Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. Taking into account the scholarly literature, not only sources written in English but also in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, the book draws on the author's extensive academic and practical work in international criminal law. This third volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the procedures and implementation of international law by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Through analysis of the framework of international criminal procedure, the author considers each stage in the process of proceedings before the ICC, including the role of legal participants, the scope of jurisdiction, and the enforcement of sentences. The full three-volume treatise addresses the entirety of international criminal law, re-stating and re-examining the fundamental principles upon which it rests, the manner it is enacted, and the key issues that are shaping its future. It is essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law alike.
Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. Taking into account the scholarly literature, not only sources written in English but also in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, the book draws on the author's extensive academic and practical work in international criminal law. This third volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the procedures and implementation of international law by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Through analysis of the framework of international criminal procedure, the author considers each stage in the process of proceedings before the ICC, including the role of legal participants, the scope of jurisdiction, and the enforcement of sentences. The full three-volume treatise addresses the entirety of international criminal law, re-stating and re-examining the fundamental principles upon which it rests, the manner it is enacted, and the key issues that are shaping its future. It is essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law alike.
Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. Taking into account the scholarly literature, not only sources written in English but also in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, the book draws on the author's extensive academic and practical work in international criminal law. This second volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the core international crimes, namely, genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and aggression. It also assesses relevant treaty crimes. It examines in detail the problem of concours delictorum and the law of sentencing, offering proposals for the development of a more consistent sentencing regime. The full three-volume treatise will address the entirety of international criminal law, re-stating and re-examining the fundamental principles upon which it rests, the manner it is enacted, and the key issues that are shaping its future. It will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law alike.
This Understanding treatise is divided into four parts: • The first part provides a general overview, with definitions to key terms that appear throughout the book. It covers the area of jurisdiction, as this is the starting point in determining the applicability of using international law • The second part covers selected areas of international criminal law. It is not exhaustive of all areas of international or transnational law. Choices of specific crimes to cover were made on the basis of showing a diversity of topics, new and developing areas such as computer crimes, and the older more traditional areas such as piracy. It provides materials on both violent and non-violent crimes. Areas of immediate importance, such as terrorism and narcotics trafficking, are discussed • The third part covers procedural issues. It includes constitutional issues, immunities, obtaining evidence from abroad, obtaining people from abroad, and post-conviction issues such as prisoner transfers • The final part of this treatise covers the international aspects of international criminal law. In addition to examining what constitutes an international crime, it looks at human rights issues, international tribunals, and the International Criminal Court.
An examination of the criminal responsibility of individuals for the commission of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
By offering both a comprehensive update and new material reflecting the continuing development of the subject, this continues to be the leading textbook on international criminal law. Its experienced author team draws on its combined expertise as teachers, scholars and practitioners to offer an authoritative survey of the field. The third edition contains new material on the theory of international criminal law, the practice of international criminal tribunals, the developing case law on principles of liability and procedures and new practice on immunities. It offers valuable supporting online materials such as case studies, worked examples and study guides. Retaining its comprehensive coverage, clarity and critical analysis, it remains essential reading for all in the field.
The move to end impunity for human rights atrocities has seen the creation of international and hybrid tribunals and increased prosecutions in domestic courts. The Oxford Companion to International Criminal Justice is the first major reference work to provide a complete overview of this emerging field. Its nearly 1100 pages are divided into three sections. In the first part, 21 essays by leading thinkers offer a comprehensive survey of issues and debates surrounding international humanitarian law, international criminal law, and their enforcement. The second part is arranged alphabetically, containing 320 entries on doctrines, procedures, institutions and personalities. The final part contains over 400 case summaries on different trials from international and domestic courts dealing with war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, torture, and terrorism. With analysis and commentary on every aspect of international criminal justice, this Companion is designed to be the first port of call for scholars and practitioners interested in current developments in international justice.
Since their creation, the European Union and the Council of Europe have worked to harmonise the justice systems of their member states. This project has been met with a series of challenges. European Criminal Law offers a compelling insight into the development and functions of European criminal law. It tracks the historical development of European criminal law, offering a detailed critical analysis of the criminal justice systems responsible for its implementation. While the rapid expansion and transnationalisation of criminal law is a necessary response to the growing numbers of free movement of persons and goods, it has serious implications for the rights of European citizens and needs to be balanced with rights protections. With its close analysis of secondary legislation and reliance on a wide variety of original sources, this book provides a thorough understanding of European Criminal Law and the institutions involved.
This volume considers the way in which the focus on individual rights may constitute an obstacle to ensuring fairness in criminal proceedings. The increasingly cosmopolitan nature of criminal justice, forcing legal systems with different institutional forms and practices to interact with each other as they attempt to combat crime beyond national borders, has accentuated the need for systems to seek legitimacy beyond their domestic traditions. Fairness, expressed in terms of the right to a fair trial in provisions such as Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, has emerged across Europe as the principal means of guaranteeing the legitimacy of criminal proceedings. The consequence of this is that criminal procedure doctrines are framed overwhelmingly in 'constitutional' terms – the protection of defence rights is necessary to restrict and legitimate the state's mandate to prosecute crime. Yet there are various problems with relying solely or predominantly on defence rights as a means of ensuring that proceedings are 'fair' or legitimate and these issues are rarely discussed in the academic literature. In this volume, scholars from the disciplines of law, philosophy and sociology challenge various normative assumptions underpinning our understanding of fairness in criminal proceedings.
