As a research neuroscientist, Lise Eliot has made the study of the human brain her life's work. But it wasn't until she was pregnant with her first child that she became intrigued with the study of brain development. She wanted to know precisely how the baby's brain is formed, and when and how each sense, skill, and cognitive ability is developed. And just as important, she was interested in finding out how her role as a nurturer can affect this complex process. How much of her baby's development is genetically ordained--and how much is determined by environment? Is there anything parents can do to make their babies' brains work better--to help them become smarter, happier people? Drawing upon the exploding research in this field as well as the stories of real children, What's Going On in There? is a lively and thought-provoking book that charts the brain's development from conception through the critical first five years. In examining the many factors that play crucial roles in that process, What's Going On in There? explores the evolution of the senses, motor skills, social and emotional behaviors, and mental functions such as attention, language, memory, reasoning, and intelligence. This remarkable book also discusses: how a baby's brain is "assembled" from scratch the critical prenatal factors that shapebrain development how the birthing process itself affects the brain which forms of stimulation are most effective at promoting cognitive development how boys' and girls' brains develop differently how nutrition, stress, and other physical and social factors can permanently affect a child's brain Brilliantly blending cutting-edge science with a mother's wisdom and insight, What's Going On in There? is an invaluable contribution to the nature versus nurture debate. Children's development is determined both by the genes they are born with and the richness of their early environment. This timely and important book shows parents the innumerable ways in which they can actually help their children grow better brains. From the Hardcover edition.
Recent studies on brain function and growth have opened the way to discovering what is going on in an infant's mind and reinvigorated the nature/nurture debate. The Human Genome Project promises a blueprint for every individual, but these exciting genetic discoveries, says neuroscientist Lise Eliot, also raises the alarming tendency to think there is little we can do to influence a child's fate, that it is all a matter of heredity.
Designed to promote literacy in young children and to empower parents, educators, and librarians, this guide is filled with simple strategies, creative activities, and detailed instructions that help make reading fun. • Recommended book lists for promoting reading • An overview of basic strategies and components of an early literacy program • Helpful outline of pre-literacy skills required for reading success • Detailed instructions for early literacy activities
Turning conventional thinking about gender differences on its head, Lise Eliot issues a call to close the troubling gaps between boys and girls and help all children reach their fullest potential. Drawing on years of exhaustive research and her own work in the field of neuroplasticity, Eliot argues that infant brains are so malleable that small differences at birth become amplified over time as parents, teachers, and the culture at large unwittingly reinforce gender stereotypes. Indicating points of intervention where social pressures can be minimised, she offers concrete solutions for helping everyone grow into wellrounded individuals.
This clinical reference book presents state-of-the-science knowledge about the neurobiology and genetics of the major mental disorders and how this corresponds with their psychiatric features and neuropsychological traits. The text demonstrates how the application of neuropsychology to these disorders provides a more comprehensive foundation for greater accuracy in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. The book focuses on the neuropathological and pathophysiological basis of the various symptoms, emphasizing the biological basis of each disorder. This approach stresses the importance of looking at the other functional impacts of these manifestations (for example, cognitive deficits secondary to depression). The text compares adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders and covers the major forms of psychopathology including ADHD; Learning Disabilities; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Mood, Anxiety, Personality, and Schizophrenic Disorders; Cortical and Subcortical Dementias; and Delirium. The book is written for clinical professionals to increase diagnostic accuracy and intervention success and to provide a way to approach psychopathologies as disorders of the neurological system. Key Features: Provides state-of-the-science knowledge about the application of neuropsychological practice to the major forms of psychopathology Examines neurological and neuropsychological features of the major forms of psychopathology Demonstrates how the application of neurobiology and genetics to psychiatric disorders can increase accuracy of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment Considers adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders
For decades, the conventional wisdom of neuroscience held that the hardware of the brain is fixed - that we are stuck with what we were born with. But recent pioneering experiments in neuroplasticity reveal that the brain is capable not only of altering its structure but also of generating new neurons, even into old age. The brain can adapt, heal, renew itself after trauma and compensate for disability. In this groundbreaking book, highly respected science writer Sharon Begley documents how this fundamental paradigm shift is transforming both our understanding of the human mind and our approach to deep-seated emotional, cognitive and behavioural problems. These breakthroughs show that it is possible to reset our happiness meter, regain the use of limbs disabled by stroke, train the mind to break cycles of depression and OCD and reverse age-related changes in the brain.
Ausgehend von der Beobachtung des kindlichen Spielens erläutert der Autor, wie Kinder denken und lernen.
Die acht großen Entwicklungssprünge in der geistigen und körperlichen Entwicklung eines Babys gehen mit viel Unruhe und Geschrei einher und bringen Eltern zuweilen an den Rand der Verzweiflung. Dieser Ratgeber zeigt, wie Eltern sich und ihren Kindern helfen können, die herausfordernde Zeit der ersten 14 Lebensmonate gut zu überstehen.
