Several encyclopedias overview the contemporary system of criminal justice in America, but full understanding of current social problems and contemporary strategies to deal with them can come only with clear appreciation of the historical underpinnings of those problems. Thus, this four-volume work surveys the history and philosophy of crime, punishment, and criminal justice institutions in America from colonial times to the present. It covers the whole of the criminal justice system, from crimes, law enforcement and policing, to courts, corrections and human services. Among other things, this encyclopedia will: explicate philosophical foundations underpinning our system of justice; chart changing patterns in criminal activity and subsequent effects on legal responses; identify major periods in the development of our system of criminal justice; and explore evolving debates and conflicts on how best to address issues of crime and punishment. Its signed entries provide the historical context for students to better understand contemporary criminological debates and the contemporary shape of the U.S. system of law and justice.
This collection of readings is a one-of-a-kind--examining current policies, practices and issues impacting the field of criminal justice today. Leaving no stone unturned, contributing authors (all leaders in the field) explore a wide range of topics such as gangs, gender and race, war on drugs, terrorism, crime victims, correctional issues and computer-based technologies. Linking the past, present, and future of criminal justice, the authors discuss the issues currently impacting the system, the challenges that lie ahead, and their visions for how these issues will be handled in the next century.
This book studies the formal and informal nature of the organizations involved in criminal justice. It will acquaint readers with the historical developments and application of managerial theories, principles, and problems of managing criminal justice organizations. Covers management positions in criminal justice, historical antecedents, decisionmaking and planning, staffing and personnel, training and education. Text complemented by learning objectives, important terms and names, photos, illustrations, tables and boxed inserts.
Analyzes social aspects of prison, covering various theories about the role and function of punishment in society in the United States, including how the culture of imprisonment carries over into everyday life through television shows, movies, prison tourism, and other avenues, and examines the negative impact of penal spectatorship.
Organized Crime Biography: Paddy Whacked: The Untold Story of the Irish American Gangster; Organized Crime at the Movies: Blow; References to Chapter 2; 3 Characteristic Organized Crimes II: Infiltration of Business, Extortion, and Racketeering; Infiltration of Business and Government; Extortion; Protection Rackets; Jobs for Sale; Under Color of Official Right; Critical Thinking Exercise 3.1: The Case of Repaying a Loan; Racketeering; Hidden Ownership and Skimming Profits; I Didn't Know My Property Was a Crackhouse; The Secretive Nature of Criminal Enterprises
This concise book discusses a broad range of correctional issues and explores them using an engaging text/reader format. Ranging from super max facilities to inmate reentry, its precise coverage explains the interactions that exist in the area of correctional facilities from both a historical and a twenty-first century view. This new edition offers over ten new essays and features compelling contributions from leaders in the field. Selections cover various topics such as suicide, religion, technocorrections, the death penalty, women and minority prisoners, alternatives to incarceration and more, For individuals interested in or pursuing a career in corrections.
The resurrection of former prisons as museums has caught the attention of tourists along with scholars interested in studying what is known as dark tourism. Unsurprisingly, due to their grim subject matter, prison museums tend to invert the “Disneyland” experience, becoming the antithesis of “the happiest place on earth.” In Escape to Prison, the culmination of years of international research, noted criminologist Michael Welch explores ten prison museums on six continents, examining the complex interplay between culture and punishment. From Alcatraz to the Argentine Penitentiary, museums constructed on the former locations of surveillance, torture, colonial control, and even rehabilitation tell unique tales about the economic, political, religious, and scientific roots of each site’s historical relationship to punishment.
