Weather Watcher's Logbook Makes a great gift for the weatherperson in your life Space for over 400 daily entries. Record morning, noon and evening readings of temperature, wind, rain and more.
Marine Mammals Ashore: A Field Guide for Strandings (J.R. Geraci & V.J. Lounsbury)in the hardcover formatis back! A comprehensive manual for understanding and dealing with a stranded seal, manatee, dolphin, whale, or sea otter, this book contains information for the interested beach dweller or student and for the scientist or marine resource manager. Marine Mammals Ashore describes rescue operations, how to organize a response team, and how to deal with the media and the public. It includes basic information on marine mammal biology, life history, and health, and an extensive bibliography.Marine Mammals Ashore also provides stranding network participants with practical guidelines for collecting data and specimens to better understand the biology and behavior of marine animals and the condition of their environment.All chapters have been updated and expanded, with emphasis on topics that include: enhancing network organization, public education, and media relations. natural and human-related mortality in each major marine mammal group. recognizing, responding to, and investigating unusual mortality events. new or updated protocols for specimen and data collection (e.g., samples for PCR analysis; basic guidelines for investigating possible noise-related strandings; collecting environmental data and samples; and a detailed protocol for examining marine mammals for signs of human interactions). zoonoses and other public health issues. updated overview of marine mammal stranding frequency and distribution in North America, with coverage extended to Canada and Mexico. overview of special topics provided by invited authors: disentanglement (Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, Santa Barbara CA); tagging and monitoring (Anthony Martin, British Antarctic Survey); and GIS applications (Greg Early, A.I.S., Inc., New Bedford, MA). close to 600 new references (and a few new carcass disposal stories!).The 372-page second edition features water- and tear-resistant paper, a vinyl cover, and durable plastic coil binding. There are even strategically placed lined pages for adding personal notes and contact information.
Along with the fine art of queuing and proper tea, talking about the weather is the essence of Britishness. We’re all a little bit obsessed by it. Will it snow this Christmas? Was this year really the warmest on record? And where on earth did ‘raining cats and dogs’ come from? According to recent research, 94% of British people admit to having discussed the weather in the past six hours, while 38% say they have in the past 60 minutes. Since Records Began is an almanac, a miscellany, and a celebration of our most famous obsession. Including beautiful illustrations, maps and line drawings, Since Records Began is a perfect gift for the cloudspotter in your life. Features include: - The Lore of Weather – myths, legends and old wives tales about the weather. - Lost in Translation – Colloquial names for weather around the country, from Custard Winds to Mizzle. - Extreme Weather – Bizarre events in the history of British Weather including red rain and a downpour of frogs and fish. - Plus tables showing record breaking sunshine, wind speed, rainfall, heat etc.
If you came upon an overturned truck on the highway that was leaking, would you be able to identify if it was hazardous and know what steps to take? Does the identification number 60 indicate a toxic substance or a flammable solid, in the molten state at an elevated temperature? Does the identification number 1035 indicate ethane or butane? What is the difference between natural gas transmission pipelines and natural gas distribution pipelines? Questions like these and more are answered in the 2016 update of the Emergency Response Guidebook. Learn how to identify symbols for vehicles carrying toxic, flammable, explosive, radioactive, or otherwise harmful substances and how to respond once an incident involving those substances has been identified. Always be prepared in situations that are unfamiliar and dangerous and know how to rectify them. Keeping this guide around at all times will ensure that, if you were to come upon a transportation situation involving hazardous substances or dangerous goods, you will be able to help keep others and yourself out of danger. With color-coded pages for quick and easy reference, this is the official manual used by first responders in the United States and Canada for transportation incidents involving dangerous goods or hazardous materials.
