The exchanges : at home and abroad -- Exchange operations : bringing order to the markets -- Playing fair : rules and regulations -- The big wheels : Wall Street professionals -- The money machines : bankers, economists and world trade -- The money makers : corporations at home and abroad -- Investors, big and small -- The industry guard dogs : regulators, enforcers and safety nets -- Economics for investors : the ups and downs of business the business cycle -- Economic indicators : taking the business cycle temperature -- The long and short of trends, cycles and crashes : market movement and the indexes that track them -- Stocks : owning a piece of something big -- Funds : letting a professional make the decisions -- Bonds : loaning corporations and governments money -- Options and futures : taking bigger chances -- Initial public offerings : the darling of the 90s -- Fundamental analysis : cheap or undervalued? -- Decoding financial statements : seeing beyond the numbers -- Equity valuations : it's all relative -- Bond valuations : all debt is not created equal -- Technical analysis : using the past to predict the future -- Charting : more than pretty pictures -- Tools that match your style : starting with the right broker -- Orders, quotes and fills : getting the price you want -- Recordkeeping and taxes : paying the piper -- Investor resources : getting help when you need it -- Acronyms : alphabet soup
Provides information on investment banking, covering the basics of financial markets, interviews, career paths, and job responsibilities.
Insider guidance to the modern world of investment banking today In Investment Banking Explained, Wharton professor and global financier Michel Fleuriet provides a complete overview of investment banking in its modern form; defines key terms; identifies structures, strategies, and operational aspects; and analyzes the strategy in each of the main functional areas of an investment bank.
Defines financial terms, explains investment strategies, and offers case studies demonstrating the application of investment concepts
Unravel the Mysteries of the Financial Markets—the Language, the Players, and the Strategies for Success Understanding money and investing has never been more important than it is today, as many of us are called upon to manage our own retirement planning, college savings funds, and health-care costs. Up-to-date and expertly written, The Wall Street Journal Complete Money and Investing Guidebook provides investors with a simple—but not simplistic—grounding in the world of finance. It breaks down the basics of how money and investing work, explaining: • What must-have information you need to invest in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds • How to see through the inscrutable theories and arcane jargon of financial insiders and advisers • What market players, investing strategies, and money and investing history you should know • Why individual investors should pay attention to the economy Written in a clear, engaging style by Dave Kansas, one of America’s top business journalists and editor of The Wall Street Journal Money & Investing section, this straightforward book is full of helpful charts, graphs, and illustrations and is an essential source for novice and experienced investors alike. Get your financial life in order with help from The Wall Street Journal. Look for: • The Wall Street Journal Complete Personal Finance Guidebook • The Wall Street Journal Personal Finance Workbook • The Wall Street Journal Complete Real Estate Investing Guidebook From the Trade Paperback edition.
A fully revised edition of the INVESTING CLASSIC For over 30 years this comprehensive, easy-to-read guide has served well as the definitive reference for successful investing. Now in its fifth edition and completely updated, Understanding Wall Street helps investors prosper in today’s challenging economy—whether you’re just beginning or among the millions soon to retire. Understanding Wall Street, Fifth Edition, has new sections and information on the issues most important to today’s investors, including: How to use the Internet as an investing tool The shift to exchange traded funds (ETFs) The link between Wall Street and Main Street The Risks and rewards of the global economy Praise for previous editions of Understanding Wall Street: “Recommended. An excellent introduction to stock market intricacies.” —Booklist “A lucid guide to those downtown mysteries.” —Newsday “Remarkable . . . it remains as useful as ever . . . Experience may be the best teacher, but this manual runs a close second.” American Library Book Review
Traces the history of money and discusses stocks, bonds, mutual funds, futures, and options.
Defines terms associated with investing, economics, accounting, finance, and banking.
Sometimes it’s not about WHO you know but WHAT you know . . . even on Wall Street SO, YOU WANT TO WORK ON WALL STREET. You’ve come to the right place. Filled with sample questions taken from actual interviews, How to Get a Job on Wall Street is like your own personal coach helping you land the job of your dreams. This nuts-and-bolts guide has no gimmicks or tricks. Instead, it shows you how to “wow” interviewers with nothing more than old-fashioned knowledge, confidence, and professionalism. Before you start sending out your résumé, learn everything you need to know about: THE ROLE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PLAY IN SOCIETY HOW TO READ BALANCE SHEETS AND INCOME STATEMENTS THE FOUR MAIN CONCEPTS OF FINANCE COMPANY VALUATION BASICS You’re about to enter a high-stakes business, and those who do the hiring take their job seriously—so you can’t just “wing it” on an interview. How to Get a Job on Wall Street provides everything you need to know, so you can deliver when it counts.
