This eclectic collection of original essays explores women's musical activities and expressions from the twelfth century to the present
Women in Music: A Research and Information Guide is an annotated bibliography emerging from more than twenty-five years of feminist scholarship on music. This book testifies to the great variety of subjects and approaches represented in over two decades of published writings on women, their work, and the important roles that feminist outlooks have played in formerly male-oriented academic scholarship or journalistic musings on women and music.
This study highlights the connections between power, cultural products, resistance, and the artistic strategies through which that resistance is voiced in the Middle East. Exploring cultural displays of dissent in the form of literary works, films, and music, the collection uses the concept of 'cultural resistance' to describe the way culture and cultural creations are used to resist or even change the dominant political, social, economic, and cultural discourses and structures either consciously or unconsciously. The contributors do not claim that these cultural products constitute organized resistance movements, but rather that they reflect instances of defiance that stem from their peculiar contexts. If culture can be used to consolidate and perpetuate power relations in societies, it can also be used as the site of resistance to oppression in its various forms: gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality, subverting existing dominant social and political hegemonies in the Middle East.
This work includes 1000 entries covering the spectrum of defining women in the contemporary world.
Ethnomusicological fieldwork has significantly changed since the end of the the 20th century. Ethnomusicology is in a critical moment that requires new perspecitves on fieldwork - perspectives that are not addressed in the standard guides to ethnomusicological or anthropological method. The focus in ethnomusicological writing and teaching has traditionally centered around analyses and ethnographic representations of musical cultures, rather than on the personal world of understanding, experience, knowing, and doing fieldwork. Shadows in the Field deliberately shifts the focus of ethnomusicology and of ethnography in general from representation (text) to experience (fieldwork). The "new fieldwork" moves beyond mere data collection and has become a defining characteristic of ethnomusicology that engages the scholar in meaningful human contexts. In this new edition of Shadows in the Field, renowned ethnomusicologists explore the roles they themselves act out while performing fieldwork and pose significant questions for the field: What are the new directions in ethnomusicological fieldwork? Where does fieldwork of "the past" fit into these theories? And above all, what do we see when we acknowledge the shadows we cast in the field? The second edition of Shadows in the Field includes updates of all existing chapters, a new preface by Bruno Nettl, and seven new chapters addressing critical issues and concerns that have become increasingly relevant since the first edition.
"Joining archival research with telling analysis of significant examples of music, art, and drama, Kelley Harness challenges the prevailing view that Florence saw a political and artistic decline during this period. She argues that the female domination of these years brought forth artistic patronage that was both continuous and well-conceived. And the interdisciplinary breadth of evidence she uses to support her argument makes Echoes of Women's Voices a valuable contribution to women's studies, musicology, and the history of arts patronage."--BOOK JACKET.
Opera developed during a time when the position of women—their rights and freedoms, their virtues and vices, and even the most basic substance of their sexuality—was constantly debated. Many of these controversies manifested themselves in the representation of the historical and mythological women whose voices were heard on the Venetian operatic stage. Drawing upon a complex web of early modern sources and ancient texts, this engaging study is the first comprehensive treatment of women, gender, and sexuality in seventeenth-century opera. Wendy Heller explores the operatic manifestations of female chastity, power, transvestism, androgyny, and desire, showing how the emerging genre was shaped by and infused with the Republic's taste for the erotic and its ambivalent attitudes toward women and sexuality. Heller begins by examining contemporary Venetian writings about gender and sexuality that influenced the development of female vocality in opera. The Venetian reception and transformation of ancient texts—by Ovid, Virgil, Tacitus, and Diodorus Siculus—form the background for her penetrating analyses of the musical and dramatic representation of five extraordinary women as presented in operas by Claudio Monteverdi, Francesco Cavalli, and their successors in Venice: Dido, queen of Carthage (Cavalli); Octavia, wife of Nero (Monteverdi); the nymph Callisto (Cavalli); Queen Semiramis of Assyria (Pietro Andrea Ziani); and Messalina, wife of Claudius (Carlo Pallavicino).
From Adelaide in "Guys and Dolls" to Nina in "In the Heights" and Elphaba in "Wicked," female characters in Broadway musicals have belted and crooned their way into the American psyche. In this lively book, Stacy Wolf illuminates the women of American musical theatre - performers, creators, and characters -- from the start of the cold war to the present day, creating a new, feminist history of the genre. Moving from decade to decade, Wolf first highlights the assumptions that circulated about gender and sexuality at the time. She then looks at the leading musicals to stress the key aspects of the plays as they relate to women, and often finds overlooked moments of empowerment for female audience members. The musicals discussed here are among the most beloved in the canon--"West Side Story," "Cabaret," "A Chorus Line," "Phantom of the Opera," and many others--with special emphasis on the blockbuster "Wicked." Along the way, Wolf demonstrates how the musical since the mid-1940s has actually been dominated by women--women onstage, women in the wings, and women offstage as spectators and fans.
