As teachers around the world deal with the challenges of inclusive education, they must find effective ways of enhancing their classroom teaching methods. What Really Works in Special and Inclusive Education presents teachers with a range of evidence-based strategies they can immediately put into practice in their classrooms. This unique book will be an invaluable resource for educators who may not have the time or the inclination to engage with theory-heavy research, but who wish to ensure that their teaching strategies are up-to-the-minute and proven to be the most effective best practices. Each of the 27 strategies that this book comprises has a substantial research base, a strong theoretical rationale and clear guidelines on their implementation, as well as cautionary advice where necessary. In this new second edition, David Mitchell, a leading writer in special and inclusive education, continues to break new ground with revised and updated strategies based on evidence from the most recent studies in the field. From the myriad of related research available, only those studies with genuine potential for improving the practices of teachers and schools have been included, with the aim of facilitating high-quality learning and social outcomes for all learners in schools. Updates to this new edition include: four new chapters, on response to intervention, universal design for learning, inter-agency cooperation and one on the Finnish education system over 350 new references an even wider international focus, including evidence drawn from Asia references to recent developments in neuroscience a new companion website, with extra case studies, links to further reading, journal articles and videos, and an interactive quiz, at www.routledge.com/cw/mitchell This book will be essential reading for anyone with a vocational or academic interest in evidence-based special educational needs teaching strategies, whether a student in initial teacher education or a qualified classroom teacher, teacher educator, educational psychologist, special needs coordinator, parent, consultant or researcher. David Mitchell is an Adjunct Professor in the College of Education, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, and a consultant in inclusive education. ‘This is the book I wish I had written, synthesizing an enormous literature focused on special needs students. It is robust, it is readable, and it is your right-hand resource. A stunner of a book.’ –Professor John Hattie, University of Melbourne, author of Visible Learning
Diversities in Education is a challenging text that will help educators, teacher educators and trainee teachers to be more effective in teaching a range of diverse learners. It covers five major categories of difference: sex and gender; social class and socio-economic status; race, ethnicity and culture; beliefs and religion; and different abilities and asks the urgent questions all policy-makers, educators and students should consider: Why should we value diversity and human rights? How can inclusive education accommodate diversity? How do society’s aspirations for cohesion and harmony impact on people who are different? What meanings are given to differences, culturally and historically? Should educators seek to accentuate, eliminate, reduce or ignore differences? By drawing attention to the latest research into the most effective educational policies and practices, this insightful book suggests strategies for meeting the challenges being posed in an era of superdiversity. It’s a crucial read for any training or practising educator who wants to address the issue of diversity, learn effective ways to reach all learners and create more inclusive and harmonious societies.
Your desk reference for success with exceptional students As education trends promote the inclusion of students with special needs, this book is the perfect resource for teachers and administrators who need to know what works…and what doesn’t. With personal experiences, references, and reproducibles, this book identifies evidence-based practices in an easy-access format. The editors and authors examine how special educational needs affect: Content areas like reading and math Specialization areas like autism and learning disabilities Pedagogical areas like culturally responsive practices and accommodations Other critical areas like legal issues, behavior challenges, and home-school collaboration
This book reconceptualizes social studies teaching and learning in ways that will help prepare students to live in "new times" – prepared for new forms of labor in the post-industrial economy, equipped to handle new and emerging technologies and function in the new media age, and prepared to understand different perspectives to participate in an increasingly diverse, multicultural global society. Mark Baildon and James Damico offer an integrated theoretical framework and corresponding set of web-based technology tools to guide a reconceptualized social studies education and provide concrete examples of teachers and students wrestling with core challenges involved in doing inquiry-based investigations with web-based texts. The authors also lay out a range of suggestions for social studies and literacy teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and researchers interested in enacting and researching social studies as new literacies for living in the global society in the 21st century.
Educators today face two major challenges. The first, is to develop an education system which meets the needs of an ever more diverse student population. The second, is to successfully implement such a system. This requires nothing less than a revolutionary transformation of current approaches taken to education. Drawing on research-based evidence and offering over 70 concrete strategies to help educators respond to these challenges, this unique book provides a blueprint for an education system which will recognize the rights of all students, while engendering social cohesion and an equitable society. Broadening the scope of inclusive education, the author presents an ecological model – a system which places children at its centre and acknowledges the impacts of school, community, bureaucracy and society, to maximize opportunities for learning, and see students achieve the same levels of attainment, regardless of their gender, socio-economic status, ethnicity, religious beliefs or disability. A timely book which addresses the concerns of teachers and educators around the globe, The Ecology of Inclusive Education will give its readers the knowledge and confidence they require to meet the needs of each and every learner.
