"This book is important to every mother and daughter, and to every woman who wants to be one." MAYA ANGELOUJo Maeder was a high-energy, irreverent Z100 radio "ZJ" in New York City when a series of crises led her to do the unthinkable: leave New York for the Bible Belt- "Greensboring," North Carolina-to care for her estranged, eccentric "Mama Jo." What she thought would be some of the worst years of her life turned out to be some of the best. The same was true for her mother. Jo also discovered there's nothing boring about Greensboro. Though often rocky, this "marriage" was a triumphant success, leading Jo to repair a long-fractured family, smooth her rough edges, and find a new and vibrant life she never imagined.This you'll-laugh-you'll-cry story has helped others navigate their own present or future "long goodbye" with an elderly loved one as well as the complex family issues that arise. Even those who have already lost a loved one have felt a cathartic release and clarity. "This generous gift of a book explores the mystery of how doing the right thing can, in the end, become infinitely more." Tommy Hays
In-laws are the inescapable consequence of marriage. Whether they’re kindly or malevolent, helpful or crazy, they’re unavoidable. The relationship can be traumatic, rewarding, maddening, and hilarious—sometimes all at once. In I Married My Mother-in-Law and Other Tales of In-Laws We Can’t Live With—and Can’t Live Without, Ilena Silverman brings together a collection of talented, successful writers who plumb their own experiences for extraordinary and unexpected wisdom about this prickly and often misunderstood relationship. We hear from some of today’s best authors, including Michael Chabon, who writes movingly about the lessons he learned from his first father-in-law; Kathryn Harrison, whose relationship with her father-in-law was far more rewarding and less complicated than the one she had with her own father; Matt Bai, who struggled across cultural barriers to learn more about the lives of his reserved Japanese-American in-laws; Martha McPhee, who explores the difficulty in fully knowing her husband without ever having known his parents; Susan Straight, who recounts her experience as the first white woman to marry into her African-American husband’s extended family; and Ayelet Waldman, who ponders the competition between wives and their mothers-in-law for the attention of their husbands/sons. By turns blunt and poignant, horrifying and touching, the essays reflect the rich complexities of these bewildering and life-changing relationships. Remarkable for both the quality of its prose and the scope of its emotional insight, I Married My Mother-in-Law is an unforgettable anthology about the struggles and rewards of life with our other families.
A tent was set up and a triangular table was placed in the middle of the tent. There were one hen and one cock on the table with a big bowl of rice and the smell of burning incense. The bride and the groom in traditional wear stood opposite each other, but the table was placed between them. The usher of the ceremony told the bride to bow to the groom, and in return the groom had to bow in courtesy to the bride. The rite of bowing one after the other would be the peak of the ceremony, and then the reception would be held. Mother and Father became husband and wife right after the wedding ceremony. Then their future was up to them.
When Lindy Tefft married Mr. America, she was sure she had married Mr. Perfect. Her fantasy was far from the truth. When abuse from childhood repeated in her marriage, Lindy felt that she had no escape. Then, greedy celebrity-hungry scam artists ravaged their lives. Lindy’s voice of reason often fell on Mr. America’s “deaf” ears. Chaos, insanity, and financial disaster nearly ruined the author’s life as she crawled through a tunnel of terror. With no one to count on, Lindy found herself. Tefft’s roller coaster life will leave the reader breathless. Her insightful guidance will inspire others to find hope where there seems to be none. Lindy deserves acclaim for her honesty, vulnerability, and courage. She became her own hero, and through it all, discovered Simply Lindy.
Drawing on ethnographic research, Living Sharia examines the role of sharia in the sociopolitical processes of contemporary Malaysia. The book traces the contested implementation of Islamic family and criminal laws and sharia economics to provide cultural frameworks for understanding sharia among Muslims and non-Muslims. Timothy Daniels explores how the way people think about sharia is often entangled with notions about race, gender equality, nationhood, liberal pluralism, citizenship, and universal human rights. He reveals that Malaysians� ideas about sharia are not isolated from�nor always opposed to�liberal pluralism and secularism. Living Sharia will be of interest to scholars as well as to policy makers, consultants, and professionals working with global NGOs.