Available electronically in an open-access, full-text edition from the Texas A&M University Libraries' Digital Repository at http : / /hdl .handle .net /1969 .1 /146844. Frank N. McMillan Jr., a country boy steeped in the traditional culture of rural Texas, was summoned to a life-long quest for meaning by a dream lion he met in the night. On his journey, he followed the lead of the founder of analytical psychology, Carl Jung, and eventually established the world’s first professorship to advance the study of that field. McMillan, born and raised on a ranch near Calvert, was an Aggie through and through, with degrees in geology and petroleum engineering. As an adult working near Bay City, Texas, he was lunching in a country café when by chance he met abstract expressionist painter Forrest Bess, who was ecstatically waving a letter he had received from Jung himself. The artist’s enthusiastic description of Jung as a master psychologist, soul doctor, and healer led McMillan to the Jung Center in Houston, where he began reading Jung’s Collected Works. McMillan frequently said, “Jung saved my life.” Finding Jung: Frank N. McMillan Jr., a Life in Quest of the Lion captures McMillan’s journey through the words of his own journals and through reflections by his son, Frank III. David Rosen, the holder of the first endowed McMillan professorship at Texas A&M University, adds insights to the book, and the late Sir Laurens van der Post, whom the elder McMillan met at the Houston Jung Center in 1979, authored a foreword to the book before his death. This is a story that sheds light on the inner workings of the self as well as the Jungian understanding of the Self. In often lyrical language, it gives the human background to a major undertaking in the dissemination of Jungian scholarship and provides a personal account of a life lived in near-mythic dimensions.
Introductory Statistics is designed for the one-semester, introduction to statistics course and is geared toward students majoring in fields other than math or engineering. This text assumes students have been exposed to intermediate algebra, and it focuses on the applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it. The foundation of this textbook is Collaborative Statistics, by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean. Additional topics, examples, and ample opportunities for practice have been added to each chapter. The development choices for this textbook were made with the guidance of many faculty members who are deeply involved in teaching this course. These choices led to innovations in art, terminology, and practical applications, all with a goal of increasing relevance and accessibility for students. We strove to make the discipline meaningful, so that students can draw from it a working knowledge that will enrich their future studies and help them make sense of the world around them. Coverage and Scope Chapter 1 Sampling and Data Chapter 2 Descriptive Statistics Chapter 3 Probability Topics Chapter 4 Discrete Random Variables Chapter 5 Continuous Random Variables Chapter 6 The Normal Distribution Chapter 7 The Central Limit Theorem Chapter 8 Confidence Intervals Chapter 9 Hypothesis Testing with One Sample Chapter 10 Hypothesis Testing with Two Samples Chapter 11 The Chi-Square Distribution Chapter 12 Linear Regression and Correlation Chapter 13 F Distribution and One-Way ANOVA
These two volumes, published in 1883, document the doomed Polar expedition of George W. De Long (1844-81). Compiled by his wife from his journals and the testimony of the survivors, Volume 2 records the ship's wreckage, the crew's escape in smaller boats, and the discovery of De Long's remains.
One Man's Wilderness, written by Sam Keith from the journals of Proenneke, is a re-released classic that first captivated readers twenty-six years ago. First published in 1973, the book chronicles Proenneke's experiences during the first sixteen months (May, 1968 to September, 1969) of his odyssey.
This practical sourcebook has been specially prepared to give you an at-a-glance guide to quality video program-making on a modest budget. Emphasis throughout is on excellence with economy; whether you are working alone or with a small multi-camera group. The well-tried techniques detailed here will steer you through the hazards of production, helping you to avoid those frustrating, time-wasting problems, and to create an effective video program. For many years Video Production Handbook has helped students and program-makers in a wide range of organizations. Now in its thoroughly revised 3rd edition, Video Production Handbook guides you step-by-step, explaining how to develop your initial program ideas, and build them into a successful working format. It covers the techniques of persuasive camerawork, successful lighting and sound treatment, video editing...etc. You will find straightforward up-to-the-minute guidance with your daily production problems, and a wealth of practical tips based on the author's personal experience. In this extended edition, you will see how you can use quite modest chromakey facilities and visual effects to create the magic of virtual reality surroundings. Gerald Millerson's internationally acclaimed writings are based on a long and distinguished career with the BBC. His lecturing background includes TV production courses in the United States and UK. His other books for Focal Press have become standard works in a number of languages, and include his classic course text Television Production 13th ed, Effective TV Production 3rd ed, Video Camera Techniques 2nd ed, Lighting for TV and Film 3rd ed, Lighting for Video 3rd ed and TV Scenic Design.