Make Better Financial Decisions - Understand Investment Terms This practical financial dictionary for Investment terms helps you understand and comprehend most common Investment lingo. It was written with an emphasis to quickly grasp the context without using jargon. Each of the 332 Investment terms is explained in detail and also gives practical examples. It is based on common usage as practiced by financial professionals. Compiled over the last 3 years from questions and feedback to financial articles published by the Wealth Building Course education program. The Intelligent Investor This book is useful if you are new to business and finance. It includes most Investment terms for businesses, investors and entrepreneurs. It also covers the lingo that was introduced in the financial crisis of 2008 until 2017. With the alphabetical order it makes it quick and easy to find what you are looking for. Financial Dictionary Series Additional financial dictionaries are available in this series. Please also check out: Accounting, Banking, Retirement, Corporate Finance, Economics, Laws & Regulations, Real Estate & Trading. Click on the author name to see them. Example: What are Corporate Bonds? Corporate bonds are debt securities that a company issues and sells to investors. Such corporate bonds are generally backed by the company's ability to repay the loan. This money is anticipated to result from successful operations in the future time periods. With some corporate bonds, the physical assets of a company can be offered as bond collateral to ease investors' minds and any concerns about repayment. Corporate bonds are also known as debt financing. These bonds provide a significant capital source for a great number of businesses. Other sources of capital for the companies include lines of credit, bank loans, and equity issues like stock shares. For a business to be capable of achieving coupon rates that are favorable to them by issuing their debt to members of the public, a corporation will have to provide a series of consistent earnings reports and to show considerable earnings potential. As a general rule, the better a corporation's quality of credit is believed to be, the simpler it is for them to offer debt at lower rates and float greater amounts of such debt. Such corporate bonds are always issued in $1,000 face value blocks. Practically all of them come with a standardized structure for coupon payments. Some corporate bonds include what is known as a call provision. These provisions permit the corporation that issues them to recall the bonds early if interest rates change significantly. Every call provision will be specific to the given bond. These types of corporate bonds are deemed to be of greater risk than are government issued bonds. Because of this perceived additional risk, the interest rates almost always turn out to be higher with corporate bonds. This is true for companies whose credit is rated as among the best. Regarding tax issues of corporate bonds, these are pretty straight forward. The majority of corporate bonds prove to be taxable, assuming that their terms are for longer than a single year. To avoid taxes until the end, some bonds come with zero coupons and redemption values that are high, meaning that taxes are deferred as capital gains until the end of the bond term. Such corporate debts that come due in under a year are generally referred to as commercial paper. Corporate bonds are commonly listed on the major exchanges and ECN's like MarketAxess and Bonds.com. Even though these bonds are carried on the major exchanges, their trading does not mostly take place on them... Note: This example description is shorted due to publish restrictions. Each term is explained with 600 words and more.
Doing Deals is an in-depth explanation of the unique management style of investment banks. Represented are insights drawn from 17 U.S. investment banks, 21 issuing customers, and 10 European financial institutions.
Financial Terms Plain and Simple Explained This practical financial glossary helps you understand and comprehend common financial terms. It was written with an emphasis to quickly grasp the context without using jargon. It is based on common usage as practiced by financial professionals. Compiled over the last 3 years from questions and feedback to financial articles published by the Wealth Building Course education program. This book is useful if you are new to business and finance. It also includes most financial terms for investors and entrepreneurs. It also covers the lingo that was introduced in the financial crisis of 2008 until now. The following is an example term taken from the book to give you an idea about the writing style. Debasing the Currency Debasing the currency refers to the all too common historical process of lowering a currency’s actual value. In the past, this phrase commonly came to be associated with commodity money made principally from either silver or gold. Should the sum total of silver, gold, nickel, or copper be reduced, then the physical money is called debased. Even venerable institutions like the Roman Empire, with a thousand year history of growth and stability, have stooped to such debasing of the currency. Reasons that a government chooses to debase the currency in this way center around the financial benefits that the government is able to reap. These are done at the citizenry’s expense though. Governments that lowered the quantity of gold and silver in their coinage found that they could quietly mint more coins from a given fixed quantity of metal on hand. The downside to this for the general population centers on the inflation that this in turn causes. Such inflation is yet another benefit for the currency debasing government that then finds that it can pay off government debt or repudiate government bonds easier. The populace’s purchasing power is significantly reduced as a result of this, along with their then lowered standard of living. Debasing a currency lowers the value of the currency in question. Given enough time and abuse by the governing authorities, this debasing can even lead to a collapse in the existing currency that causes a newer currency or coinage to be created and launched for the nation or state. In present day times, debasing the currency is accomplished in more subtle means. Since currencies these days are made of only paper, involving no metal, debasing the currency simply involves printing additional paper dollars. With the advent of electronic banking, even this printing press operation is no longer required. The government simply creates money on a computer screen, literally conjuring it out of thin air. They are able to accomplish this in one of two ways. One way that they do this is via the Federal Reserve, which buys treasury securities by simply crediting the receivers’ bank accounts with electronically created money. The Federal Reserve then has tangible assets in Treasury bills that is it able to trade or sell when it wishes. Another way that this creation of money that debases the currency is able to be performed is through the Fractional Reserve Banking System. Since the Federal Reserve only requires banks to keep a ten percent reserve ratio of deposits on hand, these banks when they are credited funds from the Federal Reserve are able to loan this new money out in multiples that are equivalent to the leverage created by this ten percent only reserve ratio. In both of these ways, the Federal Reserve is able to create more money quietly and at will. This is how modern day debasing of the currency is effectively accomplished.
