This book offers a new approach to introductory scientific computing. It aims to make students comfortable using computers to do science, to provide them with the computational tools and knowledge they need throughout their college careers and into their professional careers, and to show how all the pieces can work together. Rubin Landau introduces the requisite mathematics and computer science in the course of realistic problems, from energy use to the building of skyscrapers to projectile motion with drag. He is attentive to how each discipline uses its own language to describe the same concepts and how computations are concrete instances of the abstract. Landau covers the basics of computation, numerical analysis, and programming from a computational science perspective. The first part of the printed book uses the problem-solving environment Maple as its context, with the same material covered on the accompanying CD as both Maple and Mathematica programs; the second part uses the compiled language Java, with equivalent materials in Fortran90 on the CD; and the final part presents an introduction to LaTeX replete with sample files. Providing the essentials of computing, with practical examples, A First Course in Scientific Computing adheres to the principle that science and engineering students learn computation best while sitting in front of a computer, book in hand, in trial-and-error mode. Not only is it an invaluable learning text and an essential reference for students of mathematics, engineering, physics, and other sciences, but it is also a consummate model for future textbooks in computational science and engineering courses. A broad spectrum of computing tools and examples that can be used throughout an academic career Practical computing aimed at solving realistic problems Both symbolic and numerical computations A multidisciplinary approach: science + math + computer science Maple and Java in the book itself; Mathematica, Fortran90, Maple and Java on the accompanying CD in an interactive workbook format
Thoroughly updated and reorganized, the new Second Edition of Programming and Problem Solving with Java continues to emphasize object-oriented design practices while offering numerous new case studies, end-of-chapter material, and descriptive examples, using Java 5.0. Programming and Problem Solving with Java, Second Edition is an exceptional resource for discovering Java as a first programming language.
The goal of Deitel & Associates, Inc.'s "Internet & World Wide Web How to Program, 3/e" is to introduce readers with little or no programming experience to the exciting world of Web-based applications. This comprehensive book with accompanying CD-ROM teaches the fundamentals needed to program on the Internet. Readers will be well-prepared to build real-world, industrial-strength, Web-based applications. In-depth coverage of introductory programming principles, various markup languages (XHTML, Dynamic HTML and XML), several scripting languages (JavaScript, VBScript, Perl, Python, PHP, ColdFusion, and FlashActionScript), Web servers (IIS and Apache), and relational databases (MySQL) provide all the skills and tools needed to create dynamic Web-based applications. This new edition contains chapters on Macromedia ColdFusion, a leading server-side scripting software package, and Macromedia Dreamweaver, a powerful WYSIWYG editor and Web application creation tool. Hundreds of LIVE-CODE examples (i.e., complete, working programs) of real applications throughout the book and on the accompanying CD allow readers to run the applications and see and hear the outputs. Readers learn to incorporate multimedia into Web pages and Web-based applications to enhance their presentations. Chapters on e-Business and Accessibility for people with disabilities expose readers to a wide range of other topics. For Internet and Web-based computer programmers, and others in organizations and businesses who need to develop their own Websites and pages.
TEACHING PHYSICS is a book about learning to be a more effective physics teacher. It is meant for anyone who is interested in learning about recent developments in physics education. It is not a review of specific topics in physics with hints for how to teach them and lists of common student difficulties. Rather, it is a handbook with a variety of tools for improving both teaching and learning of physics from new kinds of homework and exam problems, to surveys for figuring out what has happened in your class, to tools for taking and analyzing data using computers and video. TEACHING PHYSICS includes: an introduction to the cognitive model of thinking and learning that underlies modern physics education research principles and guidelines for making use of and understanding the implications of this cognitive model for the classroom a discussion of formative and summative evaluation with a variety of "thinking problems" useful for homework and exams a discussion of assessment of the success of instruction using research-based concept and attitude surveys discussion of 11 research-based curricular materials for use in lecture, lab, recitation, and workshops environments tips and guidelines for how to improve your instruction In addition, the book comes with a Resource CD containing 14 conceptual and 3 attitude surveys, more than 250 thinking problems covering all areas of introductory physics, resource materials from commercial vendors on use of computerized data acquisition and video, and a variety of other useful reference materials. TEACHING PHYSICS is a companion guide to using the Physics Suite, an integrated collection of research-based instructional material for lecture, laboratory, recitation, and workshop/studio environments. The elements of the Suite share the underlying philosophy of education described in this book.