Pack up the car and enjoy forty-five memorable routes in the Beaver State. Featuring over 4,800 miles of riding pleasure, this indispensable highway companion maps out unforgettable trips for exploring the region’s scenic byways and back roads. Embark on an adventure that winds along the mountainsides. Take in the magnificence of the Columbia River Gorge. Trek along a coastline that sports some of the earth’s most spectacular scenery. Along the way you’ll discover fertile farmlands, unspoiled wilderness, deserts filled with sagebrush, and breathtaking vineyards and orchards. Inside you’ll find Itineraries ranging from 5 to 325 miles in length Full-color photos and route maps for each drive In-depth descriptions of attractions along the way Optional side trips to museums, parks, and landmarks Tips on lodging, camping, dining, travel services, and best driving seasons
The Rough Guide to Australia is your indispensable guide to one of the most unmissable countries on earth. Packed with practical information on once-in-a-lifetime experiences in Oz, from sunrise walks around Uluru to viewing Kangaroo Island's wild seals, sea lions, kangaroos and koalas; bush-camping safaris in UNESCO World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park to exhilarating helicopter flights down the dramatic gorges of Aboriginal-owned Nitmiluk National Park - not forgetting the stunning harbour side bars and restaurants of Sydney. Written by a team of widely-travelled, dedicated authors, this Rough Guide will help you to discover the best hotels, restaurants, cafes, shops and festivals around Australia, whatever your budget. Plus, you'll find expert background on Australia's history, wildlife, cinema and fascinating aboriginal culture and the clearest maps of any guide. Make the most of your trip with The Rough Guide to Australia.
A reassessment of early exploration of the Blue Mountains. It argues that the popular account of this exploration is a myth. Recounts many journeys of exploration prior to Blaxland's party of 1813 and discusses the people involved including governors, convicts, bushrangers, visiting adventurers and the Aborigines who aided them. Includes references and an index.
We were enjoying a Jamaican meal at Verney''s Tropical Resort, a small inn perched in the hills over Montego Bay. This was a true Jamaican feast - not a watered-down tourist version - served with real Jamaican hospitality. It''s that opportunity to meet local residents, taste island dishes and retreat from the typical resort experience that brings travelers to the small inns, many in Montego Bay. While this bayside city is home to some of the Caribbean''s most lavish resorts, places where you can lose yourself in all-inclusive luxury and around-the-clock activities, you''ll also find plenty of opportunities to meet local people and learn more about the local culture in this thriving city. Montego Bay is more than just a tourist hub, however; it''s also a real city with a long-standing history. Columbus visited in May 1494 and named Montego Bay El Golfo de Buen Tiempo, or Bay of Good Weather. In 1510 the Spanish started to settle here. Using the bay as a shipping point for hogs, they began to call this site Bahia de Mantega, a name derived from the Spanish word for lard, which was one of the top products. In 1655 the British occupied Jamaica and the parish of St. James was founded soon after. Montego Bay became the capital of the parish and for many years was a tax-free haven. Surrounded by sugarcane plantations, the area became the home of many wealthy English planters. If you know just one Jamaica destination, it is probably Montego Bay, often just Mo Bay. Located on the north coast, this is the capital of the tourism industry and the second-largest community outside of Kingston. For most travelers, this is the starting point - thanks to the Donald Sangster International Airport - as well as the island''s busiest cruise pier. Ocho Rios is the garden center of Jamaica and its lushest area is Dunn''s River Falls. This spectacular waterfall, the top attraction, is a series of falls that cascade from the mountains to the sea. Here, you don''t just view the falls, but actually climb up them. Led by a sure-footed Jamaican guide (who wears everyone''s cameras slung around his neck), groups work their way up the falls hand-in-hand like a human daisy chain. West of Ocho Rios in the town of Oracabessa, 007 fans can visit the James Bond Beach. Located near Ian Fleming''s former home, Goldeneye, the beach has plenty of options for a day of activity: Wave Runners, helicopter tours and horseback rides, as well as a beach bar and grill. The town of Ocho Rios, often known by the nickname Ochi, sits on the north coast. The main road, called the North Coast Highway or A3 along this stretch, slices through the city, following the coastline. (Dunn''s River Falls is on the western side of town.) This entire stretch of road is lined with stony bluffs. Between the hills and the sea there is just enough room for a road and a strip of beach. As you approach the city from the western end, driving from Montego Bay, you''ll first see the cruise ship terminal. From here, you''ll be moving into the town itself. The North Coast Highway becomes DaCosta Drive; off that and parallel runs Main Street, where many of the shops and the crafts market are located. The main road continues east through town toward the large resorts, most of which lie east of the city. This travel guide walks with the adventurous traveler to the heart of Jamaica, to the miles of sand beaches, to the rugged Blue Mountains, to the country villages that provide a peek at the real Jamaica. The authors focus on the adventures this popular Caribbean island has to offer: scuba diving along coral reefs, biking mountain trails, deep sea fishing, parasailing, windsurfing, horseback riding, and other adventures that range from mild to wild. Special sections include a look at Jamaica''s Meet the People program, home visits, local nightspots, festivals, and more. Maps and photos enliven the down-to-earth text.