A practical guide to the inside language of the world of derivative instruments and risk management Financial engineering is where technology and quantitative analysis meet on Wall Street to solve risk problems and find investment opportunities. It evolved out of options pricing, and, at this time, is primarily focused on derivatives since they are the most difficult instruments to price and are also the riskiest. Not only is financial engineering a relatively new field, but by its nature, it continues to grow and develop. This unique dictionary explains and clarifies for financial professionals the important terms, concepts, and sometimes arcane language of this increasingly influential world of high finance and potentially high profits. John F. Marshall (New York, NY) is a Managing Partner of Marshall, Tucker & Associates, a New York-based financial engineering and consulting firm. Former Executive Director of then International Association of Financial Engineers, Marshall is the author of several books, including Understanding Swaps.
Lenders and prospective home buyers alike have turned their attention to financial news, carefully watching the market since the 2007 housing and credit crisis. Recently, mortgage rates continued to drop to historic lows, changing on a daily basis. With their fluctuating rates and the current economic climate, mortgages are as complicated as ever. Anyone interested in acquiring a mortgage, refinancing a current mortgage, or starting a business career in lending has probably heard financial professionals use unfamiliar terms. But, with a little help from this comprehensive dictionary, you can easily converse with professionals and understand industry jargon. The Complete Dictionary of Mortgage & Lending Terms Explained Simply explains all the important financial terms you will encounter as you navigate the mortgage market. With easy-to-understand definitions, this dictionary covers everything from accrued interest to wraparound mortgages. It covers types of mortgages, parts of loan agreements, types of insurance, and even home-inspection terms. This resource uses simple language to describe the many concepts it covers, ensuring that even those without any financial or real estate experience will understand the definitions. With more than 1,800 terms, this dictionary allows you to understand almost every term you come across during your encounter with the lending process, whether you are researching the difference between trusts and liens or examining a prospective home s features. In addition to outlining terms associated with lending, it also includes information about important legislative acts and federal agencies that affect financing. The handy A-to-Z organization allows you to quickly find any information you need, even during nerve-wracking negotiations. The definitions also include any abbreviated forms of the terms, so you will be able to tell your ARMs (adjustable-rate mortgages) from your REITs (real estate investment trusts). This guide defines the players, the problems, the process, and the procedures. Whether you are looking to buy a home, trying to refinance, taking a finance class, or simply curious about the mortgage and lending industry, this dictionary is an indispensable guide to the many terms, tools, and agreements you will encounter at every step of the complex lending process. Atlantic Publishing is a small, independent publishing company based in Ocala, Florida. Founded over twenty years ago in the company president s garage, Atlantic Publishing has grown to become a renowned resource for non-fiction books. Today, over 450 titles are in print covering subjects such as small business, healthy living, management, finance, careers, and real estate. Atlantic Publishing prides itself on producing award winning, high-quality manuals that give readers up-to-date, pertinent information, real-world examples, and case studies with expert advice. Every book has resources, contact information, and web sites of the products or companies discussed.