Governments, local authorities, school leaders, and teachers all over the world want to improve the educational attainment and participation of all students, and to minimise any systematic differences in outcomes for social and economic groups. A particular concern is for those students from backgrounds that may objectively disadvantage them at school and beyond. However, considerable effort and money is currently being wasted on policies, practices and interventions that have very little hope of success, and that may indeed endanger the progress that is being made otherwise. The poor quality of much education research evidence, coupled with an unwillingness among users of evidence to discriminate appropriately between what we know and do not know, means that opportunities are being missed. At a time of reduced public spending it is important that proposed interventions are both effective and efficient. Overcoming Disadvantage in Education is unique in the way that it: Shows where the solutions to underachievement and poverty lie combines primary(new), secondary (official) and published (review) evidence distinguishes between those possible causes of underachievement that are largely fixed for individuals, and those that are modifiable. There are evidence-informed ways forward in handling under-achievement and increasing social justice in education. This book shows which the more likely approaches are, and where further work could yield further benefits. This book will be a key text for students, developing academic researchers and supervisors in the social sciences, and for those research users charged with improving educational outcomes.
Mathematics Education offers both undergraduates and starting-graduate students in education an introduction to the connections that exist between mathematics and a critical orientation to education. This primer shows how concepts like race, class, gender, and language have real effects in the mathematics classroom, and prepares current and future mathematics teachers with a more critical math education that increases accessibility for all students. By refocusing math learning towards the goals of democracy and social and environmental crises, the book also introduces readers to broader contemporary school policy and reform debates and struggles. Mark Wolfmeyer shows future and current teachers how critical mathematics education can be put into practice with concrete strategies and examples in both formal and informal educational settings. With opportunities for readers to engage in deeper discussion through suggested activities, Mathematics Education’s pedagogical features include: Study Questions for Teachers and Students Text Boxes with Examples of Critical Education in Practice Annotated List of Further Readings Glossary
What does learning look like? What are different subjects really about? Why are transferable skills so important? How can we overcome the difficulties that children encounter in their learning? And what questions and prompts are likely to prove useful in helping children to get the most out of their lessons? The over-arching role of Teaching Assistants is to support teaching and learning in schools. To do this effectively, they need to understand the curriculum content of all the subjects in which they provide support and know what learning outcomes are sought. This accessible book provides an overview of the knowledge, skills, understanding and attitudes that children learn in each subject in their primary years. Written with the non-subject specialist in mind, and drawing on research and best practice in the classroom, this extremely practical book aims to provide the reader with the information they need to: deliver focused lessons to individual pupils, groups, or the whole class; concentrate on the most important elements when making classroom resources; make valuable assessments of the children’s learning, and keep useful records of their achievements, progress and difficulties; take a full part in discussions with colleagues – selecting objectives, devising interesting activities and delivering exciting lessons in each of the subjects. Including a wide range of examples and activities, this book will prove an invaluable companion for all students working on STLS and Foundation Degree courses, and Teaching Assistants currently working in primary schools.
What does inclusion really mean and what impact have inclusive approaches to education had on practice? Bringing together issues of theory, research, policy and practice from both the countries of the South and the North, this ground-breaking book provides a critical discussion of recent developments in the field of inclusive education. The authors consider developments, both in current thinking about the meaning of inclusion and in terms of policies and practices, in the context of education systems across the world and their differences and inter-relatedness. Topics covered include the increasing pressure on educators to develop a global policy agenda for inclusive education, the individual needs of children, the illusion of inclusivity and the importance of local contexts in determining policy. The book's international perspective illuminates common successes, failures and concerns. With case studies from Europe, the Caribbean and Australasia, the book also features chapter summaries, questions to facilitate critical thinking and discussion, case studies and suggestions for further reading. An essential read for anyone studying inclusive education, special educational needs, disability studies, social policy and international and comparative education, this book will ignite debate and enable the reader to develop a deep understanding of the issues. Ann Cheryl Armstrong is the Director of the Division of Professional Learning, Derrick Armstrong is Acting Deputy Vice Chancellor (Education) and Professor of Education and Ilektra Spandagou is a Lecturer in Inclusive Education. They are all based at the University of Sydney, Australia.
The core assumption of this book is the interconnectedness of humans and nature, and that the future of the planet depends on humans’ recognition and care for this interconnectedness. This comprehensive resource supports the work of pre-service and practicing elementary teachers as they teach their students to be part of the world as engaged citizens, advocates for social and ecological justice. Challenging readers to more explicitly address current environmental issues with students in their classrooms, the book presents a diverse set of topics from a variety of perspectives. Its broad social/cultural perspective emphasizes that social and ecological justice are interrelated. Coverage includes descriptions of environmental education pedagogies such as nature-based experiences and place-based studies; peace-education practices; children doing environmental activism; and teachers supporting children emotionally in times of climate disruption and tumult. The pedagogies described invite student engagement and action in the public sphere. Children are represented as ‘agents of change’ engaged in social and environmental issues and problems through their actions both local and global.
