This carefully crafted ebook: “ULYSSES (Modern Classics Series)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It is considered to be one of the most important works of modernist literature, and has been called "a demonstration and summation of the entire movement". Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904. Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer's epic poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between its characters and events and those of the poem (the correspondence of Leopold Bloom to Odysseus, Molly Bloom to Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus to Telemachus). Joyce divided Ulysses into 18 chapters or "episodes". At first glance much of the book may appear unstructured and chaotic; Joyce once said that he had "put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant", which would earn the novel "immortality". James Joyce (1882-1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses, the short-story collection Dubliners, and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Finnegans Wake.
Ranging from Darwin to the accomplishments of Nobel laureate Hermann J. Muller, a history of genetics as seen through the eyes of a dozen or so central players offers readers the background they need to understand the latest findings in genetics and future trends in the field.
When Siraj, the ruler of Bengal, overran the British settlement of Calcutta in 1756, he allegedly jailed 146 European prisoners overnight in a cramped prison. Of the group, 123 died of suffocation. While this episode was never independently confirmed, the story of "the black hole of Calcutta" was widely circulated and seen by the British public as an atrocity committed by savage colonial subjects. The Black Hole of Empire follows the ever-changing representations of this historical event and founding myth of the British Empire in India, from the eighteenth century to the present. Partha Chatterjee explores how a supposed tragedy paved the ideological foundations for the "civilizing" force of British imperial rule and territorial control in India. Chatterjee takes a close look at the justifications of modern empire by liberal thinkers, international lawyers, and conservative traditionalists, and examines the intellectual and political responses of the colonized, including those of Bengali nationalists. The two sides of empire's entwined history are brought together in the story of the Black Hole memorial: set up in Calcutta in 1760, demolished in 1821, restored by Lord Curzon in 1902, and removed in 1940 to a neglected churchyard. Challenging conventional truisms of imperial history, nationalist scholarship, and liberal visions of globalization, Chatterjee argues that empire is a necessary and continuing part of the history of the modern state. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.
The story of the Texas-bred horse who became a racing star in 1946, the year of his Triple Crown win. Injured as a baby, Assault walked with a limp for the rest of his life, but when he ran he was pure speed and grace.
Annotation Six essays discuss definitions and explanations of folklore, and methods of teaching it. Then 15 additional essays explore Texas folklore related to such topics as police burials, gang graffiti, fiddling, ghosts, dance halls, oil fields, spring rituals, and the dialect spoken along the border between Texas and Mexico. Numerous illustrations and black-and-white photographs. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
American Mobilities investigates representations of mobility - social, economic, geographic - in American film and literature during the Depression, WWII, and the early Cold War. With an emphasis on the dual meaning of "domestic," referring to both the family home and the nation, this study traces the important trope of mobility that runs through the "American" century. Juxtaposing canonical fiction with popular, and low-budget independent films with Classical Hollywood, Leyda brings the analytic tools of American cultural and literary studies to bear on an eclectic array of primary texts as she builds a case for the significance of mobility in the study of the United States.
9.5 Lameness and Muscle Weakness-Inducing Plants -- 9.6 Plant-Induced Calcinosis -- 9.7 Selenium Toxicosis -- 9.8 Anemia-Inducing Plants -- 9.9 Teratogenic Plants -- 9.10 Sudden Death-Inducing Plants -- 9.11 Larkspur -- 9.12 Monkshood -- 9.13 Poison Hemlock -- 9.14 Water Hemlock -- 9.15 Yew -- 9.16 Death Camas -- 9.17 Avocado -- Supplemental Reading -- References -- Index -- End User License Agreement
Seven Pillars of Wisdom is the autobiographical account of the experiences of British soldier Thomas E. Lawrence (1888-1935) ("Lawrence of Arabia"), while serving as a liaison officer with rebel forces during the Arab Revolt against the Ottoman Turks of 1916 to 1918. Charles Hill has called the Seven Pillars "a novel traveling under the cover of autobiography," capturing Lawrence's highly personal version of the historical events described in the book. Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Edward Lawrence, known professionally as T. E. Lawrence, was a British Army officer renowned especially for his liaison role during the Arab Revolt against Ottoman Turkish rule of 1916–18. The extraordinary breadth and variety of his activities and associations, and his ability to describe them vividly in writing, earned him international fame as Lawrence of Arabia, a title which was used for the 1962 film based on his World War I activities. “ The book is very well illustrated. ”
"Journeys in Persia and Kurdistan - Volume III" from Isabella Bird. English explorer, writer, photographer and naturalist (1831 - 1904).
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The Socio-economic Organisation of the Urartian Kingdom is an insightful and critical study of the social, economic and administrative structure of the Urartian civilisation of eastern Anatolia, Armenia and north-west Iran in the 9th-6th centuries BC.
This volume offers an overview of the processes of zoonotic viral emergence, the intricacies of host/virus interactions, and the role of biological transitions and modifying factors. The themes introduced here are amplified and explored in detail by the contributing authors, who explore the mechanisms and unique circumstances by which evolution, biology, history, and current context have contrived to drive the emergence of different zoonotic agents by a series of related events.
This book is intended as an introductory text for students studying a wide range of courses concerned with animal management, zoo biology and wildlife conservation, and should also be useful to zookeepers and other zoo professionals. It is divided into three parts. Part 1 considers the function of zoos, their history, how zoos are managed, ethics, zoo legislation and wildlife conservation law. Part 2 discusses the design of zoos and zoo exhibits, animal nutrition, reproduction, animal behaviour (including enrichment and training), animal welfare, veterinary care, animal handling and transportation. Finally, Part 3 discusses captive breeding programmes, genetics, population biology, record keeping, and the educational role of zoos, including a consideration of visitor behaviour. It concludes with a discussion of the role of zoos in the conservation of species in the wild and in species reintroductions. This book takes an international perspective and includes a wide range of examples of the operation of zoos and breeding programmes particularly in the UK, Europe, North America and Australasia. Visit www.wiley.com/go/rees/zoo to access the artwork from the book.

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