"During the past three decades, international legal expert Francis A. Boyle has dealt with some of the most difficult problems created by Britain's continued military occupation of six northeast counties in Ireland. In so doing, he along with other Irish Americans engaged the formidable Irish American domestic lobby in support of the Irish resistance. This book addresses some of the most important aspects of their historic campaigns--the struggle to prevent deportation of Irish freedom-fighter, Joe Doherty, the protest against the U.S.-U.K. Extradition Treaty of 2006, the effort to engage U.S. multinationals in implementing the MacBride Principles to roll back discrimination against Catholics in Northern Ireland. But most significantly, Boyle makes the legal case for viewing the horrific Irish 'Potato Famine'--the Irish Hecatomb--as a result, not of laissez-faire economic policy, but of intentional British genocide. This is the definitive book on all legal/political/human rights aspects of the Irish conflict, including Britain's international legal obligation to decolonize Northern Ireland and going forward, a legal and human rights framework for establishing a United Ireland where all Irish can live in peace with justice for all irrespective of their differences. United Ireland, Human Rights, and International Law is required reading for Irish Americans, people living in Ireland, and the Irish Diaspora around the world"--Provided by publisher.
Grundthese des Buches ist, dass ein Paradigmenwechsel stattgefunden hat, der den Menschen zum primaren Volkerrechtssubjekt macht. Diese These wird vor dem Hintergrund der Ideengeschichte und Dogmatik der Volkerrechtspersonlichkeit des Menschen entfaltet und auf die Rechtspraxis in zahlreichen Teilrechtsgebieten, angefangen vom Recht der internationalen Verantwortung uber das Recht des bewaffneten Konflikts, das Recht der Katastrophenhilfe, das internationale Strafrecht, das internationale Umweltrecht, das Konsularrecht und das Recht des diplomatischen Schutzes, das internationale Arbeitsrecht, das Fluchtlingsrecht bis hin zum internationalen Investitionsschutzrecht gestutzt. Der neue Volkerrechtsstatus des Menschen wird mit dem Begriff des subjektiven internationalen Rechts auf den Punkt gebracht.
A state of emergency has existed in Northern Ireland since 1922. Security forces have broad powers to stop and question people, to search their homes, to detain them without charges for as long as sevendays and to exclude them from Northern Ireland or Great Britain. The right to trial by jury has been suspended for offenses related to terrorism. Political violence is a daily occurrence, and death is commonplace; almost 2, 900 people have died in "The Troubles" since 1969.
Recent developments in Northern Ireland have correctly been described as historic. While the future of constitutional change is by no means certain,events merit close scrutiny. The Good Friday Agreement 1998 marked a significant departure from incrementalism and thus with the dominant logic of British constitutionalism. The Agreement is in essence a constitutional promise anchored in clear normative principles. Although several aspects of the Agreement are in operation there is no guarantee that this new form of constitutionalism will work. However, the foundations of the settlement are clear. The building blocks reflect a strong commitment to human rights, equality and democratic renewal which encompasses a multiplicity of overlapping relationships. This book examines several key aspects of this complex picture. Developments in Northern Ireland have attracted a large measure of international interest. Reflecting this the contributors demonstrate the links to current controversies in constitutional and human rights law scholarship. At a time when there is much consideration of constitutional change in the UK and beyond, the intention is to offer a collection that both describes the changing legal and political landscape in Northern Ireland and one which provides a significant contribution to current debates on constitutionalism.
and effectiveness in representing clients.
Hearing on a fair and thorough examination of human rights abuses in the north of Ireland. Witnesses: Martin O'Brien, Exec. Dir., Committee for the Admin. of Justice; Michael Posner, Exec. Dir., Lawyers Committee for Human Rights; Julia Hall, Northern Ireland Researcher, Human Rights Watch; Stephen Livingstone, Co-Dir., Univ. of Nottingham Human Rights Centre; Maryam Elahi, Amnesty Internat. USA; Michael Finucane, Pat Finucane Center; Jim Kelly, father of Sean Kelly; Brenda Downes, United Campaign Against Plastic Bullets; Edward Wallace, Ancient Order of Hibernians; and Mary Paglione, Ladies' Ancient Order of Hibernians.
This Handbook is the latest version of a book that was last published in 2003, and has been completely revised to take account of the innumerable legal developments since then. The book contains 26 chapters on topics ranging across the full spectrum of civil, political, social, economic and environmental rights, with particular emphasis on the right not to be discriminated against. It is currently the most comprehensive and practical publication on the state of human rights in Northern Ireland. This is a part of the world where, as well as ongoing issues arising out of the conflict ('emergency laws' are still in place, for example), there are familiar questions concerning the rights of people with poor mental health, the law relating to family and sexual matters, children's rights, education rights, employment rights, housing rights, and social security rights. The contributors to the book are all experts in their field, most of them with years of experience as human rights activists and advisers. The book provides precise information about relevant legislation and case law (on which there are tables) and is fully indexed.
