Shortly after the end of World War II, Laurence Whistler set out to write ‘a guide to the festivals of England as they are and as they might be’: the result is a captivatingly readable and enchanting narrative, the ancient holidays revealed as a microcosm of the wheel of life in England. Christmas, New Year, Twelfth night, Easter, May Day, Whitsun, Midsummer, Harvest (and sixteen others) - these are the most ancient of our traditions, more ancient than any present-day beliefs, and strong enough to have survived even the attacks of Puritans in the seventeenth century. Here, for example, is the radiant Kissing Bough, whose candles we lit before we had ever heard of a Christmas Tree. Here is the way to colour and engrave Easter Eggs. Here are fireworks in all their extravagant variety. Or here is the history of the Valentine and the Christmas Card. Laurence Whistler has written this scholarly book with the imaginative delight of a poet. This new edition features an introduction by art historian James Russell. “His book has been written in delight and passes on delight to the reader... it has a lovely benevolence; the author’s knowledge, his sense of values, his breadth of outlook are in evidence on every page.” John O’London’s Weekly “There is scholarship here about the past, and delight in the festivals of today... a book that will be delightful to pick up again at any time of the year.” Sunday Times “Possessing enchantment of matter, it has also enchantment of manner.” Time and Tide “Its younger readers will find themselves educated, perhaps unconsciously, by publisher as well as author.” Observer “A charming book.” Country Life “A most charming and decorative volume.” Sunday Chronicle “Learning and common sense have gone to the making of this attractive, well-illustrated book.” Birmingham News “A delightful gift book for all the year round... altogether charming.” Edinburgh Evening News “A book very much out of the ordinary.” Sphere
This comprehensive single-volume music reference covers a wide range of topics, including all styles of Western music as well as the music of Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Middle East, with articles by experts, short "quick reference" essays, and a wide range of instruments. (Performing Arts)
A history of the English music festival is long overdue. Dr Pippa Drummond argues that these festivals represented the most significant cultural events in provincial England during the nineteenth century and emphasizes their particular importance in the promotion and commissioning of new music. Drawing on material from surviving accounts, committee records, programmes, contemporary pamphlets and reviews, Drummond shows how the festivals responded to and reflected the changing social and economic conditions of their day. Coverage includes a chronological overview documenting the history of individual festivals followed by a detailed exploration of such topics as performers and performance practice, logistics and finance, programmes and commissioning, together with information concerning the composition and provenance of festival choirs and orchestras. Also discussed are the effects of improved transport and new technologies on the festivals, sacred and secular conflicts, gender issues, the role of philanthropy, the nature of patronage and the changing social status of festival audiences. The book will also be of interest to social, economic and local historians.
This volume brings together for the first time over a hundred of Oakeshott’s essays and reviews, written between 1926 and 1951, that until now have remained scattered through a variety of scholarly journals, periodicals and newspapers. A new editorial introduction explains how these pieces, including the lengthy essay on the philosophical nature of jurisprudence that occupies an important position in Oakeshott’s work, illuminate his other published writings. The collection throws new light on the context of his thought by placing him in dialogue with a number of other major figures in the humanities and social sciences during this period, including Leo Strauss, A.N. Whitehead, Karl Mannheim, Herbert Butterfield, E.H. Carr, Gilbert Ryle, and R.G. Collingwood.
Greek and Roman Festivals addresses the multi-faceted and complex nature of Greco-Roman festivals and analyses the connections that existed between them, as religious and social phenomena, and the historical dynamics that shaped them. It contains twelve articles which form an interdisciplinary perspective of classical scholarship on the topic.