Research-based practical strategies for every teacher This book compiles the advice of experts who not only understand the research behind certain educational practices, but also have experience working in elementary classrooms. Each user-friendly chapter, focused on a topic vital to elementary educators, presents information in a straightforward way to help you learn what works – and what doesn't – with students today. Whether you’re a new educator, or just seeking to build new skills, you’ll benefit from: Insight into a handful of innovative topics in instruction, including using technology, UDL, co-teaching, and assessment Novel approaches to classroom management and strategies to engage students Useful reproducibles and resources for every topic area
Strategic Management of Human Capital in Education offers a comprehensive and strategic approach to address what has become labeled as "talent and human capital." Grounded in extensive research and examples of leading edge districts, this book shows how the entire human resource system in schools—from recruitment, to selection/placement, induction, professional development, performance management and evaluation, compensation, and career progression—can be reformed and restructured to boost teacher and principal effectiveness in ways that dramatically improve instructional practice and student learning. Strategic Management of Human Capital in Education guides educators towards putting more effective teachers, teacher leaders, and principals in the country’s schools—especially in poverty-impacted urban and rural communities—equipping those teacher and principals with instructional and leadership expertise, and rewarding and retaining those who are successful in attaining these objectives. Drawing from cases, experiences, and deliberations from a national task force, this book outlines a comprehensive framework for how to transform current human resource management practices into authentic, strategic talent management systems in order to improve student achievement.
‘Tom Bennett is the voice of the modern teacher.’ - Stephen Drew, Senior Vice-Principal, Passmores Academy, UK, featured on Channel 4’s Educating Essex Do the findings from educational science ever really improve the day-to-day practice of classroom teachers? Education is awash with theories about how pupils best learn and teachers best teach, most often propped up with the inevitable research that ‘proves’ the case in point. But what can teachers do to find the proof within the pudding, and how can this actually help them on wet Wednesday afternoon?. Drawing from a wide range of recent and popular education theories and strategies, Tom Bennett highlights how much of what we think we know in schools hasn’t been ‘proven’ in any meaningful sense at all. He inspires teachers to decide for themselves what good and bad education really is, empowering them as professionals and raising their confidence in the classroom and the staffroom alike. Readers are encouraged to question and reflect on issues such as: the most common ideas in modern education and where these ideas were born the crisis in research right now how research is commissioned and used by the people who make policy in the UK and beyond the provenance of education research: who instigates it, who writes it, and how to spot when a claim is based on evidence and when it isn’t the different way that data can be analysed what happens to the research conclusions once they escape the laboratory. Controversial, erudite and yet unremittingly entertaining, Tom includes practical suggestions for the classroom throughout. This book will be an ally to every teacher who’s been handed an instruction on a platter and been told, ‘the research proves it.’
"Clearly written and well organized, this book shows how to apply the principles of universal design for learning (UDL) across all subject areas and grade levels. The editors and contributors describe practical ways to develop classroom goals, assessments, materials, and methods that use UDL to meet the needs of all learners. Specific teaching ideas are presented for reading, writing, science, mathematics, history, and the arts, including detailed examples and troubleshooting tips. Particular attention is given to how UDL can inform effective, innovative uses of technology in the inclusive classroom. Subject Areas/Keywords: assessments, classrooms, content areas, curriculum design, digital media, educational technology, elementary, inclusion, instruction, learning disabilities, literacy, schools, secondary, special education, supports, teaching methods, UDL, universal design Audience: General and special educators in grades K-8, literacy specialists, school psychologists, administrators, teacher educators, and graduate students"--
In classrooms and lectures we learn not only about academic topics but also about ourselves, our peers and how people and ideas interact. Education – An Impossible Profession extends the ways in which we might think about these processes by offering a refreshing reconsideration of key educational experiences including those of: being judged and assessed, both formally and informally adapting to different groups for different purposes struggling to think under pressure learning to recognise and adapt to the expectations of others. This book brings psychoanalysis to new audiences, graphically illustrating its importance to understandings of teaching, learning and classrooms. Drawing on the author’s original research, it considers the classroom context, including policy demands and professional pressures, and the complexity of peer and pedagogic relationships and interactions asking how these might be being experienced and what implications such experiences might have for learners and teachers. The discussions will be of interest not only to teachers, leading-learners and teacher-educators, but also to individuals interested in education policy, professional practice and theories of education.
