Discover unique attractions around the Great Lake State! Take a simple day trip, or string together a longer vacation of activities that catch your interest. No more information overload! Sections are divided by themes like waterfalls, lighthouses and fun days, so you can decide what to do and then figure out where to do it. No more information overload! Useful for singles, couples and families--visitors and residents alike--this guide by Mike Link encompasses a wide range of interests.
Explores ghosts and haunted places, local legends, cursed roads, crazy characters, and unusual roadside attractions found in Michigan.
Michigan Off the Beaten Path features the things travelers and locals want to see and experience––if only they knew about them. From the best in local dining to quirky cultural tidbits to hidden attractions, unique finds, and unusual locales, Michigan Off the Beaten Path takes the reader down the road less traveled and reveals a side of Michigan that other guidebooks just don't offer.
If one of life’s major quests is for balance, it’s no surprise that Traverse City keeps topping national “best” lists. Here, visitors and locals come for the life balance—the serenity offered by the lapping of waves along hundreds of miles of sandy beach, a dark sky just made for wishing upon stars, the simplicity of picking up dinner at a roadside farm stand or from a chef who got her start at one. There’s a balance, too, of the simple and the elevated, as local chefs get noticed on the national stage, wineries scoop up international competition awards, and galleries attract acclaimed artists. There’s an old legend claiming that a dip in the waters of the 45th parallel, which passes through the region, will cure all that ails you. Others think simply a visit with the right mindset and at least one beach bonfire before you go might do the same. Discover for yourself in 100 Things to Do in Traverse City Before You Die.
There’s more to Michigan than beautiful forests, shuttered factories, and miles and miles of stunning shoreline. Armed with this offbeat travel guide, you’ll soon discover the strange underbelly of the Great Lakes State. Michigan has monuments to fluoridation, snurfing, the designer of the Jefferson nickel, and the once-famous Mr. Chicken, as well as festivals honoring tulips, Christmas pickles, and a 38-acre fungus. It’s where you’ll find the World’s Largest Lugnut, the Nun Doll Museum, Joe’s Gizzard City, the Teenie-Weenie Pickle Barrel Cottage, Howdy Doody, and Thomas Edison’s last breath. The state also has its share of weird history—it’s where Harry Houdini perished on Halloween night in 1926, where skater Tanya Harding’s posse whacked Nancy Kerrigan, and where the Kellogg brothers invented popular breakfast cereals and less-popular yogurt enemas. Along with humorous histories and witty observations, Oddball Michigan provides addresses, websites, hours, fees, and driving directions for each of its 450 entries.
In 1993, the nation exploded into anti-same sex marriage fervor when the Hawaii Supreme Court issued its decision to support marriage equality for gay and lesbian couples. Opponents feared that all children, but especially those raised by lesbian or gay couples, would be harmed by the possibility of same-sex marriage, and warned of the consequences for society at large. Congress swiftly enacted the Defense of Marriage Act, defining marriage as between a man and a woman, and many states followed suit. Almost a decade before the Hawaii court issued its decision, however, several courts in multiple states had granted gay and lesbian couples co-parenting status, permitting each individual in the couple to be legally recognized as joint parents over their children. By 2006, advocates in half the states had secured court decisions supporting gay and lesbian co-parenting, and incurred far fewer public reprisals than on the marriage front. What accounts for the stark difference in reactions to two contemporaneous same-sex family policy fights? In Below the Radar, Alison Gash argues that advocacy visibility has played a significant role in determining whether advocacy efforts become mired in conflict or bypass hostile backlash politics. Same-sex parenting advocates are not alone in crafting low-visibility advocacy strategies to ward off opposition efforts. Those who operate, reside in, and advocate for group homes serving individuals with disabilities have also used below-the-radar strategies to diminish the damage cause by NIMBY ("not in my back yard") responses to their requests to move into single-family neighborhoods. Property owners have resorted to slander, subterfuge, or even arson to discourage group homes from locating in their neighborhoods, and for some advocates, secrecy provides the best elixir. Not every fight for civil rights grabs headlines, but sometimes, this is by design. Gash's groundbreaking analyses of these strategies provide a glimpse of the prophylactic and palliative potential of low-visibility advocacy.
