Despite a burgeoning debate on substantive issues in IPE, little attention has been devoted to its theoretical foundations. In this important new text, Matthew Watson reviews the main current theoretical approaches to IPE and highlights the problems that arise from treating 'states' and 'markets' as separate and contesting units of analysis. Foremost among these problems is the lack of attention given to theorizing the constitution of the individual as both an economic agent and a moral being.
'Erudite and accessible, McCann demonstrates how the national gets reconfigured around the global without losing some of its unique features. Far from being a one-size-fits-all Anglo-American template, neoliberalism comes in many different hues and variations. This is by far the best textbook in the field and is destined to become a classic for years to come.' Manfred B. Steger, Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawai'i-Manoa, Honolulu, Hawai’i, USA 'A sweeping examination of systems of capitalism in theory and in the world’s major industrial economies leads Leo McCann to challenge the conventional wisdom on globalization. Historical analysis of the evolution of business systems and detailed examination of present practice demonstrate persuasively that, despite facing common challenges, distinctive national differences remain salient. A must read for anyone who needs to understand how business systems operate in an increasingly interdependent world economy.' - Dr Eileen Appelbaum, Senior Economist, Center for Economic and Policy Research, Washington, DC, USA Globalization has profound effects on national economies even as distinct national ‘models’ of capitalism remain. International and Comparative Business accessibly tracks the historical and socio-political contexts of the world’s major countries on a chapter-by-chapter basis to the present day. The book provides a comprehensive, critical, yet concise introduction to each of the economies’ key features, including macro overviews as well as organizational and workplace-level analysis. Each chapter features learning objectives, in-depth interpretation and critique of key literature, and annotated further reading to allow readers to rigorously navigate their way through the wealth of material available for each country. This text is essential reading for students and researchers in the areas of international business and cross-cultural management, comparative political economy, and history. Leo McCann is Senior Lecturer in International and Comparative Management at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, UK
This unique collection presents a Post-Keynesian perspective on international economics and trade. All the major areas in international economics are covered, with the Post-Keynesian approach giving a welcome fresh perspective. The book is divided into five main sections: * foreign trade * open economy * international payments systems * exchange rate determination * development. Unavailable elsewhere, the readings present original, state-of-the-art research by leading Post-Keynesian scholars. Contributors include: Philip Arestis, Robert Blecker, Paul Davidson, Sheila Dow, Bruce Elmslie, Ilene Grabel John McCombie Eleni Paliginis, A.P. Thirlwall L. Randall Wray Johan Deprez, John T. Harvey,
What are the most fundamental differences among the political economies of the developed world? How do national institutional differences condition economic performance, public policy, and social well-being? Will they survive the pressures for convergence generated by globalization and technological change? These have long been central questions in comparative political economy. This book provides a new and coherent set of answers to them. Building on the new economics of organization, the authors develop an important new theory about which differences among national political economies are most significant for economic policy and performance. Drawing on a distinction between 'liberal' and 'coordinated' market economies, they argue that there is more than one path to economic success. Nations need not converge to a single Anglo-American model. They develop a new theory of 'comparative institutionaladvantage' that transforms our understanding of international trade, offers new explanations for the response of firms and nations to the challenges of globalization, and provides a new theory of national interest to explain the conduct of nations in international relations. The analysis brings the firm back into the centre of comparative political economy. It provides new perspectives on economic and social policy-making that illuminate the role of business in the development of the welfare state and the dilemmas facing those who make economic policy in the contemporary world. Emphasizing the 'institutional complementarities' that link labour relations, corporate finance, and national legal systems, the authors bring interdisciplinary perspectives to bear on issues of strategic management, economic performance, and institutional change. This pathbreaking work sets new agendas in the study of comparative political economy. As such, it will be of value to academics and graduate students in economics, business, and political science, as well as to many others with interests in international relations, social policy-making, and the law.
