'For any criminologist looking to make sense of recent developments in the field, this is the go-to book. In essays by leading specialists, it provides the latest updates on traditional theories whilst charting new directions. It also offers intepretive frameworks for criminology's current flux and fragmentation and closely examines relationships among theory, policy, and criminal justice practice. Invaluable and indispensible!' - Nicole Rafter, Professor, Northeastern University The SAGE Handbook of Criminological Theory re-centres theory in the boldest, most thought-provoking form possible within the criminological enterprise. Written by a team of internationally respected specialists, it provides readers with a clear overview of criminological theory, enabling them to reflect critically upon the variety of theoretical positions - traditional, emergent and desirable - that are constitutive of the discipline at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Each chapter has been specially commissioned to include the following: " A brief historical overview of the theoretical perspective " Core ideas and key associated concepts " A critical review of the contemporary status of the perspective " Reflections on future developments In addition the Handbook features a substantive introduction by the editors, providing a review of the development of criminological theory, the state of contemporary criminological theory and emergent issues and debates. The SAGE Handbook of Criminological Theory is an indispensable international resource for libraries and scholars of all levels studying the rapidly developing, interdisciplinary field of criminology.
`Youth Crime and Justice presents a detailed and comprehensive critical analysis of evidence from leading national and international scholars. As such it provides a powerful antidote to the excesses of contemporary correctionalism' - Professor Andrew Rutherford, University of Southampton `Youth Crime and Justice is the most comprehensive and up-to-date collection on the market today. A must for all researchers, teachers and students of youth justice' - Professor Tim Newburn, London School of Economics and Political Science and President of the British Society of Criminology For the first time, leading national and international scholars have been brought together to engage explicitly with a comprehensive critical assessment of the relation between 'evidence' and contemporary youth justice policy formation. This book, along with its companion volume Comparative Youth Justice (edited by John Muncie and Barry Goldson) , will significantly advance the development of an emerging 'youth criminology'. The book is essential reading for criminology and criminal justice students, researchers and practitioners. Contributors' Affiliations: Tim Bateman is a Senior Policy Development Officer with Nacro, a UK-based crime reduction agency Chris Cunneen is Professor of Criminology and Director of the Institute of Criminology at the University of Sydney Matthew Follett is a Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Leicester Loraine Gelsthorpe is a Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge Barry Goldson is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Liverpool, England. Kevin Haines is Head of Applied Social Sciences at the University of Swansea Lynn Hancock is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Liverpool Harry Hendrick is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Southern Denmark Gordon Hughes is Professor of Criminology at the International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research at the Open University Fergus McNeill is a Senior Lecturer at the Glasgow School of Social Work, Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde Phil Mizen is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Warwick John Muncie is Professor of Criminology and Co-Director of the International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research at the Open University David O'Mahony is a Senior Lecturer in Youth Justice at the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, School of Law, Queen's University Belfast Gilly Sharpe is a Doctoral Research Student at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge David Smith is Professor of Criminology at Lancaster University Roger Smith is a Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Leicester Colin Webster is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Teesside Rob White is Professor of Sociology and Head of the School of Sociology and Social Work at the University of Tasmania
Over the last decade, the reformed youth justice system has seen increases in the numbers of children and young people in custody, a sharp rise in indeterminate sentences and the continuing deaths of young prisoners. The largest proportion of funding in youth justice at national level is spent on providing places for children and young people remanded and sentenced to custody. The publication of the Youth Crime Action Plan during 2008 and the increasing emphasis on early intervention provides a framework to consider again the interface between local services and secure residential placements. This report brings together contributions from leading experts on young people and criminal justice to critically examine current policy and practice. There are vital questions for both policy and practice on whether the use of custody reduces re-offending or whether other forms of residential placements are more effective long-term. The report looks at current approaches to the sentencing and custody of children and young people, prevention of re-offending and a range of alternative regimes.