Discover Michigan in a New Way Travel writer and Michigan native Paul Vachon shares his expert perspective on the Great Lakes State, guiding you on a memorable and unique experience. Whether you're hoping to go ice fishing, sample local fudge and wine, or explore Detroit's rhythmic roots and auto museums, Moon Michigan has activities for every traveler. With itineraries like “A Romantic Weekend on Mackinac Island” and “Historic Lighthouses,” expertly crafted maps, gorgeous photos, and Paul's trustworthy advice, Moon Michigan provides the tools for planning your perfect trip! Moon Michigan covers can't-miss sights and the best destinations including: Detroit The Thumb Ann Arbor and the Heartland Traverse City Mackinac Island Upper Peninsula Southwest Coast
"Historical account of the towns along the Old Chicago Road, now named US-12 from Detroit, Michigan to New Buffalo, Michigan"--Provided by publisher.
The Royal Chicano Air Force produced major works of visual art, poetry, prose, music, and performance during the second half of the twentieth century and first decades of the twenty-first. Materializing in Sacramento, California, in 1969 and established between 1970 and 1972, the RCAF helped redefine the meaning of artistic production and artwork to include community engagement projects such as breakfast programs, community art classes, and political and labor activism. The collective's work has contributed significantly both to Chicano/a civil rights activism and to Chicano/a art history, literature, and culture. Blending RCAF members' biographies and accounts of their artistic production with art historical, cultural, and literary scholarship, Flying under the Radar with the Royal Chicano Air Force is the first in-depth study of this vanguard Chicano/a arts collective and activist group. Ella Maria Diaz investigates how the RCAF questioned and countered conventions of Western art, from the canon taught in US institutions to Mexican national art history, while advancing a Chicano/a historical consciousness in the cultural borderlands. In particular, she demonstrates how women significantly contributed to the collective's output, navigating and challenging the overarching patriarchal cultural norms of the Chicano Movement and their manifestations in the RCAF. Diaz also shows how the RCAF's verbal and visual architecture—a literal and figurative construction of Chicano/a signs, symbols, and texts—established the groundwork for numerous theoretical interventions made by key scholars in the 1990s and the twenty-first century.
Touring Michigan's Upper Peninsula (U.P.) is like taking a two-week trip by station wagon. Not in terms of time—you can sample plenty if four days is all you have. It’s about stepping back and appreciating a place of raw scenic beauty dotted with roadside attractions, blinker-light towns, rustic cabins and hand-painted signs advertising smoked fish and homemade jam. With 100 Things to Do in the Upper Peninsula Before You Die, discover a land mostly surrounded by the Great Lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, linked to the state’s Mitten-shaped Lower Peninsula by a five-mile suspension bridge spanning the Straits of Mackinac. The U.P. surprises with Victorian-era and car-free Mackinac Island, millions of acres of forests, waterfalls, wildlife, remnants of the prosperous copper mining era, and 1,700 miles of spectacular shoreline. It’s home to about 311,000 hardy Yoopers (U.P.-ers), just 3% of Michigan’s population across a third of the state’s territory. Cell phone service can be spotty and the top speed along two-lane highways is 55 mph—all the better to slow down and embrace the U.P., whether you’re in search of extreme sports experiences, soft adventure or a simple slice of solitude.
The rise and fall of Michigan football by New York Times bestselling author, John U. Bacon
From the Stooges and MC to the White Stripes, Eminem, and Kid Rock, this account of rock in Detroit, which has always produced more subversive rock music than any city in the world, presents stories from the participants themselves.
"Under the Radar Michigan" is an Emmy award winning PBS television series that features the cool people, places and things that make Michigan a great place to live, work and play. If you're looking for awesome Michigan places to explore, vacation, eat, live, start a business or just kick backand relax, this book is for you. In this, our second installment, chapter by chapter we take you along with us on our 'next' fifty episodes. Get ready to discover cool Michigan cities, interesting people, incredible restaurants, romantic spaces and great places to vacation with the whole family. You'll climb to the top of the Mackinac Bridge; go cliff diving in Lake Superior; savor the flavor of fantastic foods; ride the North Pole Express; meander through magnificent museums; explore great parks, trails and places to camp; fish the great lakes; meet people making a difference and have unbelievable urban adventures. You won't believe what's right in your own backyard. So, once again, join us. I guarantee you'll learn so much about Michigan, you'll never want to leave. Grab this (and our first) book, collect your car keys and make this great state your next big adventure.
Looks at the cultural meanings of health, exploring it's ideologies, arguing that obtaining health is difficult because of cultural conventions, and offering ways to develop healthier options for one's body.
