Several encyclopedias overview the contemporary system of criminal justice in America, but full understanding of current social problems and contemporary strategies to deal with them can come only with clear appreciation of the historical underpinnings of those problems. Thus, this four-volume work surveys the history and philosophy of crime, punishment, and criminal justice institutions in America from colonial times to the present. It covers the whole of the criminal justice system, from crimes, law enforcement and policing, to courts, corrections and human services. Among other things, this encyclopedia will: explicate philosophical foundations underpinning our system of justice; chart changing patterns in criminal activity and subsequent effects on legal responses; identify major periods in the development of our system of criminal justice; and explore evolving debates and conflicts on how best to address issues of crime and punishment. Its signed entries provide the historical context for students to better understand contemporary criminological debates and the contemporary shape of the U.S. system of law and justice.
Managing Criminal Justice Organizations: An Introduction to Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition, covers the formal and informal nature of the organizations involved in criminal justice. Kania and Davis provide an introduction to the administration, organization, and management of criminal justice organizations. This management aspect is the key to ensuring the proper running of criminal justice agencies in their efforts to combat crime. The book begins by discussing the eight principles of public management: leading, organizing, deciding, evaluating, staffing, training, allocating, and reporting. It then describes management positions in criminal justice. These include police and law enforcement management; managing the prosecution of criminal suspects; managing bail, bond, and pretrial detention services; managing victim and witness services; managing the judicial system; and managing adult corrections. The remaining chapters cover the pioneers and predecessors of modern public service management theory; leadership in criminal justice; bureaucracies and organizational principles; decision making and planning; performance evaluation, appraisal , and assessment; staffing and personnel issues; training and education for criminal justice; allocation of organizational resources; information management and organizational communications; and future issues in criminal justice management. This text is suitable for introductory criminal justice management courses, preparing students to work in law enforcement, corrections, and the courts. The companion website offers case studies, test banks, lecture slides, and handouts, exercises and forms for use in class.
This unique, two-volume study examines female crime and the women who commit it.
Analyzes social aspects of prison, covering various theories about the role and function of punishment in society in the United States, including how the culture of imprisonment carries over into everyday life through television shows, movies, prison tourism, and other avenues, and examines the negative impact of penal spectatorship.
Organized Crime Biography: Paddy Whacked: The Untold Story of the Irish American Gangster; Organized Crime at the Movies: Blow; References to Chapter 2; 3 Characteristic Organized Crimes II: Infiltration of Business, Extortion, and Racketeering; Infiltration of Business and Government; Extortion; Protection Rackets; Jobs for Sale; Under Color of Official Right; Critical Thinking Exercise 3.1: The Case of Repaying a Loan; Racketeering; Hidden Ownership and Skimming Profits; I Didn't Know My Property Was a Crackhouse; The Secretive Nature of Criminal Enterprises
This concise book discusses a broad range of correctional issues and explores them using an engaging text/reader format. Ranging from super max facilities to inmate reentry, its precise coverage explains the interactions that exist in the area of correctional facilities from both a historical and a twenty-first century view. This new edition offers over ten new essays and features compelling contributions from leaders in the field. Selections cover various topics such as suicide, religion, technocorrections, the death penalty, women and minority prisoners, alternatives to incarceration and more, For individuals interested in or pursuing a career in corrections.
"Thinking about crime and justice in the twenty-first century conjures up an enormously ambitious agenda: an agenda that ranges from the globalization of crime and justice, transnational crime, new technologies, new criminal threats and the continued applicability of old-in some cases-18th century solutions in attempting to combat 21st century problems." - James O. Finckenauer, President, American Criminal Justice Society Courts dispense justice. The crime challenges that face us in the 21st century appear to be more serious than they were in previous centuries. The dimensions of the crime scene have changed. This fourth edition of Visions For Change: Crime and Justice in the Twenty-First Century, consisting of 36 chapters (new and updated) is a representation of all changes reflective in this new century. The law arena has had to adapt to the changes in this "new world" we live in relative to reducing the rights of our citizens to a certain extent. The review of all issues facing us since the acts of September 11, 2001 are examined with the most up-to-date research available. "It would be great to believe that equality exists for all, but that is not yet the case in this Twenty-First century. This work blends research with creativity in an outstanding attempt to shape a vision for the future, a vision that moves us beyond the status quo. The rhetoric alone will not change the system; new policies and plans of action are needed to renew today's visions for tomorrow." - Roslyn Muraskin, Long Island University
Topics covered include community policing, obscenity, pornography, public perceptions of crime and criminality, legal issues in policing, impact of international law on the U.S. Death Penalty, juvenile justice, technology and criminal justice, prison privatization, sentencing and life without parole, women in policing.
