Everyone wonders what it's really like in space, but very few of us have ever had the chance to experience it firsthand. This captivating illustrated collection brings together stories from dozens of international astronauts—men and women who've actually been there—who have returned with accounts of the sometimes weird, often funny, and awe-inspiring sensations and realities of being in space. With playful artwork accompanying each, here are the real stories behind backwards dreams, "moon face," the tricks of sleeping in zero gravity and aiming your sneeze during a spacewalk, the importance of packing hot sauce, and dozens of other cosmic quirks and amazements that come with travel in and beyond low Earth orbit.
»Von Zeit zu Zeit erscheinen vor den Fenstern eines Raumschiffs Wunder ...« Millionen haben das Video gesehen, in dem der Astronaut Chris Hadfield singend und Gitarre spielend durch die Raumstation ISS schwebt. Fasziniert schauen die Menschen seither nach oben: Wie verändert der Blick aus 400 km Höhe die Sicht auf unser Leben? Chris Hadfield nimmt uns mit in schwindelerregende Sphären: Er erzählt von riskanten Manövern und von der Kunst, stets auf das Schlimmste vorbereitet zu sein und zugleich an das Unmögliche zu glauben. Chris Hadfield ist neun Jahre alt, als er im Juli 1969 die Mondlandung live im Fernsehen verfolgt. Augenblicklich weiß er, was er werden will: Astronaut! Mittlerweile hat er an die 4000 Stunden im Weltraum verbracht und gehört zu den erfahrensten Raumfahrern der Welt – zuletzt als Kommandeur der internationalen Raumstation ISS. Jetzt nimmt er uns mit in den Weltraum: Wir erfahren, wie man überhaupt Astronaut wird (für alle, die den Traum noch nicht aufgegeben haben), was man dafür alles können muss (u.a. Schwimmen!, Toiletten reparieren), wie sich der erste Raketenstart anfühlt (als säße man in einem Container, der von einem riesigen LKW gerammt wird) und was man beim ersten Raumspaziergang beachten muss. Eine realistische, humorvolle, aber auch demütige Liebeserklärung an das Leben auf der Erde und die Wunder des Universums, die uns zeigt, wie viel Bodenhaftung man braucht, um abheben zu können.
1943 stellt das Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory der NACA,die später zur NASA wird, erstmalig afroamerikanische Frauen ein. "Menschliche Rechner" - unter ihnen Dorothy Vaughan, die 1953 Vorgesetzte der brillanten afroamerikanischen Mathematikerin Katherine Johnson wird. Trotz Diskriminierung und Vorurteilen, treiben sie die Forschungen der NASA voran und Katherine Johnsons Berechnungen werden maßgeblich für den Erfolg der Apollo-Missionen. Dies ist ihre Geschichte. "Mit dieser unglaublich mitreißenden und vielschichtigen Erzählung zeigt Shetterly ihr Können. Die Geschichte begeistert in allen Aspekten." Booklist
A collection of entertaining tales that pose some of life's more difficult questions: What happens in an inter-species insect fight? Should I get someone to look at that mysterious shooting pain? How does one deflect the amorous advances of an unconscious friend? From the playground to adult life, these quirky stories make for an absorbing read.
As a small boy Story Musgrave found solace, protection and beauty in the world of nature. His deep affinity with nature and the wonders of the universe would one day set him on an inexorable course to the stars. Be warned however: this remarkable book is not your standard, chronological biography.
The author serves up a touching, long-overdue tribute to the astronauts who died while pursuing their very difficult jobs, including the victims of the Apollo fire and the two Gemini astronauts killed in a plane wreck, as well as others. Simultaneous. (History)
Peter Bond describes the development and evolution of space stations, with particular emphasis on the International Space Station, beginning with the revolution that began in 1970, when Salyut 1, the world's first space station was sent into orbit by the Soviet Union. Defeated in the race to the Moon, the Soviets redirected their efforts towards the conquest of near-Earth space. In the next three decades, their increasingly large and sophisticated structures rewrote the history books as cosmonauts continued to push back all space endurance records. Only the U.S. Skylab, a technological cul-de-sac based on surplus Apollo hardware, interrupted this era of Soviet domination. By the mid-1990's, Russian physician Valeri Poliakov had lived continuously for 14 months on board the Mir space station, long enough to travel to Mars and back. The book explains how the human exploitation of low-Earth orbit is about to change. With Mir no longer in existence, all eyes are on the next generation, the International Space Station (ISS).
