Located only blocks from Tokyo's glittering Ginza, Tsukiji—the world's largest marketplace for seafood—is a prominent landmark, well known but little understood by most Tokyoites: a supplier for countless fishmongers and sushi chefs, and a popular and fascinating destination for foreign tourists. Early every morning, the worlds of hi-tech and pre-tech trade noisily converge as tens of thousands of tons of seafood from every ocean of the world quickly change hands in Tsukiji's auctions and in the marketplace's hundreds of tiny stalls. In this absorbing firsthand study, Theodore C. Bestor—who has spent a dozen years doing fieldwork at fish markets and fishing ports in Japan, North America, Korea, and Europe—explains the complex social institutions that organize Tsukiji's auctions and the supply lines leading to and from them and illuminates trends of Japan's economic growth, changes in distribution and consumption, and the increasing globalization of the seafood trade. As he brings to life the sights and sounds of the marketplace, he reveals Tsukiji's rich internal culture, its place in Japanese cuisine, and the mercantile traditions that have shaped the marketplace since the early seventeenth century.
The Routledge Handbook of Japanese Culture and Society is an interdisciplinary resource that focuses on contemporary Japan and the social and cultural trends that are important at the beginning of the twenty-first century. This Handbook provides a cutting-edge and comprehensive survey of significant phenomena, institutions, and directions in Japan today, on issues ranging from gender and family, the environment, race and ethnicity, and urban life, to popular culture and electronic media. Written by an international team of Japan experts, the chapters included in the volume form an accessible and fascinating insight into Japanese culture and society. As such, the Handbook will be an invaluable reference tool for anyone interested in all things Japanese. Students, teachers and professionals alike will benefit from the broad ranging discussions, useful links to online resources and suggested reading lists. The Handbook will be of interest across a wide range of disciplines including Japanese Studies, Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Sociology and Asian Studies in general.
The financial industry's invention of complex products such as credit default swaps and other derivatives has been widely blamed for triggering the global financial crisis of 2008. In Codes of Finance, Vincent Antonin Lépinay, a former employee of one of the world’s leading investment banks, takes readers behind the scenes of the equity derivatives business at the bank before the crisis, providing a detailed firsthand account of the creation, marketing, selling, accounting, and management of these financial instruments—and of how they ultimately created havoc inside and outside the bank.
Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago. During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies. Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos. This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.
In a lively account of the American tuna industry's fortunes and misfortunes over the past century, a celebrated food writer relates how tuna went from being sold primarily as a fertiliser to becoming the most commonly consumed fish in the US. Tuna is both the subject and the backdrop for other facets of American history.
Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.
From Communists to Foreign Capitalists explores the intersections of two momentous changes in the late twentieth century: the fall of Communism and the rise of globalization. Delving into the economic change that accompanied these shifts in central and Eastern Europe, Nina Bandelj presents a pioneering sociological treatment of the process of foreign direct investment (FDI). She demonstrates how both investors and hosts rely on social networks, institutions, politics, and cultural understandings to make decisions about investment, employing practical rather than rational economic strategies to deal with the true uncertainty that plagues the postsocialist environment. The book explores how eleven postsocialist countries address the very idea of FDI as an integral part of their market transition. The inflows of foreign capital after the collapse of Communism resulted not from the withdrawal of states from the economy, as is commonly expected, but rather from the active involvement of postsocialist states in institutionalizing and legitimizing FDI. Using a wide array of data sources, and combining a macro-level account of national variation in the liberalization to foreign capital with a micro-level account of FDI transactions in the decade following the collapse of Communism in 1989, the book reveals how social forces not only constrain economic transformations but also make them possible. From Communists to Foreign Capitalists is a welcome addition to the growing literature on the social processes that shape economic life.
"Lynne Anderson's portraits of recent immigrant families capture a crucial truth about how real food connects us to our culture, our memories, and to one another. This is an important book." —Alice Waters, Chez Panisse Restaurant "Everyone loves talking about food. In this remarkable book, Lynne Anderson lets recent immigrants to America speak in their own words about the foods they most loved from their homelands. Her cook-storytellers use recipes for cherished foods as a way to recall childhood memories, the events that caused them to emigrate, and their efforts to assimilate—the bitter along with the sweet. For a delicious introduction to the immigrant experience in America, I can't think of a better starting point than Breaking Bread." —Marion Nestle, author of What to Eat and Food Politics "Good ol' home cooking that's not chicken and apple pie. A feast of stories and flavors." Amy Tan, author of The Joy Luck Club and the Bone Setter's Daughter "What's so lovely to me about this book is hearing the actual voices of the people and the unpredictable way their conversations about food capture life issues and truths that extend far beyond the kitchen. More than ever it seems critical to be finding and celebrating what we have in common and the connections between people."—Nikki Silva, co-author of Hidden Kitchens: Stories, Recipes, and More from NPR's The Kitchen Sisters "Breaking Bread throws open a delightful window on the immigrant kitchen in America, capturing the voices, traditions and--yes!--recipes of a couple dozen different food cultures in a single volume." —Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma and In Defense of Food "In 25 deeply moving first-person accounts from a wide range of immigrant families, each one sensitively introduced by the author, Lynne Anderson takes us straight to the heart of our common humanity. Sharing food and stories are what bind us all across differences in time, space culture, gender and identity. Apart from being an important cultural document, Breaking Bread is a rich, wisdom-packed experience for the scholar, for the casual reader and for all cooks who demand more than just recipes."—Niloufer Ichaporia King, author of My Bombay Kitchen
Facts101 is your complete guide to Anthropological Theory, An Introductory History. In this book, you will learn topics such as PART III: Chapter 27 - Chapter 41, plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.
