Written by two of the country's top genealogists, Trace Your Roots with DNA is the first book to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer. After a brief introduction to genealogy and genetics fundamentals, the authors explain the types of available testing, what kind of information the tests can provide, how to interpret the results, and how the tests work (it doesn't involve digging up your dead relatives). It's in expensive, easy to do, and the results are accurate: It's as simple as swabbing the inside of your cheek and popping a sample in the mail. Family lore has it that a branch of our family emigrated to Argentina and now I've found some people there with our name. Can testing tell us whether we're from the same family? My mother was adopted and doesn't know her ethnicity. Are there any tests available to help her learn about her heritage? I just discovered someone else with my highly unusual surname. How can we find out if we have a common ancestor? These are just a few of the types of genealogical scenarios readers can pursue. The authors reveal exactly what is possible-and what is not possible-with genetic testing. They include case studies of both famous historial mysteries and examples of ordinary folks whose exploration of genetic genealogy has enabled them to trace their roots.
Die Einteilung von Menschen in Rassen ist eine der umstrittensten Praktiken biologischer Forschung. Doch statt ihres Endes zeichnet sich in den letzten Jahrzehnten eine Renaissance rassifizierter Konzepte ab. Tino Plümeckes detaillierte Studie geht erstmals der Frage nach, wieso Rasse immer wieder Teil modernster Forschungen werden konnte. Analysiert werden die Rassifizierungen in verschiedenen biologischen Disziplinen und die Entwicklungslinien im Kontext genetischer Ansätze. Das Buch führt Kompetenzen aus den Bio- sowie Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften zusammen und liefert einen Beitrag zur Weiterentwicklung kritischer und intervenierender Wissenschaftsforschung.
The authors provide valuable information specific for African travel and tracing African genealogy using traditional methods, the Internet and DNA technology.
Here's how to trace Jewish DNA specific to Eastern European Ashkenazim through a history of migrations toward a merging mosaic of communities. A perfect book for beginners in interpreting your DNA test results for family history and ancestry and taking a closer look at the founding mothers of Eastern European Jewish communities as well as the fathers. Where did the women originate? What directions were the migrations in ancient, medieval, and later times? And how did this bring about the particular DNA/genetic patterns we see today in the diverse Eastern European Jewish communities now found all over the world. Look up the genealogy of Jewish genes/DNA through 3,000 years of history. Here's how to interpret your own results. You don't need a science background to match your DNA to your most recent common ancestor who lived 250 or 100 or 1,000 years ago. Scientists speak out on the founding mothers and fathers of the Ashkenazic Jewish communities.
It's natural to want to know where you come from. But the answer to that question goes beyond your parents or grandparents. With the aid of today's science and technology, as well as the wealth of historical and anthropological information available, discovering your roots can become a profound journey into the distant past. After seeing the ancestry results of his DNA analysis, author David Mahal was drawn to research further into his Indian subcontinent roots. What he discovered was a rich history of people from diverse cultures, languages, and religions that, for all their differences, are still genetically linked. Mirroring his multifaceted subject matter, Before India is a fascinating, well-researched amalgamation of genres-part genealogical guide, part ethnic history, part science exposé-that draws a more holistic picture of ancestry by combining these varied insights. Exploring topics such as the origin of our planet and human evolution, as well as how DNA analysis is used to trace deep ancestry, this distinctive guide provides both a robust explanation of genealogy and penetrating insight into India's colorful tapestry of unique ethnic groups. While this easy-to-read text is a particularly perfect launching point for people whose ancestry ties them to the Indian subcontinent, any reader will benefit from Mahal's thorough suggestions on how to trace your lineage to an ancestral group going back thousands of years. The book includes a research study of the ancestral origins of several key ethnic communities in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, along with some communities of Indian and Pakistani origin in Singapore, Malaysia, and the United Kingdom.
Who are we, and where do we come from? The fundamental drive to answer these questions is at the heart of Finding Your Roots, the companion book to the hit PBS documentary series. As scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. clearly demonstrates, the tools of cutting-edge genomics and deep genealogical research now allow us to learn more about our roots and look further back in time than ever before. In the second season, Gates's investigation takes on the personal and genealogical histories of more than twenty luminaries, including Ken Burns, Stephen King, Derek Jeter, Governor Deval Patrick, Valerie Jarrett, and Sally Field. As Gates interlaces these moving stories of immigration, assimilation, strife, and success, he provides practical information for amateur genealogists just beginning archival research on their own families' roots and details the advances in genetic research now available to the public. The result is an illuminating exploration of who we are, how we lost track of our roots, and how we can find them again.