Colonel Chris Hadfield has spent decades training as an astronaut and has logged nearly 4,000 hours in space. During this time he has broken into a Space Station with a Swiss army knife, disposed of a live snake while piloting a plane, been temporarily blinded while clinging to the exterior of an orbiting spacecraft, and become a YouTube sensation with his performance of David Bowie's 'Space Oddity' in space. The secret to Chris Hadfield's success - and survival - is an unconventional philosophy he learned at NASA: prepare for the worst - and enjoy every moment of it. In his book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Chris Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement - and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff. You might never be able to build a robot, pilot a spacecraft, make a music video or perform basic surgery in zero gravity like Colonel Hadfield. But his vivid and refreshing insights in this book will teach you how to think like an astronaut, and will change, completely, the way you view life on Earth - especially your own.
THE BRILLIANT NOVEL THAT LAUNCHED THE VARLEY PHENOMENON The invaders came in 2050…They did not kill anyone outright. they said they came on behalf of the intelligent species of Earth—dolphins and whales. The Invaders quietly destroyed every evidence of technology, then peacefully departed, leaving behind plowed ground and sprouting seeds. In the next two years, ten billion humans starved to death. The remnants of humanity that survived relocated to the moon and other planets. But they are not alone in their struggle—someone or something, somewhere in deep space, is sending them advanced scientific data via the Ophiuchi Hotline. And by the twenty-fifth century, the technological gifts from the Hotline—especially its biological and medical solutions—have created a world unlike any ever known or imagined… From the Paperback edition.
On February 1, 2003, ten astronauts were orbiting the planet. Seven headed back to Earth on the space shuttle Columbia. They never made it. And the three men left behind found themselves too far from home. Chris Jones chronicles the efforts of the beleaguered Mission Control in Houston and Moscow as they work frantically against the clock to bring their men safely back to Earth, ultimately settling on a plan that felt, at best, like a long shot. Yet even amid the danger, the call of space is a siren song, and Too Far From Home details beautifully the majesty and mystique of space travel, while reminding us all how perilous it is to soar beyond the sky.
Addressing the vulnerabilities in today's critical infrastructure to natural disasters and terrorism, this practical book describes what you should be doing to protect your infrastructure before the unthinkable happens. You learn how to maintain command and control in any disaster, and how to predict the probability of those disasters. Written by two highly regarded experts in the field, this one-of-a-kind book shows you how to simplify risk assessments and emergency response procedures to disasters affecting our critical national and local infrastructure.
Three stories of speculative fiction asking the important questions of life:What if monkeys had continued to dominate the space program? What if an alien invasion went almost unnoticed? What if space colonization were as messed up as colonization anywhere else? Includes: Alien Fast-Food Wars, A Lovely Failure and The First Creatured Mission.
Based on almost 25 years of investigation and research, science writer Chris Rutkowski looks critically at abduction stories.
This book urges us to recast our approach to understanding modern African history by recognizing the religious basis of African political practice... a critical corrective to much of the recent literature on colonialism and globalization.
In ‘Columbia: Final Voyage’ aerospace writer Philip Chien, who has over 20 years’ experience covering the US space program, provides a unique insight into the crew members who lost their lives in the Columbia disaster. Chien interviewed all seven crew members several times and got to know them as individuals. He reviews in detail their training, their scientific work and other activities during their successful 16-day flight, the background of the accident itself and a detailed first-hand account of what happened that fateful day in February 2003. The author provides a comprehensive and personal look at both the Columbia astronauts and the STS-107 mission, together with a behind-the-scenes account of other people involved in the mission and their personal reactions to the accident. Forward by Jonathan B. Clark, widower of Columbia astronaut Laurel Clark Introduction by Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin
Everything was ordinary. Men worked in factories and fields. Women were shopping. Children were at school. Then came the four-minute warning. Wires hummed madly between heads of governments. Just before the massive retaliation went into the air the world realised that no-one had despatched the first rocket. The retaliation was checked with seconds to spare. Experts examined the ruined city. There was something else besides radiation. Deadly bacteria from an unknown source spread across the planet. More alien bombs followed the first. But there was no real pattern in the attacks, if they were genuine attacks. At last the detectors found the alien ships. They were fighting among themselves and earth was the battle-area. Could the remnants of humanity interfere? What would be the result if they did?
Marvin Martin, the show's host, is angry. Night after night he strips his guests of their pitiful pretensions, their commonplace hypocrisies - but how long has it been since he uncovered a genuine revelation? Hurwitz, who selects Martin's victims, is scared. He made a bad mistake when he chose Doris Jensen; she turned out to be from a competitive network and ruined a taping. Hurwitz's job is in danger. Walter Monaghan, historically, the 29th man to have walked on the moon, is desperate. He wants to tell the Revelations audience the truth about America's "space program" - that it never got off the ground. If he's just another nut, why is it so important that he be silenced?
These true stories, written by the pilots themselves, describe their most thrilling aviation firsts, and will have you wondering how they found the courage to accomplish their "first flights."
A celebration of the ordinary men and women, from all walks of life, whose ingenuity, passion, and sacrifice helped the space program meet President Kennedy's challenge to land a man on the moon and return him safely to earth.

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