This book is about how water managers in the United States are responding to the call for increased effort to achieve sustainable supplies of clean fresh water for present and future generations. The author, himself a participant in the water supply chain, demonstrates that while water is indeed one of life’s most essential commodities, in many parts of the United States it is one of the most stressed resources. Throughout the book the author illustrates both the good and the bad efforts taken or not taken by water and wastewater management with real life examples. This book will appeal to the educators, students, volunteers, elected officials, regulators, and other participants with a role in helping the suppliers of water and wastewater services to achieve their goals providing clean, safe water on a sustainable basis.
This book addresses the enormous global challenge of providing balanced and sustainable solutions to urgent water problems. The author explores our dependence on access to safe water and other water-related services and how driving forces of the human and natural worlds are degrading this access. The greatest challenges involve conflicts between people and interest groups across all countries, as well as the economic and political difficulties in finding solutions through infrastructure development. The book takes an interdisciplinary approach to Integrated Water Resources Management or IWRM, which provides a set of tools for policy development, planning and organization, assessment, systems analysis, finance, and regulation. The author suggests that IWRM is challenging because of the human element, but that no other process can reconcile the conflicting agendas involved with water management. The broad range of topics covered here, as well as 25 case summaries, will be of interest to scientists, engineers, practitioners, and advanced level students interested in the integrated management of water as a resource.
Through case studies, from both developed and developing countries in five continents, this title illustrates how better water management, guided by the IWRM approach, has helped to meet a wide range of sustainable development goals.
8.8 Estimation of stream discharge
Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) has become the international label for the ‘new approach’ to water resources management. This volume, and in fact the entire series, investigates how this global concept resonates with regional, national and local concerns in South Asia. This is the first volume in a new series under the aegis of the South Asia Consortium for Interdisciplinary Water Resources Studies (SaciWATERs) and explains the IWRM. This volume begins by tracking the emergence of IWRM as a central notion in water debates. It then discusses the European experience with IWRM in the context of the European Water Framework Directive—the most comprehensive attempt so far at an IWRM-based water governance and management system. Thereafter, the book turns to South Asia. Among other things, the contributors argue that: - in South Asia, IWRM is a concept in search of a constituency, and not a concept that has emerged from regional or local practice; - understanding and implementing IWRM requires interdisciplinary analysis and frameworks; - IWRM is a ‘boundary’ concept—plastic enough to adapt to local needs and the constraints of several parties employing it, yet robust enough to maintain a common identity across sites; - there are issues and limits in transplanting the model of river basin organizations, a central thrust within the global IWRM discourse; and — a focus on water alone may be misguided, and that IWRM should look intensely at land-water linkages.
The impacts of human-induced climate change are largely mediated by water, such as alterations in precipitation and glacial melt patterns, variations in river flow, increased occurrence of droughts and floods, and sea level rise in densely populated coastal areas. Such phenomena impact both urban and rural communities in developed, emerging, and developing countries. Taking a systems approach, this book analyzes evidence from 26 countries and identifies common barriers and bridges for local adaptation to climate change through water resources management. It includes a global set of case studies from places experiencing increased environmental and social pressure due to population growth, development and migration, including in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North and South America. All chapters consider the crosscutting themes of adaptive capacity, equity, and sustainability. These point to resilient water allocation policies and practices that are capable of protecting social and environmental interests, whilst ensuring the efficient use of an often-scarce resource.
The vocabulary and discourse of water resource management have expanded vastly in recent years to include an array of new concepts and terminology, such as water security, water productivity, virtual water and water governance. While the new conceptual lenses may generate insights that improve responses to the world’s water challenges, their practical use is often encumbered by ambiguity and confusion. This book applies critical scrutiny to a prominent set of new but widely used terms, in order to clarify their meanings and improve the basis on which we identify and tackle the world’s water challenges. More specifically, the book takes stock of what several of the more prominent new terms mean, reviews variation in interpretation, explores how they are measured, and discusses their respective added value. It makes many implicit differences between terms explicit and aids understanding and use of these terms by both students and professionals. At the same time, it does not ignore the legitimately contested nature of some concepts. Further, the book enables greater precision on the interpretational options for the various terms, and for the value that they add to water policy and its implementation.