You've heard of the Dog Whisperer? Meet the Ancestor Rescuer. Part forensic scientist, part master sleuth, Megan Smolenyak has solved some of America's oldest and most fascinating genealogical mysteries. You've read the headlines; now get the inside story as the "Indiana Jones of genealogy" reveals how she cracked her news-making cases, became the face of this increasingly popular field--and redefined history along the way. How did Smolenyak discover Barack Obama's Irish ancestry--and his relation to Brad Pitt? Or the journey of Michelle Obama's family from slavery to the White House? Or the startling links between outspoken politicians Al Sharpton and Strom Thurmond? And why is Smolenyak's name squared? Test your own skills as she shares her exciting secrets. Whether she's scouring websites to uncover the surprising connections between famous figures or using cutting-edge DNA tests to locate family members of fallen soldiers dating back to the Civil War, Smolenyak's historical sleuthing is as provocative, richly layered, and exciting as America itself. "Thank you for taking the time to lay out our family map. . . You're practically family. You certainly know more about us than we do." –Stephen Colbert "Megan is a genealogist's dream, a forensic investigator who can also tell a great story." –Sam Roberts, The New York Times "Megan is a blessing to cold case detectives and a master genealogist." –Julie M. Haney, special agent, NCIS Cold Case Homicide Unit "The Indiana Jones of genealogy. . . Megan Smolenyak is a national treasure." –Buzzy Jackson, author of Shaking the Family Tree "In this breezy narrative, Smolenyak allows us to look over the shoulder of a relentless genealogist as she works the puzzle pieces of her craft. Whether unearthing evidence from Internet databases, newspaper offices, court houses, libraries and cemeteries, consulting translators, historians or her vast network of fellow genealogists, pioneering the use of genealogical DNA testing, solving the mystery or occasionally hitting a brick wall, Smolenyak remains wholly committed, curious and cheery, eager to share her methods and excitement. Bottom-up history from a top-shelf researcher."-Kirkus Review Megan Smolenyak is an incurable genealogist who loves solving mysteries, making unexpected discoveries, and pushing the boundaries of conventional genealogy. A popular writer, speaker, and TV guest, she does all she can to get the g-word out there and inspire others in their quest for roots. She has appeared on Good Morning America, the Today show, CNN, NPR, and the BBC, and consulted on shows ranging from Who Do You Think You Are? to Top Chef. Megan is the author of six books (including Who Do You Think You Are? The Essential Guide to Tracing Your Family History, companion guide to the NBC series), a Huffington Post contributor, and former chief family historian and spokesperson for Ancestry.com. She lives in southern New Jersey with her husband and lots of research tools.
This book reveals what you always wanted to know about the issues of life, death and the afterlife. Supported by Scriptures, it reveals shocking truths about heaven, hell and your birthright blessing. There're four components to God’s birthright (covenant) blessing which are His (1) word blessing, (2) peach blessing, (3) wealth blessing, and (4) eternal life blessing. God set this inheritance aside for you before you were born. There's enough abundance in your birthright blessing to fulfill every need you have. It entitles you to dwell in a land of utopia whereby your peace, health, friendships, quality of life, holiness and well being are absolutely perfect. Speaking of the good life, it doesn't get any better than this. This book shows that (1) you have a personal calling on your life (you’re created for a purpose), and (2) your racial group has a calling to fulfill. You need to know your personal and racial callings, for they are eternal. Before you can appreciate what God has in store for you, you need to know who you are (the real you that God created you to be). This book reveals the real you. This book also confirms the reality and location of heaven and the materials saints’ new bodies will be made of. It shows what saints do in Paradise now and forevermore. You'll be delighted and pleasantly surprised to know your heavenly activities. This book reveals (1) where Hades is located (the temporary abode of sinners called the region of disembodied spirits), (2) where the permanent place of torment is located called the eternal lake of fire, and (3) the cursed materials sinners’ bodies will consist of. In hell, sinners' bodies will burn to ashes and be recycled to burn all over again. God's Scriptures confirm these truths.
650 Millionen Europäer sollen von nur sieben Urmüttern abstammen? Sie meinen, das kann nicht sein? Bryan Sykes, Professor für Genetik an der Universität Oxford, hat die Mitochondrien-DNA Tausender Europäer analysiert und konnte dabei sieben Bausteine entdeckten, die sich auf sieben Töchter der Urmutter Eva zurückführen lassen. Darüber hinaus lässt sich sagen, wann unsere Vorfahren erstmals auftraten, wo und wie sie lebten und wohin sie gingen ═ somit kann jeder von uns herausfinden, von welchem der sieben Stämme er abstammt: Folgen Sie Bryan Sykes auf seiner sensationellen Reise in unsere Vergangenheit!
