This book brings together original, peer-reviewed research providing new perspectives on the status quo and challenges for the future of Queer Theory / Queer Studies. Drawing inspiration from the conference in Queer Studies that was held at Canterbury Christ Church University in February and March 2009, the chapters offer analyses and insights into changing academic and public discourses on sexual and gender normativities within a wide multi- and trans-disciplinary scope. Transcending the binary axis of homo- vs. heterosexuality, the book analyzes, queries, and challenges multiple overt and hidden heteronormative and gender binarist assumptions; in six larger areas, paradigmatic discourses in academia and public life are discussed: Queered Identities, Queer Politics, Queering Public Discourses, Queering the Classroom, Pop Queer, and Queer Readings. The contributing authors represent the wide spectrum of scholarship engaged with Queer Theory, including political and social science, philosophy, history, literary criticism, cultural studies, education, psychology, and legal studies. They conversely and discursively contribute to the evaluation, reformulation, and if appropriate reclaiming of academic approaches in Queer Studies.
Contemporary scholars have begun to explore non-normative sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in a growing victimization literature, but very little research is focused on LGBTQ communities’ patterns of offending (beyond sex work) and their experiences with police, the courts, and correctional institutions. This Handbook, the first of its kind in Criminology and Criminal Justice, will break new ground by presenting a thorough treatment of all of these under-explored issues in one interdisciplinary volume that features current empirical work.
Este volume tem o objetivo de analisar o status quo e os desafios para o futuro dos Estudos Queer a partir de uma perspectiva inter/multidisciplinar, concentrando-se sobre as relacoes entre os eixos Sul-Norte. O presente livro oferece capitulos escritos em portugues e espanhol, visando a privilegiar vozes e conhecimentos do Sul.
<I>South-North Dialogues on Queer Epistemologies, Embodiments and Activisms is composed of research presented at the fourth international Queering Paradigms Conference (QP4), held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In line with the QP project ethos of bringing together diverse epistemological and geographical allegiances, this volume intends to contribute to building a queer postcolonial critique of the current politics of queer activism and of queer knowledge production and circulation. However, rather than perpetuating the North-South dichotomy, the papers gathered here are an effort to establish global dialogues that crisscross those axes, as well as attempts at queering epistemologies, socio-political bonds, and bodies, embodiments and identities. They endeavour to trouble unequal geographies of knowledge - namely the North as an exporter of theories and the South as their importer; the North as a producer of knowledge and the South as its object of study - hosting enormous potential for reinvention.
This book offers critical reflections on the intersections between criminology and queer scholarship, and charts future directions for this field. Since their development over twenty-five years ago, queer scholarship and politics have been hotly contested fields, equally embraced and dismissed. Amid calls for criminology and criminal justice institutions to respond more effectively to the injustices faced by LGBTIQ people, criminologists have recently developed a Queer Criminology and turned to queer scholarship in the process. Through a sweeping analysis of critical criminologies, as well as issues as varied as shame and utopian thought, Matthew Ball points to the many opportunities for criminology to engage further with the more politically disruptive strands of queer scholarship. His analysis highlights that criminology and queer theory are 'dangerous bedfellows', and that navigating the tension between them is central to confronting the social and criminal injustices experienced by LGBTIQ communities. This book will be of particular interest for scholars of criminology, criminal justice, LGBTIQ studies, gender studies and critical theory.
The essays in this book explore the different ways the body has been experienced and interpreted in history, from the medieval to the modern period. Challenging the negative perceptions that the term ‘disability’ suggests, the essays together present a mosaic of literary representations of bodies and accounts of real lives lived in their particularity and peculiarity. The book does not attempt to be exhaustive, but rather it celebrates the fact that it is not. By presenting a group of individual cases from different periods in history, the collection demonstrates that any overarching way of describing bodies, or unifying description of the experience of the myriad ways of being in a body, is reductive and unhelpful. The variability of each body in its context is our subject.
This book offers a fundamental challenge to a variety of theoretical, social, and political paradigms, ranging from law and justice studies to popular culture, linguistics to political activism.<BR> Developing the intellectual project initiated in <I>Queering Paradigms, this volume extends queer theorizing in challenging new directions and uses queer insights to explore, trouble, and interrogate the social, political, and intellectual agendas that pervade (and are often taken for granted within) public discourses and academic disciplines.<BR> The contributing authors include queer theorists, socio-linguists, sociologists, political activists, educators, social workers and criminologists. Together, they contribute not only to the ongoing process of theorizing queerly, but also to the critique and reformulation of their respective disciplines.
This book brings together perspectives on embodied queerness within the complicated parameters of hegemonic normativities, biopolitics and social-religious governmentalities. It offers queer interventions, explores value-production in socio-corporeal normative frameworks and exemplifies the complexity of queering in the global-local continuum.
Gender as a social class along with its concomitant heteronormative gender coercion seem to be intransigent across time and cultures. But across these cultures we also see a degree of nonconforming behaviour which very often carries significant multi-dimensions of stigma and risk; because the exception proves the rule, an understanding of gender nonconformity sheds light on the normative operation of gender in society. A Feminist Post-transsexual Autoethnography attempts to demythologise trans and gender diversity by conducting an in-depth critical analysis of the life choices of the autoethnographic subject (the author), who was so uncomfortable with their culturally allocated masculinity that they chose to live an apparently normal female life. The research is post-transsexual in that the subject forgoes passing in their affirmed gender to ensure the integrity of the data. A Feminist Post-transsexual Autoethnography may primarily appeal to students and researchers interested in the Sociology of Gender and Sociology of Trans and Gender Diversity, as well as the broader areas of embodiment and power differentials based on gender, class, nationality, location, temporality, sexuality and gender (non)conformity. This insightful volume may also be of interest to those within the fields Health Promotion and Education, Human Rights, Social Justice and Equity or the Social and Cultural Anthropology of Gender.
Americans think of their country as a welcoming place where everyone has equal opportunity. Yet historical baggage and anxious times can restrain these possibilities. Newcomers often find that civic belonging comes with strings attached––riddled with limitations or legally punitive rites of passage. For those already here, new challenges to civic belonging emerge on the basis of belief, behavior, or heritage. This book uses the term "elsewhere" in describing conditions that exile so many citizens to "some other place" through prejudice, competition, or discordant belief. Yet, in another way, "elsewhere" evokes an undefined "not yet" ripe with potential. In the face of America’s daunting challenges, can "elsewhere" point to optimism, hope, and common purpose? Through 12 detailed chapters, the book applies critical theory in the humanities and social sciences to examine recurring crises of social inclusion in the U.S. After two centuries of incremental "progress" in securing human dignity, today the U.S. finds itself torn by new conflicts over reproductive rights, immigration, health care, religious extremism, sexual orientation, mental illness, and fear of terrorists. Is there a way of explaining this recurring tendency of Americans to turn against each other? Elsewhere in America engages these questions, charting the ever-changing faces of difference (manifest in contested landscapes of sex and race to such areas as disability and mental health), their spectral and intersectional character (recent discourses on performativity, normativity, and queer theory), and the grounds on which categories are manifest in ideation and movement politics (metapolitics, cosmopolitanism, dismodernism).

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