Starting with history of music copyright from its origins to the present, this in-depth, intriguing, and beautifully written book explores the music industry through a legal lens. Author Kevin Parks presents a practical overview of music rights and licensing, while at the same time providing perspective, context, and clarity amidst the chaos and challenges of today's music business. He also uses this historical reference viewpoint to offer considered insights into how this dynamic business may evolve in the future.
Multimedia technology is a key component of the Digital Society. This book comprehensively examines the extent to which copyright and database right protect multimedia works. It does so from the perspective of UK law, but with due attention being paid to EU law, international treaties and comparative developments in other jurisdictions, such as Australia and the U.S. The central argument of the book is that the copyright and database right regimes are, for the most part, flexible enough to meet the challenges presented by multimedia. As a result, it is neither necessary nor desirable to introduce separate copyright protection or sui generis protection for multimedia works. This important and original new work will be essential reading for any lawyer engaged in advising on IP matters relating to the new media industries, and scholars and students working in intellectual property and computer law.
Non-Commercial digital piracy has seen an unprecedented rise in the wake of the digital revolution; with wide-scale downloading and sharing of copyrighted media online, often committed by otherwise law-abiding citizens. Bringing together perspectives from criminology, psychology, business, and adopting a morally neutral stance, this book offers a holistic overview of this growing phenomenon. It considers its cultural, commercial, and legal aspects, and brings together international research on a range of topics, such as copyright infringement, intellectual property, music publishing, movie piracy, and changes in consumer behaviour. This book offers a new perspective to the growing literature on cybercrime and digital security. This multi-disciplinary book is the first to bring together international research on digital piracy and will be key reading for researchers in the fields of criminology, psychology, law and business.
The landscape of copyright law has changed dramatically since the last edition of Understanding Copyright Law in 2005. During the past several years both the Congress and the courts have tried to adapt copyright law to the new, interactive (internet 2.0) digital technologies, such as You-Tube, and Facebook, and to efforts like the Google Book Search Project. This new 5th edition of Understanding Copyright Law has incorporated all the recent case law and legislative developments, focusing on the challenges of the digital age. Written with clarity and precision, this 5th edition of Understanding Copyright Law remains the most accessible and comprehensive text for students of copyright law.
"Bits of Power" assesses the state of international exchange of data in the natural sciences, identifying strengths, weaknesses, and challenges. The book makes recommendations about access to scientific data derived from public funding, examining trends in electronic transfer and management, pressure toward commercialization, and improving access to scientific data by and from the developing world.
This casebook provides a comprehensive survey of the primary entertainment law practice areas, including theater, motion pictures, music, and television. Although the book does not attempt to serve as a casebook for copyright, First Amendment, or trademark law, each of these legal doctrines are covered in sufficient fashion that a student without prior exposure to one or more of these doctrinal areas can still participate in an Entertainment Law course.The book addresses both the practical aspects of entertainment and the fundamental underpinnings of entertainment law. The selection of topics is based on what practitioners face, and the materials are selected to build a solid theoretical basis for that topic.This is the only book in the entertainment law field to address and integrate the need to teach the practitioner's issues with the jurisprudential framework necessary to make the course appropriate to the law school curriculum. It is especially useful for adjunct professors teaching the course because of its organization around the relevant issues to the practitioner.