This first book in the new Foundations in Global Studies series offers a fresh, comprehensive, multidisciplinary introduction to South Asia. The variations in social, cultural, economic, and political life in this diverse and complex region are explored within the context of the globalising forces affecting all regions of the world. In a simple strategy that all books in the series employ, the volume begins with foundational material (including chapters on history, language, and, in the case of South Asia, religion), moves to a discussion of globalisation, and then focuses the investigation more specifically through the use of case studies. The cases expose the student to various disciplinary lenses that are important in understanding the region and are meant to bring the region to life through subjects of high interest and significance to today's readers. Resource boxes, an important feature of the book, are included to maintain currency and add utility. They offer links that point readers to a rich archive of additional material, connections to timely data, reports on recent events, official sites, local and country-based media, visual material, and so forth. A website developed by Syracuse University's South Asia Center will feature additional graphic, narrative, and case study material to complement the book.
This is the first book in M. E. Sharpe's new Foundations in Global Studies series and it offers a comprehensive introduction to this important region. The book opens with an overview of the area and it also features: a fresh, global perspective, foundational overviews, case studies, extensive resource notes, and end-of-chapter bibliographic materials.
To date, most research on immigrant women and labor forces has focused on the participation of immigrant women on formal labor markets. In this study, contributors focus on informal economies such as health care, domestic work, street vending, and the garment industry, where displaced and undocumented women are more likely to work. Because such informal labor markets are unregulated, many of these workers face abusive working conditions that are not reported for fear of job loss or deportation. In examining the complex dynamics of how immigrant women navigate political and economic uncertainties, this collection highlights the important role of citizenship status in defining immigrant women's opportunities, wages, and labor conditions. Contributors are Pallavi Banerjee, Grace Chang, Margaret M. Chin, Jennifer Jihye Chun, Héctor R. Cordero-Guzmán, Emir Estrada, Lucy Fisher, Nilda Flores-González, Ruth Gomberg-Munoz, Anna Romina Guevarra, Shobha Hamal Gurung, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, María de la Luz Ibarra, Miliann Kang, George Lipsitz, Lolita Andrada Lledo, Lorena Muñoz, Bandana Purkayastha, Mary Romero, Young Shin, Michelle Téllez, and Maura Toro-Morn.
Worlds Apart: Social Inequality in a Global Age, Third Edition is intended as the primary text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled in Social Stratification and Inequality courses, primarily taught in Sociology departments. This book focuses primarily on social inequalities in the American context. However, a trend in this course is how the global inequalities are effecting, and affected by social stratification and inequality in America. This edition reflects that trend.
Social Problems and Inequality explores integrated and root-cause-based explanations of complex social problems. Written in clear and understandable language, allowing it to be used for classroom purposes, it addresses the most fundamental principles of how humans, acting through social units, create, and eventually can remedy, social problems. With a central focus on the problem of inequality and the manner in which this is manifested in crime, social class and stratification, this book examines the key theoretical perspectives relevant to the study and solution of social problems, whilst drawing upon rich illustrations and case studies from the US and Europe to offer a thorough examination of the nature, common root causes and social remedies of social problems. Providing discussions of both theoretical approaches and concrete applications, Social Problems and Inequality investigates the sources of various prejudices and attitudes that contribute to social problems and the associated issues of globalization, economic greed and imperialism. Accessible in style and comprehensive in its coverage, this book will appeal to students and scholars of social problems across the social sciences.
"Global Problems: The Search for Equity, Peace, and Sustainability" examines the various dimensions of globalization and the social problems of inequality, war and violence, and environmental sustainability that are occurring on a global scale. Clear writing and vivid, current examples help readers to better understand their roles as global citizens. The book is divided into three parts: Part I focuses on the challenges of global inequalities: in life chances, wages and work, gender and education. Part II focuses on conflict and violence at all levels: from crime to politics, terrorism to war. Part III focuses on the issue of sustainability and the problems of urbanization, crowding, and environmental destruction.
Ideas and concepts are arguably the most important legacy of the United Nations. Ahead of the Curve? analyzes the evolution of key ideas and concepts about international economic and social development born or nurtured, refined or applied under UN auspices since 1945. The authors evaluate the policy ideas coming from UN organizations and scholars in relation to such critical issues as decolonization, sustainable development, structural adjustment, basic needs, human rights, women, world employment, the transition of the Eastern bloc, the role of nongovernmental organizations, and global governance. The authors find that, in many instances, UN ideas about how to tackle problems of global import were sound and far-sighted, although they often fell on the deaf ears of powerful member states until it was apparent that a different approach was needed. The authors also identify important areas where the UN has not stood constructively at the fore.