Eric Helleiner's new book provides a powerful corrective to conventional accounts of the negotiations at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, in 1944. These negotiations resulted in the creation of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank—the key international financial institutions of the postwar global economic order. Critics of Bretton Woods have argued that its architects devoted little attention to international development issues or the concerns of poorer countries. On the basis of extensive historical research and access to new archival sources, Helleiner challenges these assumptions, providing a major reinterpretation that will interest all those concerned with the politics and history of the global economy, North-South relations, and international development. The Bretton Woods architects—who included many officials and analysts from poorer regions of the world—discussed innovative proposals that anticipated more contemporary debates about how to reconcile the existing liberal global economic order with the development aspirations of emerging powers such as India, China, and Brazil. Alongside the much-studied Anglo-American relationship was an overlooked but pioneering North-South dialogue. Helleiner’s unconventional history brings to light not only these forgotten foundations of the Bretton Woods system but also their subsequent neglect after World War II.
Although many international political economy texts offer good descriptions of what events have occurred in global economic and political relations, they fail to develop explicit theoretical frameworks explaining why. Andrew C. Sobel's International Political Economy in Context: Individual Choices, Global Effects takes a micro approach to IPE, grounding policy choices in the deliberations and competitive environs of domestic politics and decision-making processes. Sobel builds students' skills for a sophisticated understanding of how and why events unfold in the international political economy. Armed with the primary assumptions and structural/macro conditions of economic and political geography in the global arena, as well as an understanding of micro-level conditions and mechanisms and their shortfalls that influence political and economic outcomes, students are able to make sense of past and present changes in the global political economy. International Political Economy in Context offers a compelling, accessible, and fully integrated rational choice perspective on international political economy.
'There is no better guide through the terrain of international political economy. Jerry Cohen has been a major contributor since the contemporary field emerged in the late 1960s at the intersection of international relations and international economics. He remains a superbly clear writer with first-hand knowledge of the key developments in what is now a truly global discipline. I recommend this book enthusiastically for introductory courses at the undergraduate or graduate levels.' - Louis W. Pauly, University of Toronto, Canada 'Benjamin J. Cohen's Advanced Introduction to International Political Economy evaluates the fragmented intellectual landscape of international political economy and suggests points of conversation, if not integration, among its varied elements. His analysis is wide-ranging and balanced, geographically and in its examination of a variety of standpoints; it is engaging in its combination of sympathy and criticism. All advanced students of the field will benefit from reading it.' - Robert O. Keohane, Princeton University, US 'A concise, readable and deeply informed survey of different approaches to international political economy. Essential reading for students in the field. Even advanced professionals will appreciate the diversity of perspectives examined. Cohen aims to create a more open field of IPE that appreciates and learns from difference. This book is a major contribution towards that goal.' - David A. Lake, University of California, San Diego, US 'Jerry Cohen occupies that rare position from which, when he defines a field, other people sit up and take notice. Here, his experience, insight and vision are brought to bear on how best to define international political economy (IPE) for students who are already familiar with its basic subject matter. Written with his usual panache and in his usual engaging prose, this is a must-read book for both advanced students of IPE and the people who teach them.' - Matthew Watson, University of Warwick, UK Elgar Advanced Introductions are stimulating and thoughtful introductions to major fields in the social sciences and law, expertly written by some of the world's leading scholars. Designed to be accessible yet rigorous, they offer concise and lucid surveys of the substantive and policy issues associated with discrete subject areas. In this unique and original advanced introduction, Professor Benjamin Cohen pinpoints the essential principles of international political economy and illuminates the full array of perspectives to be found across the globe in this rich field of study. Key Features include: * Provides a comprehensive global survey of IPE. * Concise introduction to the field written in an easily accessible, non-technical form. * In depth analysis of the most established American and British schools of IPE. * Extended discussion of other key national and regional traditions, focusing on the European continent, Latin America, Australia, Canada and China. * Combines a unique sketch of the geography of IPE with insight into how communities fit together. Written in a concise and lively style, the volume serves as an accessible yet thoughtful introduction to international political economy that will be an excellent supplement to leading texts used by advanced students and scholars specializing in international political economy and global political economy.
The first text to fully integrate economic principles with political analysis, State Power and World Markets provides a contemporary and comprehensive overview of the international political economy.
Following the financial crisis at the end of the twentieth century, regionalisms in the global political economy have evolved in a number of ways. This informative book brings together the leading scholars in the field to provide cutting edge analyses of contemporary regions and regionalist projects. Providing an innovative integration of theoretical issues with sophisticated analyses of a wide range of international case studies, the chapters systematically consider the relationship between globalization, financial crisis, and regional projects. In combination, the contributions to this volume provide the widest possible base within the literature for a truly comparative study of contemporary regionalism.