This book provides a thorough introduction to what is known about why people visit museums, what they do there, and that they learn. It offers recommendations and guidelines to help museum staff understand their clientele and their interactions with them.
Written over a span of more than two decades, the essays by Iris Marion Young collected in this volume describe diverse aspects of women's lived body experience in modern Western societies. Drawing on the ideas of several twentieth century continental philosophers--including Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty--Young constructs rigorous analytic categories for interpreting embodied subjectivity. The essays combine theoretical description of experience with normative evaluation of the unjust constraints on their freedom and opportunity that continue to burden many women. The lead essay rethinks the purpose of the category of "gender" for feminist theory, after important debates have questioned its usefulness. Other essays include reflection on the meaning of being at home and the need for privacy in old age residences as well as essays that analyze aspects of the experience of women and girls that have received little attention even in feminist theory--such as the sexuality of breasts, or menstruation as punctuation in a woman's life story. Young describes the phenomenology of moving in a pregnant body and the tactile pleasures of clothing. While academically rigorous, the essays are also written with engaging style, incorporating vivid imagery and autobiographical narrative. On Female Body Experience raises issues and takes positions that speak to scholars and students in philosophy, sociology, geography, medicine, nursing, and education.
Medicine supposedly offers a scientific account of the human body and of illness, and it follows that scientific medicine treats all forms of folk medicine as little more than superstitious practices. Professor Good argues that this impoverished perspective neglects many facets of Western medical practice and obscures its kinship with healing in other traditions. Drawing on his own anthropological research in America and the Middle East, his analysis of illness and medicine explores the role of cultural factors in the experience of illness and the practice of medicine.
Das Ziel des Kongresses war eine aktuelle und umfassende Bestandsaufnahme moderner Anwendungen von Informations- und Kommunikationssystemen. Insbesondere wurde auf den Nutzen eingegangen, der sich schon jetzt für die Anwender ergibt und für die Zukunft in noch stärkerem Maße erwartet wird. Dem ISDN als künftige technische Infrastruktur galt als Bezugsrahmen aktueller Planungen besonderes Interesse. Die Vortragsthemen waren so angelegt, daß aus verschiedenen Wirtschafts- und Gesellschaftsbereichen berichtet wurde, um ein umfassendes Gesamtbild über die Situation in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland zu gewinnen. Die Referenten hatten die Aufgabe, die Einsatzschwerpunkte der Informations- und Kommunikationstechniken darzustellen, auf die zukünftige Weiterentwicklung einzugehen und die erreichten bzw. geplanten Nutzeffekte zu erläutern. Der Kongreß gliederte sich in fünf Themenkomplexe, die auf folgende Anwendergruppen zugeschnitten waren: - Wissenschaft, Öffentliche Verwaltung - Banken, Versicherungen, Handel - kleine und mittlere Unternehmen sowie Handwerk - Energie- und Baugewerbe - Industrie (Anwender)
Creating Experiences in the Experience Economy focuses on the creation of experience from a business perspective. In doing so, the book establishes a more solid foundation for making better and more complex analyses of experience creation, paving the way for the development of analytically based and innovative experiences in experience firms and institutions. The contributors emphasise that experience creation is not an easy task with a straightforward formula and examine how marketed experiences are constructed, developed and innovated. Presenting diverse and innovative perspectives, the contributors discuss and present models for how experiences are designed, produced and distributed. With its cross-disciplinary approach to experience creation, this fascinating study will appeal to researchers and academics of business administration, services, culture and tourism.
In Technology as Experience, John McCarthy and Peter Wright argue that any account of what is often called the user experience must take into consideration the emotional, intellectual, and sensual aspects of our interactions with technology. We don't just use technology, they point out; we live with it. They offer a new approach to understanding human-computer interaction through examining the felt experience of technology. Drawing on the pragmatism of such philosophers as John Dewey and Mikhail Bakhtin, they provide a framework for a clearer analysis of technology as experience.Just as Dewey, in Art as Experience, argued that art is part of everyday lived experience and not isolated in a museum, McCarthy and Wright show how technology is deeply embedded in everyday life. The "zestful integration" or transcendent nature of the aesthetic experience, they say, is a model of what human experience with technology might become.McCarthy and Wright illustrate their theoretical framework with real-world examples that range from online shopping to ambulance dispatch. Their approach to understanding human computer interaction -- seeing it as creative, open, and relational, part of felt experience -- is a measure of the fullness of technology's potential to be more than merely functional.
Experience-centered design, experience-based design, experience design, designing for experience, user experience design. All of these terms have emerged and gained acceptance in the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design relatively recently. In this book, we set out our understanding of experience-centered design as a humanistic approach to designing digital technologies and media that enhance lived experience. The book is divided into three sections. In Section 1, we outline the historical origins and basic concepts that led into and flow out from our understanding of experience as the heart of people's interactions with digital technology. In Section 2, we describe three examples of experience-centered projects and use them to illustrate and explain our dialogical approach. In Section 3, we recapitulate some of the main ideas and themes of the book and discuss the potential of experience-centered design to continue the humanist agenda by giving a voice to those who might otherwise be excluded from design and by creating opportunities for people to enrich their lived experience with and through technology. Table of Contents: How Did We Get Here? / Some Key Ideas Behind Experience-Centered Design / Making Sense of Experience in Experience-Centered Design / Experience-Centered Design as Dialogue / What do We Mean by Dialogue? / Valuing Experience-Centered Design / Where Do We Go from Here?
Offering recommendations for the future and discussion points, this book explores the underlying concepts, methods and practices for experience-based design, applying a user-focused approach to healthcare systems.
Based on John Dewey's lectures on esthetics, delivered as the first William James Lecturer at Harvard in 1932, Art as Experience has grown to be considered internationally as the most distinguished work ever written by an American on the formal structure and characteristic effects of all the arts: architecture, sculpture, painting, music, and literature.