With the immediacy of today’s NASDAQ close and the timeless power of a Greek tragedy, The Quants is at once a masterpiece of explanatory journalism, a gripping tale of ambition and hubris, and an ominous warning about Wall Street’s future. In March of 2006, four of the world’s richest men sipped champagne in an opulent New York hotel. They were preparing to compete in a poker tournament with million-dollar stakes, but those numbers meant nothing to them. They were accustomed to risking billions. On that night, these four men and their cohorts were the new kings of Wall Street. Muller, Griffin, Asness, and Weinstein were among the best and brightest of a new breed, the quants. Over the prior twenty years, this species of math whiz--technocrats who make billions not with gut calls or fundamental analysis but with formulas and high-speed computers--had usurped the testosterone-fueled, kill-or-be-killed risk-takers who’d long been the alpha males the world’s largest casino. The quants helped create a digitized money-trading machine that could shift billions around the globe with the click of a mouse. Few realized, though, that in creating this unprecedented machine, men like Muller, Griffin, Asness and Weinstein had sowed the seeds for history’s greatest financial disaster. Drawing on unprecedented access to these four number-crunching titans, The Quants tells the inside story of what they thought and felt in the days and weeks when they helplessly watched much of their net worth vaporize--and wondered just how their mind-bending formulas and genius-level IQ’s had led them so wrong, so fast.
This fact-filled guide serves as an introductory handbook or as a refresher for those who want to research a specific topic or update their research skills. • Annotated list of sources • An appendix listing core items in business
Argues that a randomly selected portfolio of stocks will do as well or better than those selected by a financial expert, and describes successful investment strategies
Acclaim for Joel Greenblatt's New York Times bestseller THE LITTLE BOOK THAT BEATS THE MARKET "One of the best, clearest guides to value investing out there." —Wall Street Journal "Simply perfect. One of the most important investment books of the last fifty years!" —Michael Price "A landmark book-a stunningly simple and low-risk way to significantly beat the market!" —Michael Steinhardt, the dean of Wall Street hedge-fund managers "The best book on the subject in years." —Financial Times "The best thing about this book-from which I intend to steal liberally for the next edition of The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need-is that most people won't believe it. . . . That's good, because the more people who know about a good thing, the more expensive that thing ordinarily becomes. . . ." —Andrew Tobias, author of The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need "This book is the finest simple distillation of modern value investing principles ever written. It should be mandatory reading for all serious investors from the fourth grade on up." —Professor Bruce Greenwald, director of the Heilbrunn Center for Graham and Dodd Investing, Columbia Business School
In the dizzying world of investment opportunities, finding a successful personal strategy is a daunting task. But the more you can understand yourself, the better chance you will have finding something that works for you. In Wall Street Smarts, author Miles Goodwin presents a remarkable compilation and review of some of today's best books for individual investors. Important works, such as The Art of Speculation by Philip Carret, Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits by Philip Fisher, The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham, A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton G. Malkiel, and The Nature of Risk, Stock Market Survival and the Meaning of Life by Justin Mamis, provide profound wisdom and insight to enable you to learn how to successfully invest your own money. In addition, the book contains a risk tolerance quiz designed by Dr. J. E. Grable of the University of Georgia and Dr. R. H. Lytton of Virginia Tech University, Professors of Financial Planning, to help you learn how your "inner investor" shapes your investment decisions. Divided into twelve easy-to-understand chapters, this remarkable resource compiles the best information from these books and breaks down a host of investment fundamentals and strategies, providing a comprehensive look at the various concepts you need to understand to be successful. So if you want to learn more about investing and how to handle your money yourself, crack open this book, dive in, and discover what works best for you! If you have never discussed finances and Wall Street with your children, this book is a great starting point.
The Practical Guide to Wall Street is an indispensable resource for anyone who aspires to a front-office sales or trading position on Wall Street and an essential desk reference for market practitioners and those who interact with this exciting but widely misunderstood industry. Written by an experienced trader in a clear, conversational style and assuming no previous background in finance, The Practical Guide to Wall Street provides a thorough schooling in the core curriculum of the equity and equity derivatives sales and trading business - exactly what you would learn from sitting beside the traders at a tier-one Wall Street investment bank (except that in practice, traders rarely have time to provide such detailed explanations!) Topics covered include: Clear, detailed and intuitive explanations of all major products, their function, pricing and risks (several of which are unavailable anywhere else despite producing billions of dollars in annual revenue for Wall St.) The layout of the trading floor, the roles and responsibilities of the different sales and trading groups and how they interact to service the client business An overview of the structure of the macro-economy and the trader’s perspective on the significance of economic data releases and their impact on the financial markets A review of those concepts from fundamental valuation and financial statement analysis of greatest relevance on the trading floor (as opposed to abstract valuation models) Practical details of the structure and functioning of the equity and derivative markets including translations of trader jargon, Bloomberg tips, market conventions, liquidity and risk considerations and much more… This book provides the first comprehensive explanation of all aspects of the functioning of the equities division, with information, details and insights previously only available to those who already worked on a trading floor. The availability of this material in a format accessible to non-professionals fundamentally changes the level of industry knowledge employers in the financial services industry can expect of new hires.

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