Drawing together the traditional recipes from different Indian cuisines, Sameen Rushdie’s invitation to share in the pleasures of Indian cookery is irresistible. In Hindustani a good cook is one that ‘has special taste in their hands’, and the author demonstrates her skill, knowledge and love of the food that is prepared and eaten in homes, bazaars and eating houses of the subcontinent. Bearing the needs of the modern cook firmly in mind, she explains her recipes in full, where the dishes originate, how to use spices, how to balance flavor, color and texture and offers suggestions for menus. Sameen offers a marvelous array of meat, poultry and fish dishes, together with vegetable creations which will give heart to cooks at the end of their vegetarian repertoire. She explains where to find fresh ingredients and how to store, prepare and use them, and makes it clear which recipes are most suitable for the end of a busy day. She takes up the cause of the potato with some sumptuous suggestions, describes the intrinsic part daals play in an Indian meal, gives tips for cooking chawal (rice) in pullao and biryani dishes and provides recipes for chapattis, parathas and pooris. There is an excellent introduction to spices; which explains their traditional groupings as well as their medicinal value, and a section on relishes, raitas and chutneys. Meethay—or sweet things—hold a special place in Indian cuisine and recipes for these from the elaborate to the simple are included. There is also a discussion of hot and cold drinks. Whatever your degree of experience in the kitchen, Sameen Rushdie offers not only clearly laid-out recipes, but a grasp of the actual thinking behind different cooking methods. Her menu plans and ideas about color, textures and flavors are a delight, and a meal prepared under engaging instruction will be a revelation to all who enjoy Indian cookery. Covering meat, poultry, and fish, as well as vegetables, chutneys, relishes and sweet dishes, Sameen Rushdie’s book will be a revelation to all those who enjoy Indian cookery.
Covers such topics as plant products, cooking terms, national and regional cuisines, food preservation, food science, diet, and cookbooks and their authors.
the best food reference work ever to appear in the English language ... read it and be dazzled' Bee Wilson, New Statesman First published in 1999, the ground-breaking Oxford Companion to Food was an immediate success and won prizes and accolades around the world. Its blend of serious food history, culinary expertise, and entertaining serendipity, was and remains unique. Interest in food, cooking, and the culture surrounding food has grown enormously in the intervening period, as has the study of food and food history. University departments, international societies, and academic journals have sprung up dedicated to exploring the meaning of food in the daily lives of people around the world, alongside an ever-increasing number of articles, books, programmes, and websites in the general media devoted to the discussion of food, making the Oxford Companion to Food more relevant than ever. Already a food writing classic, this Companion combines an exhaustive catalogue of foods, be they biscuits named after battles, divas or revolutionaries; body parts (from nose to tail, toe to cerebellum); or breads from the steppes of Asia or the well-built ovens of the Mediterranean; with a richly allusive commentary on the culture of food, expressed in literature and cookery books, or as dishes peculiar to a country or community. While building on the Companion's existing strengths, Tom Jaine has taken the opportunity to update the text and alert readers to new perspectives in food studies. There is new coverage of attitudes to food consumption, production and perception, such as food and genetics, food and sociology, and obesity. New entries include terms such as convenience foods, drugs and food, Ethiopia, leftovers, medicine and food, pasta, and many more. There are also new entries on important personalities who are of special significance within the world of food, among them Clarence Birdseye, Henri Nestlé, and Louis Pasteur. In its new edition the Companion maintains its place as the foremost food reference resource for study and home use.
Salman Rushdie is perhaps the most important writer of the present time. His significant and controversial literary interventions in debates on post-colonial culture and contemporary South Asian Islam are matched by the contribution he has made to postmodern literature in the West (culminating in the award to him in 1993 of the twenty-fifth-anniversary Booker of Bookers prize).This collection of articles focuses on Rushdie's five novels. The context is set by the introduction, The Politics of Salman Rushdie's Fiction, which discusses the political stance of Rushdie's fiction, the various influences on his work, and the textual strategies and techniques he employs, for political expression and cultural critique. The postmodern/post-colonial interface, the carnivalesque, and satire are major themes treated here and in the articles that follow, which also provide diverse other perspectives on Rushdie's thought and method. A number of essays have been commissioned specially for this volume. An appendix listing selected writings by Rushdie and articles on the Satanic Verses Affair is followed by a comprehensive bibliography annotating critical studies of Rushdie's work.
Selected essays from an international conference organized by the Indian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies in collaboration with, and at, the Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Simla, from 3 to 5 Oct. 1994.