Aissata G. Sidikou and Thomas A. Hale reveal the world of women's songs and singing in West Africa. This anthology—collected from 17 ethnic traditions across West Africa—introduces the power and beauty of the intimate expressions of African women. The songs, many translated here for the first time, reflect all stages of the life cycle and all walks of life. They entertain, give comfort and encouragement, and empower other women to face the challenges imposed on them by their families, men, and society. Women's Voices from West Africa opens a new window on women's changing roles in contemporary Africa.
In Deutschland sitzen in den Vorständen der 100 umsatzstärksten Firmen gerade einmal drei Prozent Frauen. International sieht es nicht viel besser aus. Sheryl Sandberg ist COO von Facebook und gehörte davor zur Führungsmannschaft bei Google. Zusammen mit ihrem Mann Dave erzieht sie zwei kleine Kinder. Sie ist eine der wenigen sichtbaren Top-Managerinnen weltweit und ein Vorbild für Frauen aller Generationen. In ihrem Buch widmet sie sich ihrem Herzensthema: Wie können mehr Frauen in anspruchsvollen Jobs an die Spitze gelangen? Sie beschreibt äußere und innere Barrieren, die Frauen den Aufstieg verwehren. Sandberg zeigt, wie jede Frau ihre Ziele erreichen kann.
Rich with case material, this groundbreaking volume provides a comprehensive overview of music therapy, from basic concepts to emerging clinical approaches. Experts review psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and developmental foundations and describe major techniques, including the Nordoff-Robbins model and the Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music. An expansive section on clinical applications examines music therapy with children and adults, as well as its recognized role in medical settings. Topics include autism spectrum disorder, school interventions, brain injury, and trauma. An authoritative resource for music therapists, the book also shows how music can be used by other mental health and medical professionals. The companion website features audio downloads illustrative of the Nordoff-Robbins model.
After its initial publication in 1993, Mary A. Bufwack and Robert K. Oermann's Finding Her Voice: The Saga of Women in Country Music quickly became an essential book for country music scholars and fans. Now back in print, with updated material, an additional chapter, and new photos, Finding Her Voice is poised to reach a whole new generation of country music fans. From country's earliest pioneers to its greatest legends, Finding Her Voice documents the lives of the female artists who have shaped the music for over two hundred years. Through interviews, photos, and primary texts, Bufwack and Oermann weave a vast and complex tapestry of personalities and talent. Long overlooked and underappreciated by scholars, female country music artists have always been immensely popular with fans. This book gets to the heart of the special bond female artists have with their audiences. People seeking to understand the context out of which mega-stars such as Shania Twain, Faith Hill, and the Dixie Chicks emerged need look no farther than this book. Co-published with the Country Music Foundation Press
Do women in classical Hollywood cinema ever truly speak for themselves? In Echo and Narcissus, Amy Lawrence examines eight classic films to show how women's speech is repeatedly constructed as a "problem," an affront to male authority. This book expands feminist studies of the representation of women in film, enabling us to see individual films in new ways, and to ask new questions of other films. Using Sadie Thompson (1928), Blackmail (1929), Rain (1932), The Spiral Staircase, Sorry,Wrong Number, Notorious, Sunset Boulevard (1950) and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Lawrence illustrates how women's voices are positioned within narratives that require their submission to patriarchal roles and how their attempts to speak provoke increasingly severe repression. She also shows how women's natural ability to speak is interrupted, made difficult, or conditioned to a suffocating degree by sound technology itself. Telephones, phonographs, voice-overs, and dubbing are foregrounded, called upon to silence women and to restore the primacy of the image. Unlike the usage of "voice" by feminist and literary critics to discuss broad issues of authorship and point of view, in film studies the physical voice itself is a primary focus. Echo and Narcissus shows how assumptions about the "deficiencies" of women's voices and speech are embedded in sound's history, technology, uses, and marketing. Moreover, the construction of the woman's voice is inserted into the ideologically loaded cinematic and narrative conventions governing the representation of women in Hollywood film.
Anglican churches worldwide are sharply divided on homosexuality.The dominant stereotype is that of a “global south” vehemently opposed to a liberal and decadent “global north,” with irreconcilable differences between the two sides. Nothing is further from the truth: homosexual behavior exists across the whole Anglican Communion, whether it is openly celebrated or quietly integrated into local churches and cultures.In this extraordinary book, Christians throughout Africa, Asia, and the developing world—bishops, priests, lay people, and academics—open up dramatic new perspectives on familiar arguments and debates. Topics include biblical interpretation, sexuality and doctrine, local history, sexuality and personhood, the influence of other faiths, post-colonialism, and the place of homosexual persons in the church. Other Voices, Other Worlds reveals the rich historical and cross-cultural complexity to same-sex relationships, and throws an explosive device into a debate that has become stale and predictable.

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