Sustainable Water Resources Management presents the most current thinking on the environmental, social, and political dimensions of sustainably managing the water supply at local, regional, or basin levels.
Water is an increasingly critical issue at the forefront of global policy change, management and planning. There are growing concerns about water as a renewable resource, its availability for a wide range of users, aquatic ecosystem health, and global issues relating to climate change, water security, water trading and water ethics. This handbook provides the most comprehensive reference ever published on water resource issues. It brings together multiple disciplines to understand and help resolve problems of water quality and scarcity from a global perspective. Its case studies and 'foundation' chapters will be greatly valued by students, researchers and professionals involved in water resources, hydrology, governance and public policy, law, economics, geography and environmental studies.
Addressing the techno-socio-economic challenges involved in the protection, conservation, recycling and equitable utilization of water as an economic good, this text explores the linkages and dynamics of interactions involving water, and includes the following key topic areas: dynamics of interactions involving water; water quality; augmentation and conservation of water resources; wastewater reuse systems; use of water in agriculture; industrial and municipal uses of water; water pollution; economics and management of water supplies; etiology of water-related diseases; climate change impacts on water resources and paradigms of water resource management.
The size and number of water projects and other development activities which influence the hydrological cycle have reached such proportions that the majority of problems involved extend beyond the boundaries of the traditional disciplines of hydraulics, hydrochemistry, hydrology and hydrogeology. New scientific methods for the solution of the contemporary problems in water management include analogy, operation research, system analysis and cybernetics. The distinctive features of these methods are their emphasis on measurement and on the use of conceptual models described in quantitative terms, the verification of their theoretical predictions, and their awareness that concepts are conditional and subject to growth and continuous change. This new approach should be defined within the framework of water resources management, i.e. within a complex of activities whose objective is the optimum utilization of water resources with regard to their quality and availability and the requirements of society. These water management activities should at the same time also ensure an optimum living environment, above all through protection of water resources against deterioration and exhaustion as well as through the protection of society against the harmful effects of water. In the course of these activities water resources management should avail itself of the entire spectrum of explicit sciences, gradually coming to form the sphere of its own theory. This monograph deals with the fundamental interdisciplinary problems of this complex sphere, an understanding of which is indispensable for successful water resources management in the widest sense of its social functions and environmental consequences. Thus, a common basis is provided for the mutual understanding of specialists from different backgrounds.
Droughts have formed an inseparable part of South Asian history and culture, with tragic consequences for a region that houses the greatest number of the world’s poor. However, this volume challenges the popular conception of drought, which is presented as an absolute shortage-scarcity with respect to an implicit understanding of the sufficiency of water. It highlights the fact that while available water supplies may be a given quantum, droughts are differentially experienced, politically inspired and socially constituted. It emphasises that the relative water scarcity needs to be appreciated, and argues that water scarcity means different things for diverse constituencies of water users. Policy prescriptions based on definitional premises will be flawed, as a misrepresentation of drought as merely water scarcity serves a political agenda. The editors and contributors of this volume critically evaluate the concept of drought, the way it is defined, its origin/derivation, and the purposes/interests it serves. This book is broadly divided into three major sections: the thematic section, country overviews, and case studies. Through these, it attempts to: - Understand the concept of drought. - Map diversity in drought situations across South Asia. - Identify responses to drought. - Outline viable options for more integrated approaches to drought policies and mitigation strategies. - Initiate a process of dialogue on a more comprehensive public policy for drought management. Comprehensive, thought-provoking, informative, and featuring new research data, this collection will provide policy makers and professionals with the opportunity to discuss and debate policies for sustainable livelihood support systems and drought management. It would also be an invaluable source of information for students and teachers working in the fields of Water and Natural Resource Management, Environmental Planning, Agricultural Economics, Rural Development, Public Policy and Public Administration.
