Bart Goldstein was only sixteen when he suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a car accident in 2001. "No Stone Unturned" is the saga of Bart 's struggle to regain his life. Told from his father 's point of view, the book chronicles the family 's ordeal, and flashbacks fill in Bart 's life since he arrived from Korea at the age of five months. Considering every possibility in their search for remedies to Bart 's catastrophic injuries, the Goldsteins explored several promising alternatives, including craniosacral, hyperbaric oxygen, sensory learning, and vision restoration therapies. Bart 's remarkable recovery resulted from a combination of conventional medicine and alternative and emerging therapies.TBI has now become the signature injury for thousands of wounded warriors returning from Iraq and Afghanistan; this timely book offers profound insights into what survivors and their families must face. Anyone struggling with this invisible disability will find the book insightful, inspiring, and useful.
For understanding biblical Greek in context, the importance of the discoveries of papyri was recognized early in the twentieth century, while inscriptions by comparison were left unexplored. Those scholars who had intended to turn their attention to the inscriptions were delayed by their work on the papyri and by the conviction that the greater results would come from these. As a result, undue focus has been placed on papyri, and biblical Greek words have been viewed only through their lens, leading to the inference that the Greek is specifically Egyptian and vernacular. This volume widens the focus on Septuagint words by demonstrating how the inscriptions, coming from a broader geographical region than papyri and containing a wider range of registers, are a source that should not remain untouched. This work explains the current state of the study of Septuagint vocabulary and outlines the competing roles of papyri and inscriptions in its interpretation, including the limitations of focussing solely on papyri. The practical issues for a biblical scholar in dealing with inscriptions are presented and some guidance is given for those wishing to explore the resources further. Finally, examples are drawn together of how inscriptions can illuminate our understanding of Septuagint vocabulary, and thereby inform the socio-historical position of the Septuagint. The origins of apparently new words in the Septuagint, the semantic and grammatical function of words, and the geographical distribution and register all demonstrate the need for further investigation into this field.
A survey of how Highland society organised its farming communities, exploited its resource base and interacted with its environment from prehistory to 1914There has long been a view that the farming communities to be found in the Highlands prior to the Clearances were archaic forms. The way in which they were organised, the way in which they farmed the land and the technologies which they employed were all seen as taking shape during prehistory and then surviving relatively unchanged. Such a view first emerged first during the late nineteenth century and found repeated expression through a number of studies thereafter. However, its entrenchment in the literature was despite the fact that many ongoing studies have highlighted aspects of how the region changed from prehistory onwards. This study confronts this conflict over the question of continuity/discontinuity debate through an analysis of the cultural landscape. Starting with prehistory, it examines the way in which the farming community was organised: its institutional basis, its strategies of resource use and how these impacted on landscape, and the way in which it interacted with the challenges of its environment. It carries these themes forward through the medieval and early modern periods, rounding off the discussion with a substantive review of the gradual spread of commercial sheep farming and the emergence of the crofting townships over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Throughout, it draws out what changed and what was carried forward from each period so that we have a better understanding of the region's dynamic history, as opposed to the ahistorical views that inevitably flow from a stress on cultural inertia. Key Features:The book provides a one-stop text for the long-term history of the Highland countryside, one nuanced in ways that address topical themes like landscape and environmental change.It synthesises a great deal of work on the Highland farming community during the medieval and early modern periods in terms of its institutional organisation, resource exploitation, landscape impacts and interactions with environment so as to produce an overall review from prehistory down to 1914. Introduces new ideas and arguments that have not been treated or previewed in other published work, such as in chapter 6.Provides the most substantive review of the continuity/discontinuity debate in the Highland landscape currently available
In her second mystery, Ellie Stone—a young reporter in 1960s’ upstate New York—plays by her own rules while searching for a killer, putting her own life at risk. A dead girl in the woods. Three little oil spots on the dirt road. A Dr. Pepper bottle cap in the shallow grave. And a young reporter, armed with nothing but a camera. Evening is falling on a wet, gray, autumn day in upstate New York. Ellie Stone, twenty-four-year-old reporter for a small local daily, stands at a crossroads in her career and in her life. Alone in the world, battling her own losses and her own demons, Ellie is ready to pack it in and return to New York a failure. Then she hears the dispatch over the police scanner. A hunter, tramping through a muddy wood north of the small town of New Holland, has tripped over the body of a twenty-one-year-old society girl half-buried in the leaves. Ellie is the first reporter on the scene. The investigation provides a rare opportunity to rescue her drowning career, but all leads seem to die on the vine, until Ellie takes a daring chance that unleashes unintended chaos. Wading through a voyeuristic tangle of small-town secrets, she makes some desperate enemies, who want her off the case. Dead if necessary. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Kelly, a Traveller girl, is isolated and unhappy at her new school. Until the hot summer day when she meets Ben. Ben offers to help Kelly with her history project. It's just schoolwork - except that the investigation quickly becomes compelling. Strange puzzles are revealed. A dark secret of the local quarry comes to life. Soon the mystery of the past is spilling into the present - and into Kelly's own life. Kelly must bring the long-buried truth to light. And she will leave no stone unturned... A tense, moving mystery with brilliant historical detail of Victorian life, by the author of the Carnegie-nominated One Day In Oradour.
When a body turns up drowned in the quiet English village of Ashwyck, reporter Bob Rudgely's attempt to the identify the man leads him to discover more about the sleepy village then her ever imagined. As the case unfolds, Bob's loving relationship with the art teacher Sandie White seems to unravel in almost parallel proportions. It looks as if Sandie will even turn to another man who's in love with her - golf pro Bill Wells - for consolation as Bob becomes more and more absorbed in the mystery of Ashwyck.
The plot thickens at the Carraig as war threatens to erupt between the nations and student armies clash in the deadliest game the school has ever seen. Connor must face intrigue, deadly new enemies, and horrible poetry even to get a chance to risk everything on a final bid for freedom. The only way to save the Carraig may be to destroy it.
A fitting tribute to the life and achievements of Donald P. Hansen, this collection includes contributions by Z. Bahrani, R. A. Fazzini, R. E. Freed, P. O. Harper, J. and D. Oates, D. O'Connor, E. L. Ochsenschlager, E. Holmes-Peck, W. H. Peck, H. Pittman, M. Van de Mieroop, M. S. Venit, K. Wilson, I. J. Winter, and many others.