This teaching guide covers the identification, deterioration, and conservation of artifacts made from plant materials. Detailed information on plant anatomy, morphology, and development, focusing on information useful to the conservator in identifying plant fibers are described, as well as the processing, construction, and decorative techniques commonly used in such artifacts. A final chapter provides a thorough discussion of conservation, preservation, storage, and restoration methods. This is a valuable resource to conservators and students alike.
In his meticulous notes on the natural history of Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau records the first open flowers of highbush blueberry on May 11, 1853. If he were to look for the first blueberry flowers in Concord today, mid-May would be too late. In the 160 years since Thoreau’s writings, warming temperatures have pushed blueberry flowering three weeks earlier, and in 2012, following a winter and spring of record-breaking warmth, blueberries began flowering on April 1—six weeks earlier than in Thoreau’s time. The climate around Thoreau’s beloved Walden Pond is changing, with visible ecological consequences. In Walden Warming, Richard B. Primack uses Thoreau and Walden, icons of the conservation movement, to track the effects of a warming climate on Concord’s plants and animals. Under the attentive eyes of Primack, the notes that Thoreau made years ago are transformed from charming observations into scientific data sets. Primack finds that many wildflower species that Thoreau observed—including familiar groups such as irises, asters, and lilies—have declined in abundance or have disappeared from Concord. Primack also describes how warming temperatures have altered other aspects of Thoreau’s Concord, from the dates when ice departs from Walden Pond in late winter, to the arrival of birds in the spring, to the populations of fish, salamanders, and butterflies that live in the woodlands, river meadows, and ponds. Primack demonstrates that climate change is already here, and it is affecting not just Walden Pond but many other places in Concord and the surrounding region. Although we need to continue pressuring our political leaders to take action, Primack urges us each to heed the advice Thoreau offers in Walden: to “live simply and wisely.” In the process, we can each minimize our own contributions to our warming climate.
Pioneering a new niche in the study of plants and animals in their natural habitat, this book allows readers to peer over the shoulders and into the notebooks of a dozen eminent field workers, to study firsthand their observational methods, materials, and fleeting impressions.
Aquaponics is the integration of aquaculture and soilless culture in a closed production system. This manual details aquaponics for small-scale production--predominantly for home use. It is divided into nine chapters and seven annexes, with each chapter dedicated to an individual module of aquaponics. The target audience for this manual is agriculture extension agents, regional fisheries officers, non-governmental organizations, community organizers, government ministers, companies and singles worldwide. The intention is to bring a general understanding of aquaponics to people who previously may have only known about one aspect.
From the sparrow to the starling, the woodpecker to the warbler, the eagle to the egret, and every species in between, birds are some of the most plentiful and most diverse creatures in North America. Soaring high above us, these winged beauties have long been a source of fascination and enchantment. While dozens of studies and field guides have been written, few provide a better-rounded overview of the denizens of the sky than Frank Michler Chapman’s Bird Life. First published in 1897, over a century later Bird Life stills provides insightful observations about dozens of species of birds native to North America. A pioneer in the study of natural history and ornithology, Frank Chapman writes with scientific prowess and an expert’s eye in regards to bird anatomy, migratory patterns, mating habits, and habitat choice. Describing species from across the continent, Bird Life is a true testament to one of the nation’s most beloved creatures.
The Aviation Instructor's Handbook was developed by the FAA in order to help beginning ground instructors, flight instructors, and aviation maintenance instructors understand the basics of flight instruction. This handbook provides aviation instructors with up-to-date information on learning and teaching, and how to relate this information to the task of teaching aeronautical knowledge and skills to students. Experienced aviation instructors will also find the updated information useful for improving their effectiveness in training activities.
