The renowned science fiction storyteller recalls his own story, from his youth in Depression-era Brooklyn and his early fascination with pulp magazines to his eventual pioneering of the seminal "Foundation" series.
It’s Been a Good Life, Dad!—My Son’s Struggle with Cystic Fibrosis portrays a young man—Kevin Hendon—who lived his eighteen years with cystic fibrosis ever present. The author, Jerry E. Hendon, tells the story of his son’s life in the first part of this biography. He presents the disease’s harsh truths and the severe limits—and of medicine’s ability to respond to the disease’s challenges. With equal clarity, though, he reveals the energy and determination his son showed in the face of his diagnosis. In the second part of It’s Been a Good Life, Dad!, Kevin’s poetry takes center stage. He shares his feelings of isolation and frustration. He ruminates on love, lust, and romance. He expresses his observations about friends and school. He reflects on the place of religion and family in his life. The final two sections of the book sample the recollections of people who knew Kevin and share the abiding influences of Kevin’s spirit in the wider community of those his life has touched. Whether you have cystic fibrosis or know someone who lives with this disease, you might find yourself turning the pages of this portrayal and feeling the temptation to echo the author’s despair when he said, “What a miserable life!” But in the face of this disease and in response to such tugs to give in to despair, Kevin’s responds, “Oh, no. It’s been a good life .... It’s been a good life.”
This book tells the story of a young woman who grew up in a poor, single parent home, surrounded by drugs, violence, and welfare recipients. K'Dee was known to be smart, academically, but the question was: Did she have common sense? K'Dee has always aspired to have the finer things; however, life had a different plan. At a young age, she ran from her problems until she built up the courage to face them head on with prayer, perseverance, and persistence. If you want to know how she survived the pain, hurt, and agony of an abusive marriage, managed a family while moving ten times in one year, overcame depression, coped with the death of her mother, battled her own illness, and conquered love, while chasing her dreams...it's all here! Through it all, people wondered how she could wear a smile on her face, dress like a millionaire, and still be thankful to God. Through all that K'Dee was challenged with, she came out on the other side of life with self-esteem, expectations and standards as high as Mount Everest. This humorous, yet serious self-examination of K'Dee's life is no exception To The hard work she produces.
They carried the Gospel of Jesus Christ to over twenty countries while building a network of agencies to assist in providing shelter for the homeless in the United States. This Black Pentecostal educator introduced to the White MIT trained aeronautical engineer and Quaker by a mutual Japanese American friend in the 1940s! IT'S BEEN A GOOD LIFE! is the story of the first couple sent out by the Church Of God In Christ to any country. Read of the sacrifices they made in leaving America in the 1950s to tell those in the bush of Liberia about the Savior. Be motivated by their courage in America to face down threats as they championed educating troubled youth at the school they built in the 1960s. Or just praise God for opening doors for their Community of Caring nonprofit in places like Cuba or Russia where they ministered to prisoners and visited hospitals during the Cold War. You will finish the book inspired to impact eternity as you meet 21st century challenges.
This is the witty, candid story of a daring young man who made his own way to the heights of American journalism and public life, of the great adventure that took him at only twenty years old straight from Harvard to almost four years in the shooting war in the South Pacific, and back, from a maverick New Hampshire weekly to an apprenticeship for Newsweek in postwar Paris, then to the Washington Bureau chief’s desk, and finally to the apex of his career at The Washington Post. Bradlee took the helm of The Washington Post in 1965. He and his reporters transformed it into one of the most influential and respected news publications in the world, reinvented modern investigative journalism, and redefined the way news is reported, published, and read. Under his direction, the paper won eighteen Pulitzer Prizes. His leadership and investigative drive following the break-in at the Democratic National Committee led to the downfall of a president, and kept every president afterward on his toes. Bradlee, backed every step of the way by the Graham family, challenged the federal government over the right to publish the Pentagon Papers—and won. His ingenuity, and the spirited reporting of Sally Quinn, now his wife, led to the creation of the Style Section, a revolutionary newspaper feature in its time, now copied by just about every paper in the country.
NOW UPDATED WITH A NEW EPILOGUE In the summer of 1964, aged twenty, Ray Davies led the Kinks to fame with their number one hit ‘You Really Got Me’. Within months, they were established among the pop elite, swamped by fans and fast becoming renowned for the rioting at their gigs. But Ray’s journey from working-class Muswell Hill to the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame was tumultuous in the extreme, featuring breakdowns, bitter lawsuits, spectacular punch-ups and a ban from entering the USA. His relationship with his brother Dave is surely the most ferocious and abusive in music history. Based on countless interviews conducted over several decades, this richly detailed and revelatory biography presents the most frank and intimate portrait yet of Ray Davies.
WINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE 2012. This is the gripping story of the men of the Welsh Guards and their bloody battle for survival in Afghanistan in 2009. Underequipped and overstretched, they found themselves in the most intense fighting the British had experienced in a generation. They were led into battle by Lieutenant Colonel Rupert Thorneloe, a passionate believer in the justness of the war who was deeply dismayed by the way it was being resourced and conducted. Thorneloe was killed by an IED during Operation Panther's Claw, the biggest operation mounted by the British in Helmand. Dead Men Risen draws on secret documents written by Thorneloe, which raise questions from beyond the grave that will unnerve politicians and generals alike. The Welsh Guards also lost Major Sean Birchall, commanding officer of IX Company, and Lieutenant Mark Evison, a platoon commander whose candid personal diary was unnervingly prophetic. Not since the Second World War had a single British battalion lost officers at the three key levels of leadership. Harnden transports the reader into the heart of a conflict in which a soldier has to be prepared to kill and die, to ward off paralysing fear and watch comrades perish in agony. Given unprecedented access to the Welsh Guards, Harnden conducted hundreds of interviews in Afghanistan, England and Wales. He weaves the experiences of the guardsmen and the loved ones they left behind into a seamless and unsparing narrative that sits alongside a piercing analysis of the political and military strategy. No other book about modern warfare succeeds on so many levels.
Seal the deal with a kiss. Zoe Larkin is facing the biggest career opportunity of her life, and she’s not going to let Jase Garrett ruin it for her. The infuriatingly sexy owner of the Rusty Wire, the hottest honky-tonk saloon in Barringer’s Pass, flat-out refuses to sell his bar and its surrounding land to her employer, the Alpine Sky ski resort. If Zoe can convince the stubborn cowboy to change his mind, she’ll not only impress her rich, handsome boss, but maybe—just maybe—people in town will finally start to take her seriously. When the Rusty Wire becomes the repeated target of violent intimidation tactics, though, the spunky redhead’s meticulous to-do lists and conservative blazers are no defense against her wild child reputation. The only person who understands what it takes to forget the past is standing between her and the future. But is it the future she wants? Or will Jase’s electric kiss ignite a fire in her heart for the life she truly desires?
In the small town of Harrison City, Pennsylvania, Jim Shirley began his life surrounded by family and community members. It didn¿t matter that they didn¿t have electricity, used a galvanized steel washtub for bathing, and had an outhouse for other necessities. A loving and caring mother, older siblings, and a home built of love were the stepping stones to a self made man. As Jim grows older, he learns what he wants to do in life, how to create a family of his own, and how to draw the most out of what life has to offer a person. After becoming a licensed funeral director in 1959, he was employed in the Pittsburgh area. Later, he purchased a home under unusual circumstances in North Huntingdon Township, Pennsylvania. As a budding funeral director he inadvertently became a community leader in the Lions International organization and, presented his speaking skills, he showed us what it means to bring a new meaning to life and enjoy every moment of it with the same wondrous awe we had as children.