Criminology has experienced tremendous growth over the last few decades, evident, in part, by the widespread popularity and increased enrollment in criminology and criminal justice departments at the undergraduate and graduate levels across the U.S. and internationally. Evolutionary paradigmatic shift has accompanied this surge in definitional, disciplinary and pragmatic terms. Though long identified as a leading sociological specialty area, criminology has emerged as a stand-alone discipline in its own right, one that continues to grow and is clearly here to stay. Criminology, today, remains inherently theoretical but is also far more applied in focus and thus more connected to the academic and practitioner concerns of criminal justice and related professional service fields. Contemporary criminology is also increasingly interdisciplinary and thus features a broad variety of ideological orientations to and perspectives on the causes, effects and responses to crime. 21st Century Criminology: A Reference Handbook provides straightforward and definitive overviews of 100 key topics comprising traditional criminology and its modern outgrowths. The individual chapters have been designed to serve as a “first-look” reference source for most criminological inquires. Both connected to the sociological origins of criminology (i.e., theory and research methods) and the justice systems’ response to crime and related social problems, as well as coverage of major crime types, this two-volume set offers a comprehensive overview of the current state of criminology. From student term papers and masters theses to researchers commencing literature reviews, 21st Century Criminology is a ready source from which to quickly access authoritative knowledge on a range of key issues and topics central to contemporary criminology. This two-volume set in the SAGE 21st Century Reference Series is intended to provide undergraduate majors with an authoritative reference source that will serve their research needs with more detailed information than encyclopedia entries but not so much jargon, detail, or density as a journal article or research handbook chapter. 100 entries or "mini-chapters" highlight the most important topics, issues, questions, and debates any student obtaining a degree in this field ought to have mastered for effectiveness in the 21st century. Curricular-driven, chapters provide students with initial footholds on topics of interest in researching term papers, in preparing for GREs, in consulting to determine directions to take in pursuing a senior thesis, graduate degree, career, etc. Comprehensive in coverage, major sections include The Discipline of Criminology, Correlates of Crime, Theories of Crime & Justice, Measurement & Research, Types of Crime, and Crime & the Justice System. The contributor group is comprised of well-known figures and emerging young scholars who provide authoritative overviews coupled with insightful discussion that will quickly familiarize researchers, students, and general readers alike with fundamental and detailed information for each topic. Uniform chapter structure makes it easy for students to locate key information, with most chapters following a format of Introduction, Theory, Methods, Applications, Comparison, Future Directions, Summary, Bibliography & Suggestions for Further Reading, and Cross References. Availability in print and electronic formats provides students with convenient, easy access wherever they may be.
The main driver of inequality—returns on capital that exceed the rate of economic growth—is again threatening to generate extreme discontent and undermine democratic values. Thomas Piketty’s findings in this ambitious, original, rigorous work will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.
"Justice Blind? Ideals and Realities of American Criminal Justice" probes problems of injustice within our criminal laws, law enforcement agencies, courts, and correctional facilities. Posing important questions, showing different viewpoints, and offering fair solutions, author Matthew B. Robinson gives students a new and thought-provoking critique of the criminal justice system. "Justice Bind? Ideas and Realities of American Criminal Justice" is ideally suited for courses such as Introduction to Criminal Justice, CJ Ethics, Issues in CJ, Alternative Approaches to CJ, Introduction to Political Science, Criminology, Social Problems, and other courses where a more factual, honest interpretation of the system is required.
A world dominated by America and driven by cheap oil, easy credit, and conspicuous consumption is unraveling before our eyes. In this powerful, deeply humanistic book, Grace Lee Boggs, a legendary figure in the struggle for justice in America, shrewdly assesses the current crisis—political, economical, and environmental—and shows how to create the radical social change we need to confront new realities. A vibrant, inspirational force, Boggs has participated in all of the twentieth century’s major social movements—for civil rights, women’s rights, workers’ rights, and more. She draws from seven decades of activist experience, and a rigorous commitment to critical thinking, to redefine "revolution" for our times. From her home in Detroit, she reveals how hope and creativity are overcoming despair and decay within the most devastated urban communities. Her book is a manifesto for creating alternative modes of work, politics, and human interaction that will collectively constitute the next American Revolution.
North America's obsession with the control of criminals has led to the expenditure of more than one hundred billion dollars per year on police, courts, and prisons. This criminal control industry has grown at the expense of strategies aimed at reducing crime. In The Criminal Justice System: Alternative Measures, nine outstanding critics of the crime control industry present alternatives to the existing criminal justice system. The main theme of the collection is that crime is a community problem, and that solutions to the occurrence of crime lie within the community. The collection is intended for sociologists, criminologists, social workers, and others who study the justice system or work within it.
This text aims to develop an understanding of crime and criminal justice by treating social structure and inequality as central themes in the study of crime. It gives attention to key sociological concepts such as poverty, gender, race, and ethnicity and demonstrates their influence on crime.
This is the eBook of the printed book and may not include any media, website access codes, or print supplements that may come packaged with the bound book. Criminal Justice, Fifth Edition, examines the themes of crime and justice to reveal their significant history, current facts, and modern trends, tracing them from the past to the present and into the future. This successful introductory text continues to focus on critical thinking and the media's influence on criminal justice and the public's perception of criminal justice. Albanese gives new attention to up-to-the-minute laws and policies related to crime, law, search and seizure, and operations of the criminal justice system, as well as coverage of issues of technology, including crimes facilitated by the Internet, identity theft, and international issues.
Reports on present and future achievements, goals, and challenges for the United Nations. Gives information and statistics on sustainable growth, combating HIV/AIDS, preventing deadly conflicts, and pursuing arms reductions. Looks at coping with climate change, preserving biodiversity, and building a new ethic of global stewardship, and discusses changes within the United Nations related to identifying strengths and making digital connections. Annan is Secretary-General of the United Nations. Lacks a subject index. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

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