From Back Cover: This is a newspaperman's history of the Upper Peninsula. Intrigued by the place name Michigamme, Martin and his wife stopped there on their wedding trip in 1940 and became enchanted with the Upper Peninsula. Out of that attraction came more visits, a string of interviews and a series of tales told by miners, loggers, hunters and trappers. Originally published in 1944, it is a collection of nineteen lively stories told in convenient chunks for quick reading.-Detroit Free Press. The passage of time provides a better test of the quality of a book than litmus paper does of the acidity of a solution. This book was originally written in 1944 by one of our most powerful documentary authors. [Call it North Country] reads like a novel. If you're a history buff, it reads better than a novel. This book could not be written today. The witnesses to the development of upper Michigan would be missing and twice or thrice told tales would lose much detail and would not have the ring of truth which authenticates history.-Inland Seas.
Offers profiles of forty-one colleges that focus on individual needs and academic standards, provides tips for choosing a school based on personality, and discusses such topics as learning disabilities and single-sex education.
The Second World War might have officially ended in May 1945, but in reality it rumbled on for another ten years... The end of the Second World War in Europe is one of the twentieth century's most iconic moments. It is fondly remembered as a time when cheering crowds filled the streets, danced, drank and made love until the small hours. These images of victory and celebration are so strong in our minds that the period of anarchy and civil war that followed has been forgotten. Across Europe, landscapes had been ravaged, entire cities razed and more than thirty million people had been killed in the war. The institutions that we now take for granted - such as the police, the media, transport, local and national government - were either entirely absent or hopelessly compromised. Crime rates were soaring, economies collapsing, and the European population was hovering on the brink of starvation. In Savage Continent, Keith Lowe describes a continent still racked by violence, where large sections of the population had yet to accept that the war was over. Individuals, communities and sometimes whole nations sought vengeance for the wrongs that had been done to them during the war. Germans and collaborators everywhere were rounded up, tormented and summarily executed. Concentration camps were reopened and filled with new victims who were tortured and starved. Violent anti-Semitism was reborn, sparking murders and new pogroms across Europe. Massacres were an integral part of the chaos and in some places – particularly Greece, Yugoslavia and Poland, as well as parts of Italy and France – they led to brutal civil wars. In some of the greatest acts of ethnic cleansing the world has ever seen, tens of millions were expelled from their ancestral homelands, often with the implicit blessing of the Allied authorities. Savage Continent is the story of post WWII Europe, in all its ugly detail, from the end of the war right up until the establishment of an uneasy stability across Europe towards the end of the 1940s. Based principally on primary sources from a dozen countries, Savage Continent is a frightening and thrilling chronicle of a world gone mad, the standard history of post WWII Europe for years to come.
A landmark book by marine biologist Wallace J. Nichols on the remarkable effects of water on our health and well-being. Why are we drawn to the ocean each summer? Why does being near water set our minds and bodies at ease? In BLUE MIND, Wallace J. Nichols revolutionizes how we think about these questions, revealing the remarkable truth about the benefits of being in, on, under, or simply near water. Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with compelling personal stories from top athletes, leading scientists, military veterans, and gifted artists, he shows how proximity to water can improve performance, increase calm, diminish anxiety, and increase professional success. BLUE MIND not only illustrates the crucial importance of our connection to water-it provides a paradigm shifting "blueprint" for a better life on this Blue Marble we call home.
Michael Moore-Oscar-winning filmmaker, bestselling author, and the nation's official provocateur laureate-is back, this time taking on an entirely new role, that of his own meta-Forrest Gump. Smashing the autobiographical mold, Moore presents twenty-four far-ranging, irreverent, and stranger-than-fiction vignettes from his own early life. One moment he's an eleven-year-old boy lost in the U.S. Senate and found by Bobby Kennedy; and in the next, he's inside the Bitburg cemetery with a dazed and confused Ronald Reagan. Fast-forwarding to 2003, he stuns the world from the Oscar stage by uttering the words "We live in fictitious times . . . with a fictitious president" in place of the usual "I'd like to thank the Academy." And none of that even comes close to the night the friendly priest at the seminary decides to show him how to perform his own exorcism. Capturing the zeitgeist of the past fifty years, yet deeply personal and unflinchingly honest, HERE COMES TROUBLE takes readers on an unforgettable, take-no-prisoners ride through the life and times of Michael Moore. Alternately funny, eye-opening, and moving, it's the book he has been writing-and living-his entire life.

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