Following is an excerpt from this guide that specializes in some of the most popular areas of Jamaica. Also included in the guide is complete detail on where to stay, where to eat, what to see and what to do to make your trip unforgettable. We landed at Kingston''s Norman Manley International Airport long after dark. The city was celebrating Friday night in its traditional manner; the Friday Night Jam filled the streets with people glad the work week was over. We were in Kingston. But not for long. Our ride was taking us out of the city and up the Blue Mountains to Strawberry Hill. For the next hour, we wound our way through the city streets that we''d return to in later days, finally making our way out of the humidity and crowds and into the hills. The air grew cooler as we climbed, moving slowly back and forth on the switchback road. Finally, we were there. A pale glow lit the main building and restaurant, around the property we could see the small cottages outlined in dim light. But the real sight was from the restaurant itself. From here, we could see the lights of Kingston in the distance, far below us. The city was still partying down there, but here all was quiet as most visitors went to bed early, ready to rise the next morning to a foggy sunrise and a forest draped in quiet mist. We''d be bird watching the next day. It was time for our Friday Night Jam to end, not to reggae or dancehall music, but to the sound of night frogs and insects in the nearby forest. The capital city of Kingston lies on the south shore. This metropolitan area of over 800,000 residents is visited primarily by business travelers. Within this sprawling metropolis, however, beats the true heart of Jamaica. Travelers interested in the culture and history that define this island nation should make time for a visit to Kingston, the largest English-speaking city. Kingston is big, brash and boisterous. Life spills out from storefronts and homes onto the streets, filling the sidewalks and every inch of available space. Goats roam the downtown area, sidewalk vendors peddle all type of merchandise from carts and tables, pedestrians are everywhere. Kingston dates back to 1692. The city is built along the harbor, stretching from the Blue Mountains in the east to the boundaries of Spanish Town in the west. Kingston is not for everyone. It does not offer a relaxing, fun-in-the-sun vacation. Head to the North Coast resort communities for that type of getaway. Instead, if you''ve had a few dates with Jamaica and you''re ready to visit her parents, then it''s time to head to Kingston. Things aren''t always pretty here, but its a necessary part of the experience. No sheet, no eat is the motto of the weekly toga party at this resort known for its adults-only atmosphere. Hedonism II attracts fun-loving couples and singles over age 18 who come to this westernmost point of Jamaica for a vacation of sun, sand and something more. Guests leave their inhibitions behind, seeking pleasure in the form of festivities like Toga Night, buffets to tempt the most devoted calorie counters, bars open until 5 am, and nonstop adult fun. The real wildness in Negril lies just outside the city limits. Here, in an area known as the Great Morass, you can see a side of the country that most visitors never glimpse. Crocodiles, not vacationers, lie in the steamy afternoon sunshine. Peddlers sell, not marijuana, but shrimp caught using techniques over 400 years old. And spectacular birds, not parasailers, fill the air with dashes of color and a cacophony of exotic sounds. Today, Negril has gained respectability and is home to all types of resorts that attract everyone from swingers to families. Law mandates that no building here can be taller than a palm tree so low-rises follow the coast from Bloody Bay (named for the days when the whalers cleaned their catch here) to the cliffs at its southern end, where the Negril Lighthouse still signals the rocks to ships.