Covering the more recent advances in Modelling, Planning, Management and Negotiations for Integrated Water Resource Management, this text brings together knowledge and concepts from Hydrology, System Analysis, Control Theory, Conflict Resolution, and Decision and Negotiation Theory. Without compromising on mathematical rigour, the book maintains a fine line between theory and application, methodology and tools, avoiding getting locked into excessively theoretical and formal development of the issues discussed. The non-technical aspects of water resource systems (such as societal, political and legal concerns) are recognized throughout the book as having a great, if not fundamental, importance to reaching an agreed-upon decision; they are therefore integrated into the more technical and mathematical issues. The book provides a unified, coordinated and comprehensive framework that will facilitate the increasingly appropriate application of the Integrated Water Resource Management paradigm by current and future practising professionals, decision-makers and scientists. · Integration of technical modelling and control aspects with participatory and decision-making issues · Insightful and comprehensive treatment of theoretical contents, supported by practical examples · A wide collection of exercises and project examples based on real-world case studies (with complete solutions)
As water scarcities increase, nations throughout the world are in search of better institutions to manage water resources. India has been making substantial efforts to develop its water management systems since independence and significant increases in irrigated agriculture have taken place through both public and private initiatives. However, scarcities are increasing and major problems presently confront the management of water resources and irrigated agriculture. Resolving these problems is crucial for the future. The main purpose of this book is to provide a new approach for the analysis and design of water institutions that govern the use and development of water resources, particularly for agriculture which is the largest user. Drawing on the theory of New Institutional Economics and comparisons with Australia (as a developed country) and other less developed nations in Africa and Asia, the authors present original empirical data from three Indian states. Detailed analysis of these data is used to identify and recommend attributes and features of water management institutions that are conducive to effective resource management, its long-term success, and its best contribution to development.
The Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) paradigm has been worldwide recognized as the only feasible way currently available to ensure a sustainable perspective in planning and managing water resource systems. It is the inspiring principle of the Water Framework Directive, adopted by the European Union in 2000, as well as the main reference for all the water related activity of UNESCO in the third world countries. However, very often, real world attempts of implementing IWRM fail for the lack of a systematic approach and the inadequacy of tools and techniques adopted to address the intrinsically complex nature of water systems. This book explores recent and important contributions of System Analysis and Control Theory to the technical application of such paradigm and to the improvement of its theoretical basis. Its prior aim is to demonstrate how the modelling and computational difficulties posed by this paradigm might be significantly reduced by strengthening the efficiency of the solution techniques, instead of weakening the integration requirements. The first introductory chapter provides the reader with a logical map of the book, by formalizing the IWRM paradigm in a nine-step decisional procedure and by identifying the points where the contribution of System Analysis and Control Theory is more useful. The book is then organized in three sections whose chapters analyze some theoretical and mathematical aspects of these contributions or presents design applications. The outstanding research issues on the border between System Analysis and IWRM is depicted in the last chapter, where a pull of scientists and experts, coordinated by Prof. Tony Jakeman describe the foreseeable scenario. The book is based on the most outstanding contributions to the IFAC workshop on Modelling and Control for Participatory Planning and Managing Water Systems held in Venice, September 28- October 1, 2004. That workshop has been conceived and organized with the explicit purpose of producing this book: the maximum length of the papers was unusually long (of the size of a book chapter) and only five long oral presentations were planned each day, thus allowing for a very useful and constructive discussion. Contributions from the leading world specialists of the field Integration of technical modelling aspects and participatory decision-making Good compromise between theory and application
"The integrated approach used in this book will be beneficial to water industry professionals who need to understand the complex details of today's water resource systems and to deal with the numerous economic, legal, and regulatory factors of importance to both the public and private sectors."--Cover.
The revised edition of Charles J. Meyers et al. Water Resource Management, 3rd ed., 1988. This edition places a greater emphasis on statutory systems than in prior editions, and the materials have been bolstered on public interest issues under state and federal laws. New cases have been added and significant new developments are captured by the addition of relevant textual material, notes of recent legislative activity, and scholarly commentary. The earlier editions' national orientation has been broadened, reflecting the fact that water issues are not limited to the West's perceived scarcity. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
With reference to India; contributed articles presented at a seminar.
Multidisciplinary papers giving the historical perspective, state of the art, and future research needed in the areas of supply, uses, wastes, impact assessment, policy development and decision making.

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