Made famous in the 1976 documentary Harlan County USA, this pocket of Appalachian coal country has been home to generations of miners--and to some of the most bitter labor battles of the 20th century. It has also produced a rich tradition of protest songs and a wealth of fascinating culture and custom that has remained largely undiscovered by outsiders, until now. They Say in Harlan County is not a book about coal miners so much as a dialogue in which more than 150 Harlan County women and men tell the story of their region, from pioneer times through the dramatic strikes of the 1930s and '70s, up to the present. Alessandro Portelli draws on 25 years of original interviews to take readers into the mines and inside the lives of those who work, suffer, and often die in them--from black lung, falling rock, suffocation, or simply from work that can be literally backbreaking. The book is structured as a vivid montage of all these voices--stoic, outraged, grief-stricken, defiant--skillfully interwoven with documents from archives, newspapers, literary works, and the author's own participating and critical voice. Portelli uncovers the whole history and memory of the United States in this one symbolic place, through settlement, civil war, slavery, industrialization, immigration, labor conflict, technological change, migration, strip mining, environmental and social crises, and resistance. And as hot-button issues like mountain-top removal and the use of "clean coal" continue to hit the news, the history of Harlan County--especially as seen through the eyes of those who lived it--is becoming increasingly important. With rare emotional immediacy, gripping narratives, and unforgettable characters, They Say in Harlan County tells the real story of a culture, the resilience of its people, and the human costs of coal mining.
In this collection of essays and poems, Dr. Robin Shapiro captures the depth of the struggles and the triumphs of a healing journey. Using her own healing path as a canvas for her words, Robin offers solace and encouragement to all who are seeking health, wellness, and happiness. Her experiences in medicine have provided rich soil for understanding the nature of compassion and skilled listening, as the people she cares for and teaches heal their lives. Throughout TOUCHSTONES, there is something that will resonate with the reader and touch those wounded places that need a soft space to land. Robin creates a healing landscape with her stories and places it on the heart as a salve that mends us in the broken places. TOUCHSTONES is a call to action... Since everything is impermanent and everyone is impermanent, healing must unfold now... TOUCHSTONES will help the reader become more aware of how precious this human life is and move in the world in a way that can bring about inner peace...
Justin Stokes would never forget the summer she turned fourteen, nor the woman who transformed her bleak adolescent life into a wondrous place of brilliant color. In the little pondside hut also known as the “finishing school,” eccentric, free-spirited Ursula DeVane opened up a world full of magical possibilities for Justin, teaching her valuable lessons of love and loyalty, and encouraging her to change, to learn, to grow. But the lessons of the finishing school have their dark side as well, as Justin learns how deep friendship can be shattered by shocking, unforgivable betrayal. NOTE: This edition does not include images.
Explores language practices and discourse patterns of Mexican-origin mothers and the language socialization of their children. Drawing on women's own experiences as both mothers and borderland residents, the author combines personal odyssey with ethnographic research to show new ways to connect language to issues of education, political economy, and social identity.
The people in each chapter have gone through many problems, physical and mental abuse, death, suicide, murder, alcoholism, drugs, marriage, divorce, children and adoption. Sometime we as Christians forget that being a Christian means to forgive the inexcusable because God has forgiven the inexcusable in us. Let the truth be told, unless you let go, unless you forgive yourself, unless you forgive the people that did you wrong or harmed you in anyway, unless you forgive the situation, unless you realize that that situation is over, you cannot move forward and God cannot bless you and we all want to be blessed. *Matthew 6:14-15 "For if you forgive man and or woman when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But, if you do not forgive man and or woman their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins." The sense of the reality of spiritual things, and the power to rest the thought upon them, is as various as the power of flight in different birds. See a great eagle soaring without effort high in the air, or circling with undazzled eyes towards the sun! A noble bird with such powers of flight and of sight pictures an affection for spiritual thought of the strongest, most searching kind, which rises highest above superficial appearances and takes the most comprehensive views of like, the most in accord with the Divine wisdom. *Isaiah 40:31 "But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles."
At the beginning of the 1990s, Linda Grant’s mother, Rose, was diagnosed with Dementia. In Remind Me Who I Am, Again Linda Grant tells the story of Rose’s illness and tries to reconstruct the history of their Jewish immigrant family, stalking them from Russia and Poland to New York and London. Writing with humour and great tenderness, Grant explores profound questions about memory, autonomy and identity, and asks if we can ever really know our parents.
