English Inside the Black Box is an easy-to-follow booklet offering great advice and guidance on how to develop formative assessment in English.
Assessment for Learning is based on a two-year project involving thirty-six teachers in schools in Medway and Oxfordshire. After a brief review of the research background and of the project itself, successive chapters describe the specific practices which teachers found fruitful and the underlying ideas about learning that these developments illustrate. Later chapters discuss the problems that teachers encountered when implementing the new practices in their classroom and give guidance for school management and LEAs about promoting and supporting the changes.
Get to the core of your students’ understanding of math! Quickly and reliably identify your primary students’ math knowledge with these convenient and easy-to-implement diagnostic tools! Tobey and Fagan provide 25 new assessments specifically for Grades K–2 and directly aligned with the Common Core. Organized by strand, the probes will enable you to: Quickly and objectively evaluate each child’s prior knowledge of basic math and numeracy Systematically address common mistakes and obstacles before they become long-term problems Make sound instructional choices to improve all students’ math skills
'Every school a great school' is not just a slogan, but an aspiration for the next stage of education reform, in which each student has the opportunity to reach their full potential. The book argues that, for 'every school a great school' to become a reality, requires a move from individual school improvement efforts and short term objectives to a sustainable system-wide response that seeks to re-establish a balance between national prescription and schools leading reform. Achieving this goal requires strategies that not only continue to raise standards, but also build capacity within the system. David Hopkins identifies four key educational 'drivers' that, if pursued, have the potential to deliver 'every school a great school': Personalized learning Professionalized teaching Networking and innovation Intelligent accountability The author believes that it is the responsibility of system leaders to mould the four drivers to fit individual school contexts. It is this leadership that enables systemic reform to be generic in terms of overall strategy and specific in adapting to individual and particular situations. Every School a Great School is inspirational reading for head teachers, senior leaders and managers, researchers, lecturers and those with a passionate interest in improving education for all.
This comprehensive handbook combines up-to-date research - including Ofsted reports and pupil surveys - with road-tested classroom techniques to suggest how you can make your classroom a dynamic and productive learning environment. Advice is given on all aspects of history teaching, from how to plan for successful outcomes and maximise meaningful assessment, through to exciting ways to examine evidence and develop pupil interest outside of the classroom. The chapter on making effective use of ICT to teach history tackles one of the biggest challenges for teachers today: how to ensure new technologies are utilised to improve learning, without allowing the technology to detract from the history being taught. This book is perfect for trainee teachers and NQTs, but will also help experienced history teachers to make lessons inspiring and accessible to pupils with a range of specific educational needs, including pupils for whom English is not their first language, and those who are regarded as being gifted and talented.
This practical workbook contains all the advice, guidance and resources new and student history teachers need to reflect on and develop their teaching practice, helping them to plan lessons across the subject in a variety of teaching situations. Helpful features include: case studies examples of pupils’ work examples of existing good practice a range of tried-and-tested teaching strategies photocopiable resources and training materials activities in each chapter to help student history teachers analyze their learning and performance web links for further reading on evidence-based practice. Designed to be used independently or as an integrated extension of the popular textbook, Learning to Teach History in the Secondary School which provides detailed examples of theory in practice, this book is packed with examples of how to analyze practice to ensure maximized learning in the classroom.
The Essential Guide to Classroom Practice has been written with two questions in mind. These are the questions that are most important to all practitioners who seek to improve the quality of learning in their classrooms – what strategies work? and, how do we implement them? Covering all the areas that are key to effective teaching and learning, this text consists of over 200 practical strategies that secondary teachers can adopt and apply within their classroom. These strategies range from simple tools to improve the quality of questioning, to principles that can shape the whole approach to learning. Key topics covered include: The five-part lesson plan Developing thinking skills How to engage learners Encouraging collaborative learning Challenging and supporting Feedback and assessment A key feature of this book is the handy collection of ‘Top 10s’ that appear in each chapter, such as 10 ways to use data in the classroom and 10 ways to streamline your marking. The book clearly explains the benefit of each approach described and offers additional guidance on using websites and digital tools effectively in the classroom. Packed full of ideas, the book offers a one stop shop for busy teachers.
Debates in Mathematics Education explores the major issues that mathematics teachers encounter in their daily lives. It engages with established and contemporary debates, promotes and supports critical reflection and aims to stimulate both novice and experienced teachers to reach informed judgements and argue their point of view with deeper theoretical knowledge and understanding. Written by experts in the field of mathematics education, it investigates and offers fresh insight into topics of central importance, including: Gender, social inequality and mathematics Mathematics, politics and climate change The history and culture of mathematics Using popular culture in the mathematics classroom The concept of ‘ability’ and its impact on learning What we mean by ‘teaching for understanding’ Choosing and using examples in teaching The fitness of formal examinations. Designed to stimulate discussion and support you in your own research, writing and practice, Debates in Mathematics Education will be a valuable resource for any student or practising teacher engaged in initial teacher training, continuing professional development or Masters level study. It also has much to offer to those leading initial teacher education programmes, and to beginning doctoral students looking for a survey of the field of mathematics education research.
Classroom management is a topic of enduring concern for teachers, administrators, and the public. It consistently ranks as the first or second most serious educational problem in the eyes of the general public, and beginning teachers consistently rank it as their most pressing concern during their early teaching years. Management problems continue to be a major cause of teacher burnout and job dissatisfaction. Strangely, despite this enduring concern on the part of educators and the public, few researchers have chosen to focus on classroom management or to identify themselves with this critical field. The Handbook of Classroom Management has four primary goals: 1) to clarify the term classroom management; 2) to demonstrate to scholars and practitioners that there is a distinct body of knowledge that directly addresses teachers’ managerial tasks; 3) to bring together disparate lines of research and encourage conversations across different areas of inquiry; and 4) to promote a vigorous agenda for future research in this area. To this end, 47 chapters have been organized into 10 sections, each chapter written by a recognized expert in that area. Cutting across the sections and chapters are the following themes: *First, positive teacher-student relationships are seen as the very core of effective classroom management. *Second, classroom management is viewed as a social and moral curriculum. *Third, external reward and punishment strategies are not seen as optimal for promoting academic and social-emotional growth and self-regulated behavior. *Fourth, to create orderly, productive environments teachers must take into account student characteristics such as age, developmental level, race, ethnicity, cultural background, socioeconomic status, and ableness. Like other research handbooks, the Handbook of Classroom Management provides an indispensable reference volume for scholars, teacher educators, in-service practitioners, and the academic libraries serving these audiences. It is also appropriate for graduate courses wholly or partly devoted to the study of classroom management.
"This is a wonderful book with deep insight into the relationship between teachers' action and result of student learning. It discusses from different angles impact of action research on student learning in the classroom. Writing samples provided at the back are wonderful examples." —Kejing Liu, Shawnee State University Teacher Action Research: Building Knowledge Democracies focuses on helping schools build knowledge democracies through a process of action research in which teachers, students, and parents collaborate in conducting participatory and caring inquiry in the classroom, school, and community. Author Gerald J. Pine examines historical origins, the rationale for practice-based research, related theoretical and philosophical perspectives, and action research as a paradigm rather than a method. Key Features Discusses how to build a school research culture through collaborative teacher research Delineates the role of the professional development school as a venue for constructing a knowledge democracy Focuses on how teacher action research can empower the active and ongoing inclusion of nontraditional voices (those of students and parents) in the research process Includes chapters addressing the concrete practices of observation, reflection, dialogue, writing, and the conduct of action research, as well as examples of teacher action research studies
The fourth edition is essentially still about putting the principles of early childhood education into practice.

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