Murdock explores the role of imagination in the process of writing memoirs, and suggests various ways to write a memoir, employing her own memories and other memoirs to demonstrate certain writing techniques, and providing step-by-step instructions for novice memoir writers.
While many people see ‘home’ as the domestic sphere and place of belonging, it is hard to grasp its manifold implications, and even harder to provide a tidy definition of what it is. Over the past century, discussion of home and nation has been a highly complex matter, with broad political ramifications, including the realignment of nation-states and national boundaries. Against this backdrop, this book suggests that ‘home’ is constructed on the assumption that what it defines is constantly in flux and thus can never capture an objective perspective, an ultimate truth. Along these lines, Unreliable Truths offers a comparative literary approach to the construction of home and concomitant notions of uncertainty and unreliable narration in South Asian diasporic women’s literature from the UK, Australia, South Africa, the Caribbean, North America, and Canada. Writers discussed in detail include Feroza Jussawalla, Suneeta Peres da Costa, Meera Syal, Farida Karodia, Shani Mootoo, Shobha Dé, and Oonya Kempadoo. With its focus on transcultural homes, Unreliable Truths goes beyond discussions of diaspora from an established postcolonial point of view and contributes with its investigation of transcultural unreliable narration to the representation of a g/local South Asian diaspora.
Shapin explains how gentlemen-philosophers resolved varying testimony about such phemonema as comets, icebergs, and the pressure of water by bringing to bear practical social knowledge and standards of decorum. For instance, while "vulgar" divers reported they experienced no crushing pressure no matter how deep into the sea they dived, gentlemen-philosophers preferred the evidence of crushed pewter bottles. Shapin uses richly detailed historical narrative to make a powerful argument about the establishment of factual knowledge both in science and in everyday practice. Accounts of the mores and manners of gentlemen-philosophers illustrate Shapin's broad claim that trust is imperative for constituting every kind of knowledge. Knowledge-making is always a collective enterprise: people have to know whom to trust in order to know something about the natural world
In Truth Matters: Theory and Practice in Psychoanalysis , Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot draws philosophical investigations of truth into psychoanalysis with wide ranging implications for both theory and clinical practice. Her ‘truth axes’ offer a powerful tool for understanding the mental world as well as for improving psychotherapy.
Features more than three hundred thousand synonyms and ten thousand antonyms, as well as nearly two hundred collections of nouns to add detail to writing and quick guides to easily confused words.
An all-in-one reference providing convenience, value, and the authority of Oxford dictionaries. The Oxford American Desk Dictionary & Thesaurus Third Edition is the ideal all-in-one reference, with a dictionary and a thesaurus combined in one handy, integrated volume. A word's meanings, synonyms, and antonyms are given in the same entry, allowing the user access to all this information at a glance. The text is fully updated with the latest lexical content, informed by Oxford's extensive language research program, including the Oxford English Corpus, a unique electronic database of more than two billion words that allows us to offer the fullest, most accurate picture of the English language today. Hundreds of new words cover computing, ecology, technology, and many other subjects. The Dictionary & Thesaurus includes helpful extra features such as a center Reference section of essential ready reference. Within the text, usage tip boxes help users write more effective English. A completely redesigned interior lends an open, readable look that makes this reference accessible and easy to use. Find out more about our living language using Oxford Dictionaries Online - updated regularly with the latest changes to words and meanings, so you have the most accurate picture of English available. Use the thousands of audio pronunciations to hear how words are spoken. Improve your confidence in writing with helpful grammar and punctuation guides, full thesaurus information, style and usage help, and much more. Discover more on oxforddictionaries.com, Oxford's hub for dictionaries and language reference.
A classic work of American literature that has not stopped changing minds and lives since it burst onto the literary scene, The Things They Carried is a ground-breaking meditation on war, memory, imagination, and the redemptive power of storytelling. The Things They Carried depicts the men of Alpha Company: Jimmy Cross, Henry Dobbins, Rat Kiley, Mitchell Sanders, Norman Bowker, Kiowa, and the character Tim O’Brien, who has survived his tour in Vietnam to become a father and writer at the age of forty-three. Taught everywhere—from high school classrooms to graduate seminars in creative writing—it has become required reading for any American and continues to challenge readers in their perceptions of fact and fiction, war and peace, courage and fear and longing. The Things They Carried won France's prestigious Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize; it was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award.