Tracing Your Northern Irish Ancestors is an expert introduction for the family historian to the wealth of material available to researchers in archives throughout Northern Ireland. Many records, like the early twentieth-century census returns and school registers, will be familiar to researchers, but others are often overlooked by all but the most experienced of genealogists. An easy-to-use, informative guide to the comprehensive collections available at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland is a key feature of Ian Maxwell's handbook. He also takes the reader through the records held in many libraries, museums and heritage centers across the province, and he provides detailed coverage of records that are available online. Unlike the rest of the British Isles, which has very extensive civil and census records, Irish ancestral research is hampered by the destruction of many of the major collections. Yet Ian Maxwell shows how family historians can make good use of church records, school registers and land and valuation records to trace their roots to the beginning of the nineteenth century and beyond. REVIEWS " a well written book that is easy to recommend" FGS Forum, Fall 2011
"Native American DNA" intrigues scientists and non-scientists alike from the high-tech anthropology lab, to the genetic genealogist's treasured personal archive, to the glossy world of corporate or made-for-television science. But what is "Native American DNA"? In technical language, it is a set of genetic markers (nucleotides) that appear at different frequencies among different populations: the highest frequencies of so-called Native American markers have been observed by scientists in "unadmixed" native populations in North and South America. But "Native American DNA" should not be understood simply as an objective molecular "thing." It is simultaneously a conceptual apparatus through which humans constitute and deploy life-organizing narratives: historical and national narratives, narratives about race and ethnicity, family and tribe. Sometimes genetic narratives border on the religious, exploring the "origins" of peoples or explaining who individuals "really are." I provide a condensed history of the science of race, tracing a genealogy of "Native American DNA" as a research object and a tool for categorizing both molecules and human beings. I then turn ethnographer to study an on-line community of "genetic genealogists" who use DNA to help trace family histories. From there, I cross into a strange hybrid world where science meets corporate marketing. I mine rich language and imagery--narratives of origins, race, and tribe--woven into the World Wide Web by several DNA testing companies and by the Genographic Project. Mostly, I do not study Native American or tribal perspectives on DNA. I study those who are under-studied, yet culturally influential: scientists and financially-able lovers of science, who incorporate knowledge of particular molecular sequences into their understandings of "Native American." Crucially, such extra-tribal understandings do not require any reference to the historical-regulatory paradigm of US tribal governance. While I do not study tribes, I address them. "Native American DNA" testing embeds non-tribal philosophical assumptions that may undermine tribal governance and identities. I close with suggestions for how indigenous methodologies offer a way to challenge genetics as the ultimate way of knowing about race, tribe, kinship, and individual identity.
Genealogists are now using molecular genealogy-comparing and matching people by matrilineal DNA lineages-mtDNA or patrilineal Y-chromosome ancestry and/or racial percentages tests. People interested in ancestry now look at genetic markers to trace the migrations of the human species. Here's how to trace your genealogy by DNA from your grandparents back 10,000 or more years. Anyone can be interested in DNA for ancestry research, but of interest to Jews from Eastern Europe is to see how different populations from a mosaic of communities reached their current locations. From who are you descended? What markers will shed light on your deepest ancestry? You can study DNA for medical reasons or to discover the geographic travels and dwelling places of some of your ancestors. How do Europeans in general fit into the great migrations of prehistory that took all to where they are today based on their genetic DNA markers and sequences? Where is the geographic center of their origin and the roots of all people? Specifically, how can you interpret your DNA test for family history as a beginner in researching ancestry and your own family history?
What role does history play in contemporary society? Has the frenetic pace of today’s world led people to lose contact with the past? A high-profile team of researchers from across Canada sought to answer these questions by launching an ambitious investigation into how Canadians engage with history in their everyday lives. The results of their survey form the basis of this eye-opening book. Canadians and Their Pasts reports on the findings of interviews with 3,419 Canadians from a variety of cultural and linguistic communities. Along with yielding rich qualitative data, the surveys generated revealing quantitative data that allows for comparisons based on gender, ethnicity, migration histories, region, age, income, and educational background. The book also brings Canada into international conversation with similar studies undertaken earlier in the United States, Australia, and Europe. Canadians and Their Pasts confirms that, for most Canadians, the past is not dead. Rather, it reveals that our histories continue to shape the present in many powerful ways.
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
Die aufregende Geschichte der Entschlüsselung des Neandertalergenoms – und das lebendige Porträt der neuen Wissenschaft der Paläogenetik In einer folgenreichen Nacht im Jahre 1996 gelang Svante Pääbo die Entschlüsselung der ersten DNA-Sequenzen eines Neandertalers. Eine Sensation! Die verblüffenden Erkenntnisse revolutionierten unser Bild von der Entwicklung des Homo sapiens. Jetzt erzählt der preisgekrönte Wissenschaftler seine persönliche Geschichte und verschränkt sie mit der Geschichte des neuen Gebiets, das er maßgeblich mitentwickelte: der Paläogenetik - von den ersten Analysen an altägyptischen Mumien bis hin zu Mammuts, Höhlenbären und Riesenfaultieren. Ein faszinierender Blick hinter die Kulissen der Spitzenforschung in Deutschland und der spannende Entwicklungsroman einer Wissenschaft, deren Ergebnisse vor wenigen Jahrzehnten noch niemand erahnen konnte

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