Written by experts in the field, this book aims to provide an alternative approach to quality teaching in higher education by deriving a model of good university teaching from the academics which universities have chosen as their best teachers. Award-winning teachers outline their beliefs and practices as a teacher, covering key topics including: assessment motivating students planning courses and lessons teaching large classes reflection and feedback managing discussion and group work. Illustrated with extracts from interviews with the award-winning teachers, and packed with activities and further reading, this textbook provides a set of principles for good teaching internationally.
This book is concerned with understanding the complex ways in which gender violence and poverty impact on young people’s lives, and the potential for education to challenge violence. Although there has been a recent expansion of research on gender violence and schooling, the field of research that brings together thinking on gender violence, poverty and education is in its infancy. This book sets out to establish this new field by offering innovative research insights into the nature of violence affecting children and young people; the sources of violence, including the relationship with poverty and inequality; the effects of violence on young subjectivities; and the educational challenge of how to counter violence. Authors address three interrelated aims in their chapters: to identify theoretical and methodological framings for understanding the relationship between gender, violence, poverty and education to demonstrate how young people living in varying contexts of poverty in the Global South learn about, engage in, respond to and resist gender violence to investigate how institutions, including schools, families, communities, governments, international and non-governmental organisations and the media constrain or expand possibilities to challenge gender violence in the Global South. Describing a range of innovative research projects, the chapters display what scholarly work can offer to help meet the educational challenge, and to find ways to help young people and those around them to understand, resist and rupture the many faces of violence. Gender Violence in Poverty Contexts will appeal to an international audience of postgraduate students, academics and researchers in the fields of international and comparative education, gender and women’s studies, teacher education, poverty, development and conflict studies, African and Asian studies and related disciplines. It will also be of interest to professionals in NGOs and other organisations, and policy makers, keen to develop research-informed practice. Winner of the 2016 Jackie Kirk Outstanding Book Award.
Japan’s Fundamental Law on Education was revised in 2006 and new curriculum guidelines along with new proposals for strengthening the position of moral education reflect the increased political focus, particularly by the two Abe-administrations. Changes include increased emphasis on patriotism, on respect for life and the environment, on individual responsibility, on respecting differences and other countries and on a general strengthening of moral values. This volume describes the history of moral education in Japan, analyses recent changes in curriculum and practices, and takes a closer look at examples of official, semi-official and local discourses on moral education and values. The analysis covers policy statements, teaching material and research, Japanese as well as Western. Using theories of globalization, cosmopolitanism and universal human values it is the intention, by using an Asian example, to illustrate and elaborate upon existing discourses within theories of globalization and cosmopolitanism as well as in education and values and citizenship studies. Chapters include: Revision of the fundamental law on Education in 2006 and beyond Official and semi-official bids for contents of moral education Moral education in practice Risk, globalization and meaning in Japanese Moral Education This book will be of interest to scholars specializing in education in Japan, and scholars in the academic field of moral, character and citizenship education.
Inclusive Technology Enhanced Learning draws together a remarkable breadth of research findings from across the field, providing useful data on the power of technology to solve cognitive, physical, emotional or geographic challenges in education. A far-ranging assessment, this book combines research, policy, and practical evidence to show what digital technologies work best for which learners and why. Inclusive Technology Enhanced Learning takes a number of unique perspectives, looking at uses of digital technologies through a detailed learning framework; considering different groups of users and how they can be individually supported through digital technologies; and exploring how those who support different categories of learners can apply technologies to their specific support needs. This powerful meta-analysis of research on technology enhanced learning will be invaluable reading for anyone concerned with the impacts of digital technologies on learning across subject areas, age ranges, and levels of ability.
Co-teaching is an equal partnership between a special education teacher and a general education teacher. They share a classroom and responsibilities for teaching all students in the class. But what does co-teaching look like? How does it work? Are we doing it right? Finding the answers to these questions is critical to the effectiveness of a co-teaching program that is grounded in inclusive educational practices. In this book, you'll learn how co-teachers * Define what effective co-teaching is and what it is not; * Engage students in evolving groups, using multiple perspectives for meaningful learning opportunities; * Resolve differences in teaching and assessment practices; * Respond to parents and students about inclusion and co-teaching concerns; and * Organize and teach an equitable, inclusive classroom. Concise and informative answers to questions posed by real teachers, administrators, and parents help you learn about the components of co-teaching. And vignettes about issues that arise in co-teaching situations will help you start conversations and solve day-to-day challenges inherent to co-teaching. Whether you're already involved in co-teaching programs or are soon to embark on the effort, Teaching in Tandem provides knowledge and tools that you can use to create effective partnerships and powerful learning environments for teachers and students alike. Every teacher, principal, administrator, and paraprofessional who participates in co-teaching--or who is worried about how to address inclusion--needs this book. An additional annotated resource list is available online, along with an ASCD Study Guide.

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