In this national bestseller, acclaimed, award-winning psychologist Dr. David Walsh explains exactly what happens to the human brain on the path from childhood into adolescence and adulthood. Revealing the latest scientific findings in easy-to-understand terms, Dr. Walsh shows why moodiness, quickness to anger and to take risks, miscommunication, fatigue, territoriality, and other familiar teenage behavior problems are so common -- all are linked to physical changes and growth in the adolescent brain. Why Do They Act That Way? is the first book to explain the changes in teens' brains and show parents how to use this information to understand, communicate with, and stay connected to their kids. Through real-life stories, Dr. Walsh makes sense of teenagers' many mystifying, annoying, and even outright dangerous behavioral difficulties and provides realistic solutions for dealing with everyday as well as severe challenges. Dr. Walsh's techniques include, among others: sample dialogues that help teens and parents talk civilly and constructively with each other, behavioral contracts, and Parental Survival Kits that provide practical advice for dealing with issues like curfews, disrespectful language and actions, and bullying. With this arsenal of strategies, parents can help their kids learn to control impulses, manage erratic behavior, cope with their changing bodies, and, in effect, develop a second brain.
How much of our behavior is determined by our genes and how much by our environment? Fiercely debated but not fully resolved, we continue to grapple with this nature-vs.-nurture question. But data from the study of the developing and adult brain are providing us with new ways of thinking about this issue â€" ways that, finally, promise answers. Whether our personality, our intelligence, and our behavior are more likely to be shaped and affected by our environment or our genetic coding is not simply an idle question for today’s researchers. There are tremendous consequences to understanding the crucial role that each plays. How we raise and educate our children, how we treat various mental diseases or conditions, how we care for our elderly â€" these are just some of the issues that can be informed by a better and more complete understanding of brain development. John Dowling, eminent neuroscience researcher, looks at these and other important issues. The work that is being done by scientists on the connection between the brain and vision, as well as the ways in which our brains help us learn new languages, are particularly revealing. From this groundbreaking new research we are able to gain startling new insights into how the brain functions and how it can (or cannot) be molded and changed. By studying the brain across the spectrum of our lives, from infancy through adulthood and into old age, we see how the brain develops, transforms, and adjusts through the years. Looking specifically at early development and then at the opportunities for additional learning and development as we grow older, we learn more about the ways in which both nature and nurture play key roles over the course of a human lifetime.
ìBy far, the most comprehensive and detailed coverage of pediatric neuropsychology available in a single book today, Davis provides coverage of basic principles of pediatric neuropsychology, but overall the work highlights applications to daily practice and special problems encountered by the pediatric neuropsychologist.î Cecil R. Reynolds, PhD Texas A&M University "The breadth and depth of this body of work is impressive. Chapters written by some of the best researchers and authors in the field of pediatric neuropsychology address every possible perspective on brain-behavior relationships culminating in an encyclopedic textÖ. This [book] reflects how far and wide pediatric neuropsychology has come in the past 20 years and the promise of how far it will go in the next." Elaine Fletcher-Janzen, EdD, NCSP, ABPdN The Chicago School of Professional Psychology "...it would be hard to imagine a clinical situation in pediatric neuropsychology in whichthis book would fail as a valuable resource."--Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology "I believe there is much to recommend this hefty volume. It is a solid reference that I can see appreciating as a resource as I update my training bibliography."--Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society This landmark reference covers all aspects of pediatric neuropsychology from a research-based perspective, while presenting an applied focus with practical suggestions and guidelines for clinical practice. Useful both as a training manual for graduate students and as a comprehensive reference for experienced practitioners, it is an essential resource for those dealing with a pediatric population. This handbook provides an extensive overview of the most common medical conditions that neuropsychologists encounter while dealing with pediatric populations. It also discusses school-based issues such as special education law, consulting with school staff, and reintegrating children back into mainstream schools. It contains over 100 well-respected authors who are leading researchers in their respective fields. Additionally, each of the 95 chapters includes an up-to-date review of available research, resulting in the most comprehensive text on pediatric neuropsychology available in a single volume. Key Features: Provides thorough information on understanding functional neuroanatomy and development, and on using functional neuroimaging Highlights clinical practice issues, such as legal and ethical decision-making, dealing with child abuse and neglect, and working with school staff Describes a variety of professional issues that neuropsychologists must confront during their daily practice, such as ethics, multiculturalism, child abuse, forensics, and psychopharmacology
Very practical science based tips and guidelines and stories for moms and dads of baby girls. Including: Why you need a book just about girls. The very different health issues, genetic predisposition, hard wiring, neurological and biological development of girls, including unique strengths and weaknesses. How to understand the core nature of your girl and nourish it through problems of crying, fussing, eating, sleeping, attaching and other key issues during the first 12 months of life. Warm hearted stories about girls and tips from real moms, and a preview of what's to come for girls as they become toddlers, preschool kids, pubescent and beyond.