Forgetting the past, facing the future Stephanie Phillips is sick of charm. And Clint Morgan, the newest resident of Covenant Falls, has it in spades. Stephanie knows she should run the other way because the former Blackhawk pilot is too good-looking, too charismatic…and much too sexy. As the town veterinarian, Stephanie has truly found her home here. Clint, on the other hand, is staying for only a short time while he recovers from an injury. But when he starts to fit seamlessly into the close-knit community, the irresistible risk-taker makes his way into her heart.
This collection of readings presents a variety of perspectives on ageing from different communities across the United States: Native American, Puerto Rican, African American, the elderly homeless, white working class, gay and Mexican amongst many others. The readings cover topics such as: life course; social and psychological contexts of ageing; paid and unpaid activity; the American family; and health.
A level 2 Oxford Bookworms Library graded reader. Retold for Learners of English by Clare West. Sherlock Holmes is the greatest detective of them all. He sits in his room, and smokes his pipe. He listens, and watches, and thinks. He listens to the steps coming up the stairs; he watches the door opening - and he knows what question the stranger will ask. In these three of his best stories, Holmes has three visitors to the famous flat in Baker Street - visitors who bring their troubles to the only man in the world who can help them.
National treasure Lorraine Kelly has been great company for years: a sunny, vivacious and loveable presence in your home. Now it's possible to get to know her even better as, for the first time, she opens up about her eventful life and tells her story in her own words. From her working-class childhood growing up in one of the toughest areas of Glasgow, to her early career in journalism during which she covered heartbreaking tragedies such as Dunblane and Lockerbie, and her gradual emergence as the undisputed Queen of Morning TV, Lorraine reveals a life like no other with characteristic warmth and charm. Entertaining, funny and a little bit mischievous, her anecdotes are garnered from a lifetime of meeting, greeting and interrogating the famous and infamous. Full of gossip, glamour and Lorraines inimitable good sense, LORRAINE: BETWEEN YOU AND ME is a book to settle on the sofa with.
In this sequel to Don't Make Me Smile, Charlie Hickle's life has become a three-ring circus. Why did his mom have to get remarried anyway? He wants things back the way they used to be—right now! From the Trade Paperback edition.
Ever Wonder Why The Same Patterns Happen To You Over And Over Again? We all have imprints, both negative and positive. An imprint is a belief that shapes our thoughts and actions, a belief we often hold unconsciously. Liliane Desjardins, a certified clinical addiction specialist, co-founder of Pavillon Gilles Desjardins, and co-creator of the Desjardins Unified Model of Treatment of Addictions, sets forth in "The Imprint Journey" an exploration of imprints, how they govern our lives, and how we can reprogram our minds to function in new and fulfilling ways. "The Imprint Journey" is equivalent to reading two powerful books in one. Liliane spends the first section telling her own story--a childhood in war-torn Croatia, the death of her mother, being an immigrant first to France and later French Canada--and the addictions and dysfunctions that marred her life until a suicide attempt resulted in a near-death experience. Her own personal recovery led her on a mission to help others find their own freedom from self-imposed and self-limiting imprints. The second half of this powerful book provides an anatomy of our imprints, revealing how to transform them so we are free to be our authentic selves. Liliane includes eight powerful personal stories of people who have overcome their imprints--including religious, sexual, and cultural limitations--as well as an overview of how understanding and rewriting our imprints can shape the human race's future as we all experience individual "Oneness." Readers will find themselves turning to The "Imprint Journey" again and again as a guide to relieve fears and to discover powerful truths about themselves that will transform them into their authentic selves. Acclaim For Desjardins' "The Imprint Journey" "Liliane writes from the depth of her own experience, with passion and power and a keen understanding of the human psyche. Her insights lift the reader above their own past patterns, providing insight both comforting and striking. The book inspires hope that no matter what we've been through, fundamental change is possible." --Marianne Williamson, author, A Return To Love "The Imprint Journey will touch your very soul and make way for profound transformation. From personal story to practical steps, Liliane walks with her readers on the path of awakening. Your life will be changed." --Carolyn Craft, Psychotherapist, Unity Minister, host of "Waking Up With Carolyn Craft" on Sirius Satellite Radio Learn more at www.LilianeDesjardins.com From Life Scripts Press www.RewritingLifeScripts.com

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