Jennifer Harbury's investigation into torture began when her husband disappeared in Guatemala in 1992; she told the story of his torture and murder in Searching for Everardo. For over a decade since, Harbury has used her formidable legal, research, and organizing skills to press for the U.S. government's disclosure of America's involvement in harrowing abuses in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. A draft of this book had just been completed when the first photos from Abu Ghraib were published; tragically, many of Harbury's deepest fears about America's own abuses were graphically confirmed by those horrific images. This urgently needed book offers both well-documented evidence of the CIA's continuous involvement in torture tactics since the 1970s and moving personal testimony from many of the victims. Most important, Harbury provides solid, convincing arguments against the use of torture in any circumstances: not only because it is completely inconsistent with all the basic values Americans hold dear, but also because it has repeatedly proved to be ineffective: Again and again, "information" obtained through these gruesome tactics proves unreliable or false. Worse, the use of torture by U.S. client states, allies, and even by our own operatives, endangers our citizens and especially our troops deployed internationally.
If you have ever wished you could show children and teenagers how to enrich their lives with meditation and visualization, this book will delight you. It presents simple exercises in guided imagery designed to help young people ages three through eighteen to relax into learning, focus attention and increase concentration, stimulate creativity, and cultivate inner peace and group harmony. The use of guided imagery has been internationally recognized as an effective method of "whole brain" learning. The author's approach will have special appeal to parents and teachers who are frustrated by an educational system that seems to reward only those children who excel at verbal, linear learning. With the exercises in this book, young people can discover learning styles that are effective and enjoyable for them. These techniques of guided imagery offer adults as well as children a unique way to tap the wealth of creativity and wisdom within.
Monday Morning Memoirs is a dazzling collection of intimate stories written by ten remarkable women who first met in a creative writing class in the mid-nineties and have continued to write together ever since. This wildly different, yet amazingly similar group of women, aged forty-five to seventy-nine, have provided a unique view of the Second Half of Life across several generations. They have crafted their memories with exceptional compassion, humor, insight and attention to the cultural changes that have occurred in the last four decades. An introduction to each chapter describes the elements of memoir writing contained in each piece so that you can begin to write your life story too.
Growing awareness that the domination of writing and the printed book has been merely a phase in Western cultural history, a "Gutenberg hiatus" that is now coming to an end, has prompted increased scholarly interest in the oral cultures and subcultures that persisted alongside or within he literate/literary mainstream. This collection of studies by scholars from the University of Southern Denmark and distinguished guests from Europe and North America comprises six essays dealing directly with oral aspects of the verbal culture of classical and medieval Europe, from Homeric tradition, through Old English and Old Norse poetry, to late-medieval religious texts, together with two essays examining living oral traditions from more recent periods, Inuit storytelling and Turkic epics.
Revised and updated, this guide to the teaching of composition includes a new section of sources listing journals, books and other bibliographic resources.
Riotous and riveting, this is the story of a charming college professor who most definitely did not—but maybe did—kill his ex-wife. Or someone else. Or no one. Irby plays with the thriller trope in unimaginably clever ways. Edwin Stith, a failed novelist and college writing instructor in upstate New York, is returning home for the weekend to Richmond, Virginia, to celebrate his mother's wedding—to a much younger man. Edwin has a peculiar relationship with the truth. He is a liar who is brutally honest. He may or may not be sleeping with his students, he may or may not be getting fired, and he may or may not have killed his ex-wife, a lover, and his brand-new stepsister. Stith's dysfunctional homecoming leads him deep into a morass of long-gestating secrets and dangers, of old-flames still burning strong and new passions ready to consume everything he holds dear. But family dysfunction is only eclipsed by Edwin's own, leading to profound suspense and utter hilarity. Lee Irby has crafted a sizzling modern classic of dark urges, lies, and secrets that harks back to the unsettling obsessions of Edgar Allan Poe—with a masterful ending that will have you thinking for days.
List of homoeopathic physicians by states.
Ninth-grader Philip Malloy's suspension for humming "The Star-Spangled Banner" during homeroom becomes a national news story.
Intended primarily for courses required of graduate students teaching composition and upper-division students majoring in rhetoric, Composition in Four Keys introduces novice scholars to the literature of composition and rhetoric and helps them find patterns to make that literature intelligible.

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