An expert in child development champions the importance of an unhurried childhood As our children are pushed harder than ever to perform so that they will one day "make the grade" in the adult world, parents are beginning to question the wisdom of scheduling childhood's basic pleasures. Across the country there have been parent rebellions against the overburdening with homework of young children by school officials bent on improving standardized test scores. And the "birth to three" movement has sparked a national debate on child development and educational policy. In Reclaiming Childhood, William C. Crain argues that rather than trying to control a young child, the best a parent can offer is "a patient and unobtrusive presence that gives the child the security and the freedom to explore the world on her own." He examines how children find their way to natural development through experiences with nature, art, and language, and makes a strong case for child-centered education-a movement that may be under fire, but that is very much alive.
Raising a baby is joyful, amazing . . . and ridiculously difficult. But with some insight into what's actually going on inside your little one's head, your job as a parent can become a little bit easier—and a lot more fun. In Think Like a Baby, coauthors Amber and Andy Ankowski—The Doctor and the Dad—show parents how to re-create classic child development experiments using common household items. These simple step-by-step experiments apply from the third trimester through age seven and beyond and help parents understand their children's physical, cognitive, language, and social development. Amazed parents won't just read about how their kids are behaving, changing, and thinking at various stages, they'll actually see it for themselves while interacting and having fun with them at the same time. Each experiment is followed by a discussion of its practical implications for parents, such as why to always bring more than one toy to a restaurant, which baby gadgets to buy (and which ones to avoid), how to get kids to be perfectly happy eating just half of their dessert, and much more.
There is no denying it: motherhood splits a woman’s life forever, into a before and an after. To this doubled life Lisa Catherine Harper brings a wealth of feeling and a wry sense of humor, a will to understand the emotional and biological transformations that motherhood entails, and a narrative gift that any reader will enjoy. Harper documents her own journey across this great divide as a seasoned explorer might, observing, researching, relating anecdotes and critical information. From late-night Lindy Hop dancing to crippling sciatica, morning sickness to indulgent meals, graduate seminars to sophisticated ultrasounds, Harper marries scientific details with intimate insights as she uncovers the fascinating strangeness of this remarkably familiar territory. Following Harper’s first pregnancy from conception to her daughter’s first word, A Double Life looks at how the biological facts of motherhood give rise to life-altering emotional and psychological changes. It shows us how motherhood transforms the female body, hijacks a woman’s mind, and splits her life in two, creating an identity both brand new and as old as time. It charts the passage from individual to incubator, from pregnancy, labor, and nursing to language acquisition, from coupledom to the complex reality of family life. Harper’s carefully researched story reminds us that motherhood’s central joys are also its most essential transformations. Watch a book trailer.
Based on a series of clinical studies of schizoid problems, this book is a sequel to Harry Guntrip's theoretical study of the emergence of the schizoid problem, Personality Structure and Human Interaction (1961). It includes revised versions of earlier papers, and also much original material. In Part 1, a description of the schizoid position is given, in terms of relation to the external world, internal states of ego disintegration and, the core of the problem, the dissociated and lost emotional heart of the total self.Part 2 reviews the theoretical development which makes it necessary to see manic-depressive problems in the light of the deeper and more subtle schizoid condition. Part 3, on "The Nature of Basic Ego-Weakness", seeks to assess fully the importance of Winnicott's research into the earliest beginnings of ego development, as the infant slowly grows into psychic separation from the mother, a process that involves both the opportunity for individuation and also the risk of loss of relationship, as well as the risk of possibly permanent stunting of the ego development instead of growth of basic ego relatedness in the mentally healthy person.Part 4 explores the implications for psychotherapy of the study of the schizoid problem, particularly in the matter of the personal therapeutic relationship of therapist and patient. And finally, in Part 5, the review of theory is put on a broad foundation with a chapter on "The Concept of Psychodynamic Science" and another comparing the ego theories of Hartmann and the "object-relational" thinkers, Melanie Klein, Fairbairn, and Winnicott.
• A New York Times Science Bestseller • “Packed with science and human stories, the book is an intense read. . . . The struggle and resilience of [van der Kolk’s] patients is very moving.” —New Scientist A pioneering researcher transforms our understanding of trauma and offers a bold new paradigm for healing Trauma is a fact of life. Veterans and their families deal with the painful aftermath of combat; one in five Americans has been molested; one in four grew up with alcoholics; one in three couples have engaged in physical violence. Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, one of the world’s foremost experts on trauma, has spent over three decades working with survivors. In The Body Keeps the Score, he uses recent scientific advances to show how trauma literally reshapes both body and brain, compromising sufferers’ capacities for pleasure, engagement, self-control, and trust. He explores innovative treatments—from neurofeedback and meditation to sports, drama, and yoga—that offer new paths to recovery by activating the brain’s natural neuroplasticity. Based on Dr. van der Kolk’s own research and that of other leading specialists, The Body Keeps the Score exposes the tremendous power of our relationships both to hurt and to heal—and offers new hope for reclaiming lives. From the Trade Paperback edition.
This is a spiritual book that enables you to use your dreams to reprogram your brain to experience healing and to manifest your true self.

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