This book provides the first comprehensive account of the role played by the European Convention on Human Rights during the conflict in Northern Ireland from 1968. Brice Dickson studies the effectiveness of the Convention in protecting human rights in a society wracked by terrorism and deep political conflict, detailing the numerous applications lodged at Strasbourg relating to the conflict and considering how they were dealt with by the enforcement bodies. The book illustrates the limitations inherent in the Convention system but also demonstrates how the European Commission and Court of Human Rights gradually developed a more interventionist approach to the applications emanating from Northern Ireland. In turn this allowed the Convention to become a more secure guarantor of basic rights and freedoms during times of extreme civil unrest and political turmoil elsewhere in Europe. The topics examined include the right to life, the right not to be ill-treated, the right to liberty, the right to a fair trial, the right to a private life, the right to freedom of belief, the right to freedom of expression, the right to freedom of assembly, and the right not to be discriminated against. The book argues that, while eventually the European Court did use the applications from Northern Ireland to establish important human rights principles, their development was slow and arduous and some gaps in protection still remain. The book illustrates the limits of the European Convention as a tool for protecting human rights in times of crisis.
The Irish Yearbook of International Law (IYIL) supports research into Ireland's practice in international affairs and foreign policy, filling a gap in existing legal scholarship and assisting in the dissemination of Irish policy and practice on matters of international law. On an annual basis, the Yearbook presents peer-reviewed academic articles and book reviews on general issues of international law. Designated correspondents provide reports on international law developments in Ireland, Irish practice in international bodies, Ireland and the law of the sea, and the law of the European Union as relevant to developments in Ireland. In addition, the Yearbook reproduces key documents that reflect Irish practice on contemporary issues of international law. This volume of the Yearbook includes a symposium issue on Brexit, Ireland and international law, bringing together leading academics exploring the international legal-political context of Brexit for Ireland.
The idea that international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law (IHRL) are complementary, rather than mutually exclusive regimes generated a paradigmatic shift in the international legal discourse. The reconciliation was driven by a humanistic ethos and its purpose was to offer greater protection of the rights to life, liberty and dignity of all individuals under all circumstances. The complementarity of both regimes currently enjoys the status of the new orthodoxy and simultaneously invites critical reflection. This collection of essays accepts the invitation, offering diverse assessments of the merits of taking human rights to the battlefields of the twenty-first century. The book comprises three parts: part I focuses on the paradigmatic (security based "armed conflict" vs. human rights centered "law enforcement" paradigms) and the normative complexities of the interaction between both regimes in the "fight against terror" and in other, allegedly new, types of wars. Part II discusses the interplay between IHRL and IHL in the context of three specific regimes: belligerent occupation; the European Court of Human Rights and the protection of cultural heritage. Part III explores the potential fusion of IHL and IHRL into a new paradigm in two areas: post-bellum accountability and compensation to victims of war crimes. The range of issues, multitude of competing norms and narratives, and shifting paradigms explored in this collection, converse with each other. This conversation mirrors the process through which international law - paying deference to political realities while simultaneously seeking to transcend them - charts new pathways to advance its humanizing project.
Incorporating HC 360-i and ii, session 2008-09
Year (1999 - 2000)
law?.
Terrorism and the Law offers a thoughtful and up-to-date discussion of the key materials on terrorism law. It provides comprehensive coverage of the major domestic, European, and international laws, and their impact on the UK. It also contains an extensive examination of the implementation of these laws, and of the practical issues raised.
Human Rights Law provides thorough coverage of human rights issues, offering a practical text for trainee solicitors and practitioners in Ireland. This fourth edition has been fully updated to cover recent developments in the field.
The Irish Yearbook of International Law is intended to stimulate further research into Ireland's practice in international affairs and foreign policy, filling a gap in existing legal scholarship and assisting in the dissemination of Irish thinking and practice on matters of international law. On an annual basis, the Yearbook presents peer-reviewed academic articles and book reviews on general issues of international law. Designated correspondents provide reports on international law developments in Ireland, Irish practice in international fora and the European Union, and the practice of joint North-South implementation bodies in Ireland. In addition, the Yearbook reproduces documents that reflect Irish practice on contemporary issues of international law. Publication of the Irish Yearbook of International Law makes Irish practice and opinio juris more readily available to Governments, academics and international bodies when determining the content of international law. In providing a forum for the documentation and analysis of North-South relations the Yearbook also make an important contribution to post-conflict and transitional justice studies internationally. As a matter of editorial policy, the Yearbook seeks to promote a multilateral approach to international affairs, reflecting and reinforcing Ireland's long-standing commitment to multilateralism as a core element of foreign policy.
This edited collection addresses some of the most important challenges in contemporary human rights law and practice. Its central theme is the linkage between public finance, particularly budget decisions, and the realisation (or not) of economic and social rights. While much academic and political debate on economic and social rights implementation has focused on the role of the courts, this work places the spotlight squarely on those organs of government that have the primary responsibility and the greatest capacity for giving effect to such rights: namely, the elected branches of government. The major actors considered in this book are politicians, public servants and civil society, with their role in realising economic and social rights the work's key focus. The book thus makes a crucial contribution to remedying the current imbalance in attention paid by economic and social rights scholars to the legislature and executive vis-a-vis the judiciary. Featuring pioneering work by leading experts in the field of human rights and public finance, this multidisciplinary collection will be of great interest to academics, practitioners, public servants and students working in the areas of law, human rights, economics, development and political science.
This book analyses the preventative confinement of suspected terrorists with regard to different models of counter-terrorism policy within the context of international human rights law. The book is written from a global perspective drawing on cases and practice from different jurisdictions including the US, the UK and Australia.
A collection of documents relating to the Kosovo crisis, plus introduction, chronology and index.

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