Originally published in 2001. From the foreword: "In February 1999, only a few weeks before the U.S. Air Force spearheaded NATO's Allied Force air campaign against Serbia, Col. C. R. Anderegg, USAF (Ret.), visited the commander of the U.S. Air Forces in Europe. Colonel Anderegg had known Gen. John Jumper since they had served together as jet forward air controllers in Southeast Asia nearly thirty years earlier. From the vantage point of 1999, they looked back to the day in February 1970, when they first controlled a laser-guided bomb strike. In this book Anderegg takes us from "glimmers of hope" like that one through other major improvements in the Air Force that came between the Vietnam War and the Gulf War. Always central in Anderegg's account of those changes are the people who made them. This is a very personal book by an officer who participated in the transformation he describes so vividly. Much of his story revolves around the Fighter Weapons School at Nellis Air Force Base (AFB), Nevada, where he served two tours as an instructor pilot specializing in guided munitions. But he also takes a look at other "Fighter Mafia" outposts in the Pentagon and elsewhere. Readers meet young Mafiosi like John Jumper, Larry Keith, Ron Keys, Joe Bob Phillips, Earl Henderson, Moody Suter, John Corder, Jim Brown, John Vickery, Jack Lefforge, Jack Ihle, Stump Bowen, Dave Dellwardt, Tommy Dyches, John Madden, and Dick Myers. As one might expect to find in a fighter pilot story, there is a lot of fun along the way. For a distilled example, consult the appendix on "Jeremiah Weed" (replete with instructions for drinking "afterburners"). Colonel Anderegg's book is likely to please anyone with an interest in fighter pilots and how they molded today's Air Force.
DO WILDLIFE DISEASES REALLY MATTER? The waterfowl manager who wakes up one morning to find ten thousand dead and dying birds in the marsh would think so. Yet virtually every wild bird and mammal harbors at least a few parasites seemingly without obvious adverse consequences. Parasites, viruses, bacteria, and fungi are component parts of the ecosystems in which wildlife are found, but do not necessarily cause disease. Millennia of coevolution have engendered a modus vivendi that assures the survival of both host and parasite populations. Then why the ten thousand sick and dying birds? Ecosystems are changing. Waterfowl are concentrated on shrinking wetlands and remain there for longer periods of time, facilitating bird-to-bird spread of the bacteria that cause avian cholera. Or permitting the buildup of parasites in their hosts from a small, relatively benign number to massive numbers that cause disease and death. Water quality of wetlands changes, favoring the production of deadly botulinum toxin by bacteria and its mobilization up the food chain to waterfowl. New, totally artificial habitats are created with unpredictable results. The extreme temperature, salinity, and other conditions of the Salton Sea have created an unusual ecosystem in which botulism occurs in fish and in birds through biological cycles that are not yet understood. Wetland loss in southern California leaves few alternative places for waterbirds to go, so they are attracted to the Salton Sea. Behavior changes. Mallard ducks take up residence on the ponds and lakes of city parks and lose their migratory habits. They share these bodies of water with exotic species, such as Muscovy ducks that have also taken up residence there after introduction by people, setting the scene for outbreaks of duck plague, and creating the risk of spread to migratory waterfowl that also use these areas. Raccoons and skunks become well adapted to urban life, bringing rabies and canine distemper with them into the city. The environment changes the physiology of wild animals. Human activity introduces into wildlife habitats chemical compounds that adversely affect physiological processes such as reproduction and immune responsiveness. These compounds become incorporated into the ecosystems, often becoming more concentrated as they move up food chains. Their effects can influence wildlife populations. Some of these endocrine-disrupting chemicals, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons (DDE, PCBs), interfere with normal endocrine function by mimicking natural hormones, with resulting eggshell thinning and breakage. Effects of these chemical compounds on immune-system responses to infectious and parasitic agents are less well understood. What to do? Incorporating disease-prevention measures into wildlife management practices requires more information than is usually available. The information-gathering process must begin in the field. Field biologists must monitor disease occurrence. This Field Manual is a valuable aid in identifying the diseases that are likely to be present, and in giving guidance on the gathering and treatment of specimens needed to establish the diagnosis in the laboratory. But the wildlife field biologist is in a position to provide valuable information that goes beyond the collection of samples from sick and dead individuals. Although diseased individuals are the basic unit of surveillance, the occurrence of disease must be put into ecological perspective. A careful description of the ecological setting in which the disease is occurring, and any changes that have occurred over time, are ultimately as important as a careful description of the lesions observed in the individual, if the epidemiology of that disease is to be understood, and the disease prevented through sound wildlife-management practices.

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