A Handbook to Literary Research is a vital, one of a kind student resource, which has been written specifically for those embarking on a Masters degree in Literature. It provides an introduction to research techniques, methodologies and information sources relevant to the study of literature at postgraduate level. The unique and invaluable guide is divided into four sections: * a practical guide to the uses of research libraries, research sources and computers, including the Internet * an introduction to the work of textual scholars and bibliographers, focusing particularly on the practical and theoretical issues faced by textual editors * an overview of literary research and literary theory, including outlines of feminist theory, deconstruction, reader-response and reception theory, new historicism, and post-colonial theory * a detailed guide on how to write and present a Masters, including a glossary and checklist for finding guides, reference books and other study sources.
The last 20 years have seen a burgeoning of social scientific and historical research on food. The field has drawn in experts to investigate topics such as: the way globalisation affects the food supply; what cookery books can (and cannot) tell us; changing understandings of famine; the social meanings of meals - and many more. Now sufficiently extensive to require a critical overview, this is the first handbook of specially commissioned essays to provide a tour d'horizon of this broad range of topics and disciplines. The editors have enlisted eminent researchers across the social sciences to illustrate the debates, concepts and analytic approaches of this widely diverse and dynamic field. This volume will be essential reading, a ready-to-hand reference book surveying the state of the art for anyone involved in, and actively concerned about research on the social, political, economic, psychological, geographic and historical aspects of food. It will cater for all who need to be informed of research that has been done and that is being done.
This is the first modern, scholarly, detailed account of the Celtic languages found in one volume. The need for such a book has grown in recent years owing to the marked increase in interest in this important language-family on the part of linguists worldwide. The Celtic languages have various unique features, both structural and sociolinguistic, both inside and outside the Indo-European linguistic situation, that make them especially worthy of study. The languages examined are Gaulish, Irish, Scots Gaelic, Manx, Welsh, Breton, and Cornish. The Celtic Languagesdiscusses both the structural as well as the sociolinguistic aspect of the study of these languages. On the structural side, features such as initial consonant mutation, verb-subject-object sentences, the inflection of prepositions, and pre-sentential particles mark this group of languages, separating it from other Indo-European language groups. On the sociolinguistic side, the book discusses the unique fact that it is the only language group to consist solely of `minority languages'. All other groups contain at least one major language recognized as an official language of a nation state or of an autonomous region. This book discusses the Celtic languages historically, structurally and sociolinguistically, making it an excellent resource for all students and teachers of cultural studies and the Celtic language, as well as students of general linguistics. The historical sections include the origin and history of the Celtic languages, their spread and their retreat, present-day distribution, and a sketch of the extant and recently extinct languages. The structural sections include phonology, mutation, morphology, syntax, dialectology, and lexis. The sociolinguistic sections include domains of usage, maintenance, and prospects for survival. _