive Director, Honor the Earth Praise for the Third Edition “This Bridge Called My Back … dispels all doubt about the power of a single text to radically transform the terrain of our theory and practice. Twenty years after its publication, we can now see how it helped to untether the production of knowledge from its disciplinary anchors—and not only in the field of women’s studies. This Bridge has allowed us to define the promise of research on race, gender, class and sexuality as profoundly linked to collaboration and coalition-building. And perhaps most important, it has offered us strategies for transformative political practice that are as valid today as they were two decades ago.” — Angela Davis, University of California, Santa Cruz “This Bridge Called My Back … has served as a significant rallying call for women of color for a generation, and this new edition keeps that call alive at a time when divisions prove ever more stubborn and dangerous. A much-cited text, its influence has been visible and broad both in academia and among activists. We owe much of the sound of our present voices to the brave scholars and feminists whose ideas and ideals crowd its pages.” — Shirley Geok-lin Lim, University of California, Santa Barbara “This book is a manifesto—the 1981 declaration of a new politics ‘US Third World Feminism.’ No great de-colonial writer, from Fanon, Shaarawi, Blackhawk, or Sartre, to Mountain Wolf Woman, de Beauvoir, Saussure, or Newton could have alone proclaimed this ‘politic born of necessity.’ This politic denies no truths: its luminosities drive into and through our bodies. Writers and readers alike become shape-shifters, are invited to enter the shaman/witness state, to invoke power differently. ‘US Third World Feminism’ requires a re-peopling: the creation of planetary citizen-warriors. This book is a guide that directs citizenry shadowed in hate, terror, suffering, disconnection, and pain toward the light of social justice, gender and erotic liberation, peace, and revolutionary love. This Bridge … transits our dreams, and brings them to the real.” — Chela Sandoval, University of California, Santa Barbara
This groundbreaking collection reflects an uncompromised definition of feminism by women of color. 65,000 copies in print.
One of Literary Hub's Most Anticipated Books of 2019 From the celebrated editor of This Bridge Called My Back, Cherríe Moraga charts her own coming-of-age alongside her mother’s decline, and also tells the larger story of the Mexican American diaspora. Native Country of the Heart: A Memoir is, at its core, a mother-daughter story. The mother, Elvira, was hired out as a child, along with her siblings, by their own father to pick cotton in California’s Imperial Valley. The daughter, Cherríe Moraga, is a brilliant, pioneering, queer Latina feminist. The story of these two women, and of their people, is woven together in an intimate memoir of critical reflection and deep personal revelation. As a young woman, Elvira left California to work as a cigarette girl in glamorous late-1920s Tijuana, where an ambiguous relationship with a wealthy white man taught her life lessons about power, sex, and opportunity. As Moraga charts her mother’s journey—from impressionable young girl to battle-tested matriarch to, later on, an old woman suffering under the yoke of Alzheimer’s—she traces her own self-discovery of her gender-queer body and Lesbian identity, as well as her passion for activism and the history of her pueblo. As her mother’s memory fails, Moraga is driven to unearth forgotten remnants of a U.S. Mexican diaspora, its indigenous origins, and an American story of cultural loss. Poetically wrought and filled with insight into intergenerational trauma, Native Country of the Heart is a reckoning with white American history and a piercing love letter from a fearless daughter to the mother she will never lose.
A bold collection of creative pieces and theoretical essays by women of color. New thought and new dialogue: a book that will teach in the most multiple sense of that word: a book that will be of lasting value to many diverse communities of women as well as to students from those communities. The authors explore a full spectrum of present concerns in over seventy pieces that vary from writing by new talents to published pieces by Audre Lorde, Joy Harjo, Norma Alarcon and Trinh T. Minh-ha. "At one level or another, all the work in the collection seeks to find ways to understand and articulate our multiple identities and senses of place???."Making Face/Making Soul" is an exciting collection of dynamic, important writings that all women of color and white feminists will learn from, enjoy, and return to again and again and again."-"Sojourner" .,."the pieces are stunning in what they risk and reveal..."-"The San Francisco Chronicle"
Fight for the human rights of LGBT individuals with strategies from this powerful book! From the intimate horror of domestic violence to the institutionalized heterosexism of marriage laws, this volume takes an unsparing look at the interconnections of prejudice and hate crimes in the lives of LGBT individuals. Bringing together original research and solidly grounded theory, From Hate Crimes to Human Rights: A Tribute to Matthew Shepard also offers fresh strategies so you can work effectively for social change. This moving, thoughtful volume begins with a friend's memoir of the murdered Matthew Shepard; this intimate glimpse is powerful testimony that hate crimes affect individuals, not just symbolic martyrs. From Hate Crimes to Human Rights drags hidden homophobia from the closet and examines it with clean, incisive intelligence. It tackles taboo topics, including: what the Bible really says about homosexuality how minority cultures sometimes foster hatred against the LGBT individuals in their midst why child welfare services don't protect LGBT youth from peer violence how internalized LGBT self-hatred can be expressed as domestic violence Hate crimes do not occur in a cultural vacuum. From Hate Crimes to Human Rights searches out the roots of hatred and suggests ways to eradicate them, drawing on economics, theology, and linguistics as well as sociology, history, and political science. Specific suggestions include: how to use language as a social and cultural change strategy what individuals and universities can do to promote human rights how to make use of the intersection of difference and tolerance to prevent hate crimes why equal treatment for LGBT individuals is a human rights issue, not a special-interest advantage From Hate Crimes to Human Rights provides powerful explanations of the ways hatred generates hate crimes and proposes positive action you can take to validate human rights. A Statement from the Authors One of the premises of this book is that if we want to progress from hate crimes to human rights, we must learn to respect, honor, and celebrate diversity. The chapter authors exemplify a rainbow of ethnicities, sexual orientations, and gender identities. Each of us is committed to advocate for human rights and to work to end hate crime. Toward those ends, the royalties from the sale of this book will go directly to a memorial fund that has been established at Monmouth University in Matthew Shepard's honor. The proceeds from that fund will be used to support students in their preparation for human rights advocacy.