The award-winning Rough Guide to Japan makes the ideal travel companion to one of the world's most unique and dynamic countries. In full colour throughout, this opinionated guide is packed with essential information on the latest and best places to sleep, eat, party and shop, as well as pointers on etiquette and other cultural niceties. From neon-soaked Tokyo to temple-studded Kyoto and snow-topped Mount Fuji, all of the major travel hotspots are covered in full, while the guide also points the way to off-the-beaten-track gems - take a live-volcano hot spring on Kyushu island, go diving in tropical Okinawa, or wind your way through mountain traverses in the Japan Alps. Gain a richer understanding of the country through chapters on Japan's history, religions, arts, movies and music plus coverage of pressing environmental issues. There are maps of all the main tourist destinations, together with easy-to-read colour transport maps covering the Tokyo and Osaka train and subway systems. Make the most of your time with The Rough Guide to Japan. Now available in ePub format.
Der preisgekrönte Autor und passionierte Angler Paul Greenberg nimmt uns mit auf eine Reise über die Flüsse und Meere dieser Welt und erzählt die Geschichte jener vier Fischarten, die mittlerweile überall die Speisekarten beherrschen: Lachs, Barsch, Kabeljau und Thunfisch. Er besucht norwegische Großfarmen, die jährlich 500 000 Tonnen Lachs produzieren - mit Hilfe genetischer Techniken, die ursprünglich bei der Schafzucht zum Einsatz kamen. In Alaska besichtigt er die einzige Fair-Trade-Fischerei der Welt. Er erklärt, warum die Meerestiere zunehmend mit Quecksilber und anderen Schadstoffen belastet sind, und schildert, wie der Mittelmeerbarsch zu einer global nachgefragten Ware werden konnte. Greenberg stellt viele der Fragen, die immer mehr Menschen beim Anblick einer Speisekarte oder der Tiefkühltruhe unseres Supermarkts beschäftigen: Was ist der Unterschied zwischen Wild-, Zucht- und Biofisch? Welchen Fisch können wir bedenkenlos essen? Was bedeutet Überfischung eigentlich? Lassen sich Fische wirklich domestizieren wie andere Tiere auch, oder sollten wir generell aufhören, Fisch zu essen? Fische, so Greenbergs Fazit, sind unser letztes wirklich ?wildes Nahrungsmittel. Womöglich nicht mehr lange. Nur wenn wir besser verstehen, unter welchen Bedingungen und um welchen Preis Fisch auf unseren Tellern landet, werden wir dem Lebensraum - und der Nahrungsquelle - Meer mit neuer, dringend gebotener Achtung begegnen.
Includes section "Reviews".
Despite the negative press Asian economies have received in connection with the recent financial crisis, their record of spectacular growth over the past few decades remains irrefutable. In an effort to provide a rich, textured analysis of these economies, editor W. Mark Fruin presents a collection of essays that explores the wide range of network organizations that have been established in the Pacific Rim. Conventional studies of economic organization have tended to center on markets and hierarchies, the two forms of organization most common in the West. But today the world moves too quickly and too unpredictably for the idealized organizations of microeconomic theory to keep up. It is no accident that the region that has generated the world's most explosive economic growth is also the region where network organizations--sets of independent actors who cooperate frequently for mutual advantage--are most pervasive. Rapid economic, social, and technical changes favor the formation of network organizations, and vice versa. The contributors to this volume identify and elucidate four basic types of networks: naturally occurring networks, market replacing networks, hierarchy replacing networks, and market enhancing networks. They show how all of these have been shaped by the history, government, legal system, and culture of each country under consideration. These network organizations allow the authors to compare and contrast network forms in China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the United States according to features such as degrees of formalization, rule definition, and market conformance. The works collected here make an important contribution to a networks-markets- hierarchies framework that recognizes and emphasizes the diversity of organizational forms and behaviors. A unique resource for scholars and professionals in the fields of management and economics, this book enables a complex analysis of one of the world's fastest growing and most theoretically challenging regions.
Anthropological perspectives are not often represented in urban studies, even though many anthropologists have been contributing actively to theory and research on urban poverty, racism, globalization, and architecture. The New Urban Anthropology Reader corrects this omission by presenting 12 cross-cultural case studies focusing on the analysis of space and place. Five images of the city--the divided city, the contested city, the global city, the modernist city, and the postmodern city--serve as the framework for the selected essays. These images highlight current research trends in urban anthropology, such as poststructural studies of race, class, and gender in the urban context; political economic studies of transnational culture; and studies of the symbolic and social production of urban space and planning. Selected Chapters: Theorizing the City: An Introduction by Setha M. Low Part I. The Divided City The Changing Significance of Race and Class in an African American Community, Steven Gregory Fortified Enclaves: The New Urban Segregation by Teresa P. R. Caldeira Part II. The Contested City Spatializing Culture: The Social Production and Social Construction of Public Space in Costa Rica, Setha M. Low Part III. The Global City Wholesale Sushi: Culture and Commodity in Tokyo's Tsukiki Market, Ted Bestor Part IV. The Modernist City The Modernist City and the Death of the Street by James Holston Part V. The Postmodern City Spatial Discourse and Social Boundaries: Re-imagining the Toronto Waterfront by Matthew Cooper
The Encyclopedia of Japanese Business and Management is the definitive reference source for the exploration of Japanese business and management. Reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of this field, the Encyclopedia consolidates and contextualises the leading research and knowledge about the Japanese business system and Japanese management thought and practice. It will be welcomed by scholar and student alike as an essential resource for teaching, an invaluable companion to independent study, and a solid starting point for wider exploration.

Best Books