The procedural law applied by international criminal tribunals usually involves a mixture of common law and civil law, which is especially the case at the International Criminal Court. As a result, many procedural points remain unclear or controversial. This book sets out the ICC's procedural regime and suggests a coherent theoretical underpinning.
A guide to the law that applies in the international criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone.
"This edition remains, as its preceding ones, the most comprehensive text on the subject of international extradition, as practiced in and by the United States, and in general about the international practice of extradition". -- FOREWORD.
Principles of International Criminal Law has become one of the most influential textbooks in the field of international criminal justice. It offers a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the foundations and general principles of substantive international criminal law, including thorough discussion of its core crimes. It provides a detailed understanding of the general principles, sources, and evolution of international criminal law, demonstrating how it has developed, and how its application has changed. After establishing the general principles, the book assesses the four key international crimes as defined by the statute of the International Criminal Court: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. This new edition revises and updates work with developments in international criminal justice since 2009. It includes new material on the principle of culpability as one of the fundamental principles of international criminal law, the notion of terrorism as a crime under international law, the concept of direct participation in hostilities, the problem of so-called unlawful combatants, and the issue of targeted killings. The book retains its highly-acclaimed systematic approach and consistent methodology, making the book essential reading for both students and scholars of international criminal law, as well as for practitioners and judges working in the field.
International criminal law has seen significant developments in recent years, as the jurisprudence of the International Criminal Court has expanded, alongside the practice of other international criminal tribunals. International criminal law is increasingly a concern of domestic courts as well, with international legal issues arising from domestic cases. This book presents a comprehensive overview of the field, assessing the subject in the context of wider public international law. In particular, this book complements discussion of the 'core crimes' of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes, with a full treatment of wider issues that arise. These include the international rules governing national criminal jurisdiction; the crime of piracy; the raft of multilateral treaties defining and creating obligations in respect of international crimes, including terrorist crimes, and of the so-far unsuccessful attempts to conclude a comprehensive convention on terrorism; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes at the national level; and the activities of the United Nations Security Council in relation to international crimes.This book provides an in-depth study of the ways in which domestic courts prosecute international crimes. Its analysis encompasses the international rules on the permissible reach of national criminal jurisdiction; the substantive law of international crimes; the prosecution and punishment of international crimes, and the prosecution and punishment of municipal crimes by international criminal courts or by municipal courts with international elements; and the involvement of international organs, such as the United Nations Security Council, in the suppression of international and municipal criminal wrongdoing. The book also includes more formal conceptual analysis of the very notion of an 'international crime' and of an 'international criminal tribunal', as well as a detailed account of the rise of individual criminal responsibility under international law. The book is written in a direct, concise, and precise style, making it a perfect resource for ICL practitioners, as well as scholars and advanced students.
This book explains why international criminal tribunals struggle to monitor inciting speech, and proposes a model of prevention and punishment.
Volume 3 addresses the direct enforcement system, namely international criminal tribunals, how they came about and how they functioned, tracing that history from the end of WWI to the ICC, including the post-WWII experiences. They address the IMT, IMTFE, ICTY, ICTR, the mixed model tribunals and the ICC. It also contains a chapter which addresses some of the problems of the direct enforcement system, namely the general, procedural, evidentiary, and sanctions parts of ICL, which is largely made of what is contained in the statutes of the tribunals mentioned above as well as the jurisprudence of the established tribunals. In addition this volume addresses national experiences with the enforcement of certain international crimes. It is divided into 4 chapters which are titled as: Chapter 1: History of International Investigations and Prosecutions (International Criminal Accountability; International Criminal Justice in Historical Perspective); Chapter 2: International Criminal Tribunals and Mixed Model Tribunals (The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda; The Making of the International Criminal Court; Mixed Models of International Criminal Justice; Special Court for Sierra Leone; Special Tribunal for Cambodia; East Timor); Chapter 3: National Prosecutions for International Crimes (National Prosecutions for International Crimes; National Prosecutions of International Crimes: A Historical Overview; The French Experience; The Belgian Experience; The Dutch Experience; Indonesia; The U.S. War Crimes Act of 1996; Enforcing ICL Violations with Civil Remedies: The Case of the U.S. Alien Tort Claims Act); Chapter 4: Contemporary Issues in International Criminal Law Doctrine and Practice (Command Responsibility; Joint Criminal Enterprise; The Responsibility of Peacekeepers; The General Part: Judicial Developments; Ne bis in idem; Plea Bargains; Issues Pertaining to the Evidentiary Part of International Criminal Law; Penalties and Sentencing; Penalties: From Leipzig to Arusha; Victimsa (TM) Rights in International Law).
"This book follows as LAW"--
This book is a guide to the law that applies in the three international criminal tribunals, for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone, set up by the UN during the period 1993 to 2002 to deal with atrocities and human rights abuses committed during conflict in those countries. Building on the work of an earlier generation of war crimes courts, these tribunals have developed a sophisticated body of law concerning the elements of the three international crimes (genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes), and forms of participation in such crimes, as well as other general principles of international criminal law, procedural matters and sentencing. The legacy of the tribunals will be indispensable as international law moves into a more advanced stage, with the establishment of the International Criminal Court. Their judicial decisions are examined here, as well as the drafting history of their statutes and other contemporary sources.
This book provides legal commentary on every article of the Statute of the International Criminal Court. The text is written by 45 experts from 18 countries. Case law and other sources relevant to the interpretation of the Statute are discussed and referenced.
This index to the definitive reference work on international law contains detailed references to over 1,600 articles covering the full history and breadth of public international law, as well as other information to facilitate its use, such as tables and citation lists.

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