Fleshing the Spirit brings together established and new writers exploring the relationships between the physical body, the spirit and spirituality, and social justice activism. Examining the complex and dynamic connections among these concepts, the writers emphasize the value of “flesh and blood experience” as a site of knowledge. They argue that spirituality—something quite different from institutional religious practice—can heal the mind/body split and set the stage for social change. Spirituality, they argue, is a necessary component of an alternative political agenda focused on equitable social and ecological change. The anthology incorporates different genres of writing—such as poetry, testimonials, critical essays, and historical analysis—and stimulates the reader to engage spirituality in a critical, personal, and creative way. This interdisciplinary work is the first that attempts to theorize the radical interconnection between women of color, spirituality, and social activism. Before transformative political work can be done, the authors say in multiple ways, we must recognize that our spiritual need is a desire to more fully understand our relations with others. Conflict experienced on many levels sometimes severs those relations, separating us from others along racial, class, gender, sexual, national, or other socially constructed lines. Fleshing the Spirit offers a spiritual journey of healing, health, and human revolution. The book’s open invitation to engage in critical dialogue and social activism—with the spirit and spirituality at the forefront—illuminates the way to social change and the ability to live in harmony with life’s universal energies. Contributors Volume Editors Elisa Facio Irene Lara Chapter Authors Angelita Borbón Norma E. Cantú Berenice Dimas C. Alejandra Elenes Alicia Enciso Litschi Oliva M. Espín Maria Figueroa Patrisia Gonzales Inés Hernández- Avila Rosa María Hernández Juárez Cinthya Martinez Lara Medina Felicia Montes Sarahi Nuñez- Mejia Laura E. Pérez Brenda Sendejo Inés Talamantez Michelle Téllez Beatriz Villegas
The 25th volume of the International and Intercultural Communication Annual offers a variety of perspectives on culture, identity, and the formation of personal and political alliances.
Beginning in 1869, when the study of homosexuality can be said to have begun with the establishment of sexology, this Encyclopedia offers accounts of the most important international developments in an area that now occupies a critical place in many fields of academic endeavours. While gays and lesbians have shared many aspects of life, their histories and cultures developed in profoundly different ways. To reflect this crucial fact, the Encyclopedia has been prepared in two separate volumes assuring that both histories receive full, unbiased attention and that a broad range of human experience is covered. Written by some of the most famous names in the field, as well as new researchers this is intended as a reference for students and scholars in all areas of study, as well as the general public.
DIVCollection of essays and poems that address the challenges of being a Chicana, a lesbian, and a feminist in the changing world of the twenty-first century./div
Brauchen Frauen und Männer in Supervision und Coaching Unterschiedliches? Werden Frauen und Männer in der supervisorischen Praxis „gleich“ behandelt? Was bedeutet Genderkompetenz im beraterischen Setting? Diesen und ähnlichen Fragen geht die Autorin nach und räumt mit Vorurteilen und Alltagstheorien gründlich auf. Das Buch leistet einen Beitrag zur differenzierten und theoriegeleiteten Auseinandersetzung mit dem Thema Gender. Mittels einer mehrperspektivischen Herangehensweise beleuchtet die Autorin das Thema Gender aus verschiedenen theoretischen Ansätzen, verknüpft sie mit Forschungsergebnissen, stellt mit Fallvignetten einen Praxisbezug her und vernetzt diese zu einem Integrativen Verständnis von Genderkompetenz in Supervision und Coaching. Für die Praxis wird diese Herangehensweise in einem Fragenset zur Reflexion von Prozessen auf der Genderebene verdeutlicht.
More than twenty years after the ground-breaking anthology This Bridge Called My Back called upon feminists to envision new forms of communities and practices, Gloria E. Anzaldúa and AnaLouise Keating have painstakingly assembled a new collection of over eighty original writings that offers a bold new vision of women-of-color consciousness for the twenty-first century. Written by women and men--both "of color" and "white"--this bridge we call home will challenge readers to rethink existing categories and invent new individual and collective identities.