Criminology has experienced tremendous growth over the last few decades, evident, in part, by the widespread popularity and increased enrollment in criminology and criminal justice departments at the undergraduate and graduate levels across the U.S. and internationally. Evolutionary paradigmatic shift has accompanied this surge in definitional, disciplinary and pragmatic terms. Though long identified as a leading sociological specialty area, criminology has emerged as a stand-alone discipline in its own right, one that continues to grow and is clearly here to stay. Criminology, today, remains inherently theoretical but is also far more applied in focus and thus more connected to the academic and practitioner concerns of criminal justice and related professional service fields. Contemporary criminology is also increasingly interdisciplinary and thus features a broad variety of ideological orientations to and perspectives on the causes, effects and responses to crime. 21st Century Criminology: A Reference Handbook provides straightforward and definitive overviews of 100 key topics comprising traditional criminology and its modern outgrowths. The individual chapters have been designed to serve as a “first-look” reference source for most criminological inquires. Both connected to the sociological origins of criminology (i.e., theory and research methods) and the justice systems’ response to crime and related social problems, as well as coverage of major crime types, this two-volume set offers a comprehensive overview of the current state of criminology. From student term papers and masters theses to researchers commencing literature reviews, 21st Century Criminology is a ready source from which to quickly access authoritative knowledge on a range of key issues and topics central to contemporary criminology. This two-volume set in the SAGE 21st Century Reference Series is intended to provide undergraduate majors with an authoritative reference source that will serve their research needs with more detailed information than encyclopedia entries but not so much jargon, detail, or density as a journal article or research handbook chapter. 100 entries or "mini-chapters" highlight the most important topics, issues, questions, and debates any student obtaining a degree in this field ought to have mastered for effectiveness in the 21st century. Curricular-driven, chapters provide students with initial footholds on topics of interest in researching term papers, in preparing for GREs, in consulting to determine directions to take in pursuing a senior thesis, graduate degree, career, etc. Comprehensive in coverage, major sections include The Discipline of Criminology, Correlates of Crime, Theories of Crime & Justice, Measurement & Research, Types of Crime, and Crime & the Justice System. The contributor group is comprised of well-known figures and emerging young scholars who provide authoritative overviews coupled with insightful discussion that will quickly familiarize researchers, students, and general readers alike with fundamental and detailed information for each topic. Uniform chapter structure makes it easy for students to locate key information, with most chapters following a format of Introduction, Theory, Methods, Applications, Comparison, Future Directions, Summary, Bibliography & Suggestions for Further Reading, and Cross References. Availability in print and electronic formats provides students with convenient, easy access wherever they may be.
"Justice Blind? Ideals and Realities of American Criminal Justice" probes problems of injustice within our criminal laws, law enforcement agencies, courts, and correctional facilities. Posing important questions, showing different viewpoints, and offering fair solutions, author Matthew B. Robinson gives students a new and thought-provoking critique of the criminal justice system. "Justice Bind? Ideas and Realities of American Criminal Justice" is ideally suited for courses such as Introduction to Criminal Justice, CJ Ethics, Issues in CJ, Alternative Approaches to CJ, Introduction to Political Science, Criminology, Social Problems, and other courses where a more factual, honest interpretation of the system is required.
North America's obsession with the control of criminals has led to the expenditure of more than one hundred billion dollars per year on police, courts, and prisons. This criminal control industry has grown at the expense of strategies aimed at reducing crime. In The Criminal Justice System: Alternative Measures, nine outstanding critics of the crime control industry present alternatives to the existing criminal justice system. The main theme of the collection is that crime is a community problem, and that solutions to the occurrence of crime lie within the community. The collection is intended for sociologists, criminologists, social workers, and others who study the justice system or work within it.
This text aims to develop an understanding of crime and criminal justice by treating social structure and inequality as central themes in the study of crime. It gives attention to key sociological concepts such as poverty, gender, race, and ethnicity and demonstrates their influence on crime.
Designed to give a general overview of policing in our society, with a new chapter added to reflect the increasing emphasis on policing and homeland security.
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