This book assesses the implications of how children and young people are represented in print media in Northern Ireland – a post-conflict transitioning society. Gordon analyses how children and young people’s perceived involvement in anti-social and criminal behaviour is constructed and amplified in media, as well as in popular and political discourses. Drawing on deviancy amplification, folk devils and moral panics, this original study specifically addresses the labelling perspective and confirms that young people are convenient scapegoats – where their negative reputation diverts attention from the structural and institutional issues that are inevitable in a post-conflict society. Alongside content analysis from six months of print media and a case study on the representation of youth involvement in ‘sectarian’ rioting, this book also analyses interviews with editors, journalists, politicians, policy makers and a spokesperson for the Police Service of Northern Ireland. Noting the importance of prioritising the experiences of children, young people and their advocates, this timely and engaging research will be of specific interest to scholars and students of criminal justice, criminology, socio-legal studies, sociology, social policy, media studies, politics and law, as well as media professionals and policy makers.
The 2008 UK government Youth Crime Action Plan emphasises early intervention in work with young people who offend or considered to be 'at risk' of offending. This approach includes targeted work with families and a reduction in the numbers of young people entering the justice system. This report takes a critical look at early intervention policies.
This accessible introductory textbook combines criminology with sociologies of youth and social policy and presents an up-to-date and comprehensive picture of much of contemporary youth research and youth policy. Each chapter focuses on a substantive topic such as: political discourses; social histories; the extent and causes of offending; youth cultures; social policy and the youth justice system whilst emphasizing the importance of historical, feminist and comparative perspectives on youth crime and regulation. Many current aspects of the `youth problem' including joy-riding, homelessness, truancy, rave culture, boot camps, poverty and unemployment, parental responsibility, zero tolerance and electronic tagging are critically discussed wi
'In this pathbreaking volume Muncie and Goldson bring together leading authors to examine and compare youth justice systems around the world. Comparative Youth Justice will be of interest to all criminologists concerned with comparative penal policy and will be essential to all scholars of youth justice' - Professor Tim Newburn, London School of Economics and Political Science and President of the British Society of Criminology 'Comparative Youth Justice is what we need in an era of hardening social policies and irresponsible political demagoguery: thoughtful critiques, comparative analysis, and a commitment to the rights of youth. John Muncie and Barry Goldson have done a fine job of bringing together a group of commentators who know the inner workings of juvenile justice and what it will take to change the current law and order model. A book that is required reading for practitioners, professors, policy makers, researchers, and students concerned about the bankrupt state of juvenile justice and willing to consider new ideas and directions' - Tony Platt, California State University, Sacramento With contributions from leading commentators from 13 different countries, this carefully integrated edited collection comprises the most authoritive comparative analysis of international youth justice currently available. However, Comparative Youth Justice is not simply an attempt to document national similarities and differences, but looks critically at how global trends are translated at the local level. This book also examines how youth justice is implemented in practice with a view to promoting change as well as reflection. Each chapter addresses key critical issues: - the degree of compliance with international law; - the extent of repenalistion; - adulteration; - tolerance; - the impact of experiments in restoration and risk management. This book is designed as a companion volume to Youth Crime and Justice, edited by Barry Goldson and John Muncie, published simultaneously by SAGE Publications. 'This is a brilliant set of edited volumes that will be an indispensable and timely source of information and analysis for anyone with an interest in issues of youth justice and comparative criminology.' David A. Green, Oxford University
Praise of the First Edition `By providing accessible and readable introductions to often neglected aspects of crime, the volume is a welcome change from texts focusing on the more conventionally constructed problems of juvenile crime, theft and violent crime' - Reviewing Sociology This second edition of The Problem of Crime offers a comprehensive analysis of some of the most important developments in the study of crime. The book considers how the criminological gaze has shifted its focus from a preoccupation with 'crimes of the streets' to examining also the serious social harms and injuries associated with crime in the city, child abuse, domestic violence, organized crime, corporate crime, po
Presents arguments both in favor of and opposed to various treatments, programs, and punishments, examining issues such as youth curfews, juveniles in adult courts, legal representation for juveniles, juvenile boot camps, group homes, and out-of-home placement.
By focusing on key ideas in both criminology and criminal justice, this book brings a new and unique perspective to understanding critical research in criminology and criminal justice -- heretofore, the practice has been to separate criminology and criminal justice. However, given their interconnected nature, this book brings both together cohesively. In going beyond simply identifying and discussing key contributions and their effects by giving students a broader socio-political context for each key idea, this book concretely conceptualizes the key ideas in ways that students will remember and understand.