Feminist Theory Reader is an anthology of classic and contemporary works of feminist theory, organized around the goal of providing both local and global perspectives.
Born in the Río Grande Valley of south Texas, independent scholar and creative writer Gloria Anzaldúa was an internationally acclaimed cultural theorist. As the author of Borderlands / La Frontera: The New Mestiza, Anzaldúa played a major role in shaping contemporary Chicano/a and lesbian/queer theories and identities. As an editor of three anthologies, including the groundbreaking This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, she played an equally vital role in developing an inclusionary, multicultural feminist movement. A versatile author, Anzaldúa published poetry, theoretical essays, short stories, autobiographical narratives, interviews, and children’s books. Her work, which has been included in more than 100 anthologies to date, has helped to transform academic fields including American, Chicano/a, composition, ethnic, literary, and women’s studies. This reader—which provides a representative sample of the poetry, prose, fiction, and experimental autobiographical writing that Anzaldúa produced during her thirty-year career—demonstrates the breadth and philosophical depth of her work. While the reader contains much of Anzaldúa’s published writing (including several pieces now out of print), more than half the material has never before been published. This newly available work offers fresh insights into crucial aspects of Anzaldúa’s life and career, including her upbringing, education, teaching experiences, writing practice and aesthetics, lifelong health struggles, and interest in visual art, as well as her theories of disability, multiculturalism, pedagogy, and spiritual activism. The pieces are arranged chronologically; each one is preceded by a brief introduction. The collection includes a glossary of Anzaldúa’s key terms and concepts, a timeline of her life, primary and secondary bibliographies, and a detailed index.
In this lively narrative, newcomers to women's and gender studies, feminist politics, history, and sociology explore a refreshing take on a subject matter often loaded with assumptions. Feminist theories are viewed through the critical intersections of race, class, sexuality, age, and ability, and are embedded in the experiences of everyday life, allowing Bromley to engage readers in doing theory, in making sense of concepts like "power" and "privilege," and in effecting social change. Using a variety of pedagogical devices, including provocative images, discussion questions, and classroom activities, Feminisms Matter helps readers cultivate a way of thinking critically about their everyday worlds.
Da wir nicht getrennt von der Welt leben und die Welt nicht getrennt von uns existiert, geschieht echte Friedensarbeit im Herzen der Menschen, an jedem Ort und in jedem Augenblick. Denn erst eine friedfertige innere Haltung bereitet den Weg zu einem friedlichen Miteinander. Unsere Verabredung mit dem Leben von Thich Nhat Hanh: im eBook erhältlich!
Still Lifting, Still Climbing is the first volume of its kind to document African American women's activism in the wake of the civil rights movement. Covering grassroots and national movements alike, contributors explore black women's mobilization around such areas as the black nationalist movements, the Million Man March, black feminism, anti-rape movements, mass incarceration, the U.S. Congress, welfare rights, health care, and labor organizing. Detailing the impact of post-1960s African American women's activism, they provide a much-needed update to the historical narrative. Ideal for course use, the volume includes original essays as well as primary source documents such as first-hand accounts of activism and statements of purpose. Each contributor carefully situates their topic within its historical framework, providing an accessible context for those unfamiliar with black women's history, and demonstrating that African American women's political agency does not emerge from a vacuum, but is part of a complex system of institutions, economics, and personal beliefs. This ambitious volume will be an invaluable resource on the state of contemporary African American women's activism.
Here, for the first time, is a collection of women's writings from all over the world, across a span of twenty-six hundred years, which speaks to the ways women have resisted oppression and the methods they have found to gain power over their lives.
Over the past three decades, American higher education has witnessed a shift in demographics that has created a more diverse student body. However, many university campuses remain unsupportive or even hostile to minority faculty and students. This anthology introduces readers to the Difference, Power, and Discrimination (DPD) Program, a fifteen-year-old curricular model at Oregon State University. DPD is concerned with helping students understand the complex dynamics of difference, power, and discrimination and how these dynamics influence institutions, with the goal of empowering students to alleviate oppression and other negative outcomes. Teaching for Change addresses the needs of those who are engaged in diversity training and curricular reforms both in higher education and public schools. It will serve as a useful guide for administrators as well as teaching faculty who are interested in initiating similar programs. Book jacket.
Gender in Applied Communication Contexts explores the intersection and integration of feminist theory as applied to four important areas: organizational communication, health communication, family communication, and instructional communication. This collection of readings links theoretical insights and contributions to pragmatic ways of improving the lives of women and men in a variety of professional and personal situations. Gender in Applied Communication Contexts is recommended for upper-division and graduate-level courses in gender and communication, feminist theory, organizational communication, health communication, instructional communication, and applied communication. This anthology is also recommended as a research resource for scholars in Women’s Studies, Family Studies, and Business and Management.

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