This comprehensive collection of original readings is designed to reflect and re-present the numerous and diverse lines of theoretical enquiry that constitute criminology. This volume consists of an accessible set of classic and contemporary readings that introduce students to the eclectic nature of `criminological knowledge'. In particular it focuses on: the origins of criminology; criminology's historic and continuing concern to discover the causes of crime; processes of criminalization and why it is that only certain harmful behaviours seem to be subject to criminal sanction; competing rationales for systems of crime control - from deterrence, just deserts and rehabilitation to crime prevention; issues of social control
This text aims to inform students about the latest research and the most promising and effective programs and provides a wealth of information for understanding, preventing and controlling juvenile delinquency. The history of current juvenile justice system policies and practices is examined, including the juvenile violence ′epidemic.′ Key myths about juvenile violence and the ability of the juvenile justice system to handle modern-day juvenile delinquents are discussed in depth. Developmental theories of juvenile delinquency are applied to understanding how juvenile offender careers evolve. Effective prevention and rehabilitation programs and what does not work are reviewed. And finally, a comprehensive framework for building a continuum of effective programs is presented. This book is intended as a supplementary text for undergraduate and graduate courses in juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, and violent offender intervention courses. It is also essential reading for juvenile justice and social services research and development specialists.
Victimology and crime prevention are growing, interrelated areas cutting across several disciplines. Victimology examines victims of all sorts of criminal activity, from domestic abuse, to street violence, to victims in the workplace who lose jobs and pensions due to malfeasance by corporate executives. Crime prevention is an important companion to victimology because it offers insight and techniques to prevent situations that lead to crime and attempts to offer ideas and means for mitigating or minimizing the potential for victimization. .In many ways, the two fields have developed along parallel yet separate paths, and the literature on both has been scattered across disciplines as varied as sociology, law and criminology, public health and medicine, political science and public policy, economics, psychology and human services, and more. The Encyclopedia of Victimology and Crime Prevention provides a comprehensive reference work bringing together such dispersed knowledge as it outlines and discusses the status of victims within the criminal justice system and topics of deterring and preventing victimization in the first place and responding to victims' needs. Two volumes containing approximately 375 signed entries provide users with the most authoritative and comprehensive reference resource available on victimology and crime prevention, both in terms of breadth and depth of coverage. In addition to standard entries, leading scholars in the field have contributed Anchor Essays that, in broad strokes, provide starting points for investigating the more salient victimology and crime prevention topics. A representative sampling of general topic areas covered includes: interpersonal and domestic violence, child maltreatment, and elder abuse; street violence; hate crimes and terrorism; treatment of victims by the media, courts, police, and politicians; community response to crime victims; physical design for crime prevention; victims of nonviolent crimes; deterrence and prevention; helping and counseling crime victims; international and comparative perspectives, and more.
Juvenile Justice: Process and Systems is an ideal textbook for those who wish to explore the theory and practice of providing justice to juveniles. Author Gus Martin introduces readers to juvenile justice in the contemporary era, while providing a contextual grounding in the historical origins of modern process and systems. This book is a review of institutions, procedures, and theories that are specifically directed toward addressing the problems of juvenile deviance and victimization.
Youth, Crime and Justice takes a critical issues approach to analyzing the current debates and issues in juvenile delinquency. It encourages readers to adopt an analytical understanding encompassing not only juvenile crime, but also the broader context within which the conditions of juvenile criminality occur. Students are invited to explore the connections between social, political, economic and cultural conditions and juvenile crime. This book engages with the key topics in the debate about juvenile justice and delinquency: juvenile institutions delinquency theories gender and race youth and moral panic restorative justice youth culture and delinquency. It clearly examines all the important comparative and transnational research studies for each topic. Throughout, appropriate qualitative studies are used to provide context and explain the theories in practice, conveying a powerful sense of the experience of juvenile justice. This accessible and innovative textbook will be an indispensable resource for senior undergraduates and postgraduates in criminology, criminal justice and sociology.

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